Molecular Autism receives highest Impact Factor

On July 29, 2014, Thomson Reuters awarded an Impact Factor of 5.486 to the open access journal Molecular Autism. This represents the highest Impact Factor for any journal dedicated to autism or related neurodevelopmental conditions.

The journal was created in 2010, by Professor Joseph Buxbaum, Director of the Seaver Autism Center and Professor of Psychiatry, Neuroscience, and Genetics and Genomic Sciences at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Professor Simon Baron-Cohen, Director of the Autism Research Centre at the University of Cambridge. The goal of the journal was to provide an outlet for the volume of exciting genetic and other molecular autism research papers, and to make this cutting-edge autism research available freely via open access. In the past four years, Molecular Autism has grown and now publishes approximately five articles per month.

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Using A Tactic Unseen In A Century, Countries Cordon Off Ebola-Racked Areas

The New York Times reported: “The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is so out of control that governments there have revived a disease-fighting tactic not used in nearly a century: the “cordon sanitaire,” in which a line is drawn around the infected area and no one is allowed out.

Cordons, common in the medieval era of the Black Death, have not been seen since the border between Poland and Russia was closed in 1918 to stop typhus from spreading west. They have the potential to become brutal and inhumane. Centuries ago, in their most extreme form, everyone within the boundaries was left to die or survive, until the outbreak ended.

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NJ Health Officials Say Risk Is Low, But They’re Still On Watch For Ebola And Chikungunya

New Jersey Spotlight reported: “Worldwide alarm over the West African Ebola virus outbreak has highlighted the fact that such infectious diseases are spreading due to increased travel.

And that globalization of viruses has led New Jersey health officials to take precautions against tropical diseases, including testing for a pair of mosquito-borne viruses.

They’re also alerting healthcare providers to the symptoms of Ebola, which led to one state resident being isolated for part of last week until it was determined that the person wasn’t exposed to Ebola.

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A Front Line Against Ebola Runs Through Newark’s Terminal B

The New York Times reported: “Erica J. Sison has dealt with sick and dead dogs and cats, 40 dead lab rats in bags, trophy animals, cooked monkey meat on sticks, human skulls from Indonesia and a live Asian bat that flew out of an airplane cargo hold.

Now she is poised for Ebola, and has seen three false alarms in the last two weeks.

Ms. Sison, the quarantine officer in charge at Newark Liberty International Airport, is on the front lines of a complex system developed to protect United States borders from a “Contagion”-like invasion of rare foreign diseases. It is, she says, a bit anxiety provoking.

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Few Preparations In Event Of Ebola In US – Unclear How To Allot Drugs, Equipment

“We use a scoring system that predicts the likelihood of survival,” said Dr. Hassan Khouli, chief of the critical care section and chair of the ethics committee at Mount Sinai Roosevelt in New York City. Khouli serves on the state’s task force that is updating the guideline to include children. “The ethical principle driving this is to save the most lives.”

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“The Rationale For Most (cancer) Screenings Are Strong If There Is A Good Test…”

“If there is a test but there’s problems with it, I often go over this with a patient and how to decide if it’s necessary.”

Add mammography to the list of cancer screenings where evidence has challenged “best practices.”

Recently Dr. Sanjay Gupta of CNN reported in EveryDay Health that while early cancer detection can save lives, recent studies raise new doubts about the benefits of screening without considering the risks as well.

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“We Are Silently Irradiating Ourselves To Death.”

“… unless we change our current practices, 3 percent to 5 percent of all future cancers may result from exposure to medical imaging.”

CT, MRI, ultrasound, nuclear scan, PET scan – why not? Just to make sure.

Recently an article in the New York Times noted: “ DESPITE great strides in prevention and treatment, cancer rates remain stubbornly high and may soon surpass heart disease as the leading cause of death in the United States. Increasingly, we and many other experts believe that an important culprit may be our own medical practices: Of course, early diagnosis thanks to medical imaging can be lifesaving. But there is distressingly little evidence of better health outcomes associated with the current high rate of scans. There is, however, evidence of its harms.”

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The Mount Sinai Hospital Ranks among the Top in “Best Hospitals” Guidebook

The Mount Sinai Hospital has been ranked No. 16 out of nearly 5,000 hospitals nationwide in the U.S. News & World Report 2014–15 “Best Hospitals” guidebook. Additionally, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai achieved a No. 10 national ranking for Ophthalmology, while Mount Sinai Beth Israel and Mount Sinai St. Luke’s/Mount Sinai Roosevelt attained “high-performing” designations in a total of 11 specialties.

Further, according to U.S. News & World Report, The Mount Sinai Hospital is one of only 17 hospitals to receive “very high scores” in at least six clinical specialties, earning it Honor Roll status.

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Leading Conversations on the Future of Health Care at the Aspen Ideas Festival

The future of medicine, maintaining an edge in biomedical innovation, and the cost of health care in America were among the topics explored by Mount Sinai Health System leaders during the 2014 Aspen Ideas Festival, a yearly conclave that attracts several thousand policy makers, innovators, entrepreneurs, and executives who participate in thought-provoking discussions on health care and other major issues that impact America.

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