Mount Sinai Goes Courtside at the US Open

The Mount Sinai Medical Center—recently named the official medical service provider and hospital of the USTA and US Open—will provide on-site clinical care for tennis players competing in the US Open, held August 26 to September 9, in Flushing Meadows, Queens. Mount Sinai also is the official sponsor of Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day, an annual tennis event for children that was held Saturday, August 24.

The five-year partnership with the USTA calls for Mount Sinai to develop recommendations around injury prevention and management and conduct educational outreach on the health benefits of playing tennis. Alexis Chiang Colvin, MD, Assistant Professor of Sports Medicine in the Leni and Peter W. May Department of Orthopaedics at The Mount Sinai Medical Center, serves as Chief Medical Officer of the USTA and US Open, as well as Medical Advisor to the U.S. Fed Cup team.

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Precision Medicine at Mount Sinai

Integrating a Patient’s Clinical and Molecular Information for Improved Diagnosis and Treatment

We often hear about the “potential” that biomedical science and technology have to offer “the future of medicine.” At The Mount Sinai Medical Center, some 25,000 patients are living that future and receiving more precise, personalized care—in real time—based on their own DNA.

Each has enrolled in BioMe (TM), our robust biobank which is among the largest such repositories in the United States. It is also unique in that each patient has broadly consented to DNA sequencing, contact from researchers, and longitudinal studies stemming from the electronic medical record (EMR). Mount Sinai has implemented the Epic EMR system throughout its inpatient and outpatient services, the emergency department, pharmacy, and in many affiliate offices across the city.

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Muppets, Push-ups, Pears, and other Matters of the Heart

February is American Heart Month, the time of year when the nation turns its attention to cardiovascular disease and other matters of the heart. While many public service efforts this month focus on educating people about the warning signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke, as members of the medical community we have a real opportunity to change the course of this disease by encouraging heart-healthy lifestyles well before risk factors develop.

Cardiovascular disease kills 7.3 million people across the globe each year, making it the world’s leading cause of death. In the United States alone, one in every three deaths is from heart disease and stroke, equal to 2,200 deaths per day. At Mount Sinai, our renowned Director of Mount Sinai Heart and Professor of Cardiology, Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, believes these sobering statistics mandate a new approach to preventing cardiovascular disease that identifies people much earlier in order to promote a healthy heart.

A new Muppet with a heart for health

So what do Muppets, push-ups and pears have to do with it? Many children between the ages of three and six who live in Spain already know. Born in Barcelona, Dr. Fuster is the inspiration for Spain’s newest Muppet, Dr. Valentin Ruster, who has a passion for heart health and appears in the Spanish version of Sesame Street. The only physician in the Muppet cast, Dr. Ruster’s character teaches kids how to make healthy decisions, like choosing fruits and vegetables, and having fun with exercise.

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Space for Innovation and Collaboration

How do we continue to make giant leaps in medicine? What new treatment or approach will allow us to make the greatest gains for patients, in the most effective and efficient ways possible? Where will the next breakthrough come from? These are questions that academics, clinicians, hospital CEOs and medical school deans are constantly asking as we seek to meet the challenges of modern healthcare.

People and technology have a clear role in the answer, but there is another critical factor that is often overlooked: space, and the spontaneity and ideas generated when scientists and clinicians have the ability to work side-by-side.

A great example of this came up during a recent panel discussion at our SINAInnovations conference. Eric M. Genden, MD, and Chief of the Division of Head and Neck Oncology, discussed his experience on a recent case in which a patient had distant metastatic disease that he and his team could not get to surgically. While working on the case, he happened to bump into Ross Cagan, PhD and Associate Dean of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. Through their conversation, Dr. Cagan suggested getting a biopsy of the tumor, sequencing it, dropping it into fruit flies, and crossing it with 150 different types of chemotherapeutic agents to see what kills the tumor. Over their chance meeting and a cup of coffee, they mapped out a targeted solution to treat the patient.

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