Barbara Murphy, MD, Named Chair of the Department of Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Barbara Murphy, MD, MB, BAO, BCh, FRCPI, a renowned transplant immunology researcher, has been named the Chair of the Samuel F. Bronfman Department of Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. The appointment makes Dr. Murphy the first female chair of Medicine of an academic medical center in New York City.  She has been the acting chair of the Department of Medicine, the largest department at Mount Sinai, since June, and Chief of its Division of Nephrology since 2004.

“For the past eight years, Dr. Murphy has demonstrated incredible leadership in the Division of Nephrology and helped elevate Mount Sinai’s already renowned transplant programs to a new level,” said Dennis S. Charney, MD, Anne and Joel Ehrenkranz Dean, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, The Mount Sinai Medical Center. “Her innovative approach to patient care, research, and education will undoubtedly extend the reach of Mount Sinai’s Department of Medicine as one of the finest in the nation.”

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Mount Sinai’s Supercomputer Ushers in a New Era

Mount Sinai School of Medicine recently unveiled its new supercomputer that is helping researchers unlock the intricate mechanisms that lead to human diseases, and hasten the discovery of treatments for them. The computer, named Minerva, after the Roman goddess of wisdom and medicine, was custom-built by Patricia Kovatch, the school’s first Associate Dean for Scientific Computing.

Minerva provides 64 million hours of computation per year. It has 7,680 processing cores, a peak speed of 70,000 gigaflops, and 30 terabytes of random access memory, making it one of the nation’s highest-performing computers in academic medicine.

“With its tremendous strength and speed, Minerva enables scientists to analyze and manipulate large data sets by running longer, more complex simulations,” says Ms. Kovatch. “This state-of-the-art technology will empower Mount Sinai’s researchers to expand the boundaries of their scholarly inquiry.” The computer’s ability to provide researchers with real-time computation of advanced molecular models and a quick analysis of genomic patterns will help Mount Sinai usher in a new era of personalized and precision medicine. Eric Schadt, PhD, Director of the Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology, and his researchers have been using Minerva extensively in their work.

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