“I’m Here, Doc, to Make Sure I Don’t Have Anything Serious. I’m Not Sure My Regular Doctor Was Listening to Everything I Was Trying to Tell Him.”

The New York Times article included the following vignette:

“According to the nurse’s note, the patient had received a clean bill of health from his regular doctor only a few days before, so I was surprised to see his request for a second opinion. He stared intently at my name badge as I walked into the room, then nodded his head at each syllable of my name as I introduced myself.

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“…Many Decisions about Discussing Errors with Patients … Involve Situations in Which Other Clinicians Were Primarily Responsible for the Error.”

Have you ever wondered what your physician should say to you if a medical error by another physician is identified?

A New England Journal of Medicine article focused on this question.

“Although a consensus has been reached regarding the ethical duty to communicate openly with patients who have been harmed by medical errors physicians struggle to fulfill this responsibility …”

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“…Variation … is What Plagues Healthcare”

An article in Beckers Hospital Review focused on clinical care variation -

“Back when he was a resident, (he) saw two physicians perform separate colonoscopies, in which they discovered polyps in their respective patients. Each, however, went about removing the polyp in a different way — one via endoscopic surgery, another through open surgery. Despite having the resources and expertise to perform the procedure endoscopically, the physician who decided on surgery said his reason was a simple one: “That’s how I like to do it.”"

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“The Sudden Termination of a Close Doctor-Patient Relationship Is a Wrenching Scenario …”

A major source of emotional and spiritual suffering among patients who are nearing the end of life is the abandonment they feel when they stop being cared for by a physician to whom they have become attached.

The New York Times article noted “’I can tell you, it happens all the time and it breaks the heart of patients and families and oncologists,’ said Dr. Diane Meier, director of the Center to Advance Palliative Care at Mount Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine in New York City.”

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“How Healthcare Is Changing—for the Better”

There are many innovative practices being used to make sure patients are not unnecessarily readmitted to the hospital.

A U.S News article describes a discharge regimen used by the Cleveland Clinic.

“When Richard Jones of Niles, Ohio, 70, was discharged in May, he was sent home with a digital scale to flag any weight fluctuations (a possible sign of fluid buildup), a blood pressure cuff, and other monitoring equipment tied into the hospital system. He was also assigned a telemonitoring support team of nurses, social workers, nutritionists, therapists, and doctors who would check his vital signs daily, remotely or in person, for up to 40 days. In phone and house calls, the team coordinated follow-up doctor visits and counseled the lifelong cheeseburger-and-fries fan on worrisome symptoms to watch for and how to make lifestyle changes stick.”

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“… Comparing the Quality and Outcomes of Care at Competing Cancer Centers”

“Cancer!” Should you rush to a “major” cancer center?

The Modern Healthcare article noted “When it comes to cancer care, there is a huge disconnect between the possibilities of modern medicine and its day-to-day practice. As last fall’s troubling report from the Institute of Medicine noted, variation in oncology practice is wide; collection of quality and outcomes data is poor; and progress in learning what works best for any particular cancer remains slow and halting.”

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Teaching Heart-Healthy Habits to High-Risk Children and Families

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has received a $3.8 million grant from the American Heart Association (AHA) to promote cardiovascular health through early education and intervention programs targeting high-risk children and their parents in Harlem and the Bronx.

Mount Sinai researchers will study the genes and lifestyles of 600 preschoolers and their parents or guardians who live in these communities, which are associated with high rates of obesity, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. The investigators will track whether the interventions lead to healthier eating habits and additional exercise. They will also examine the participants’ DNA and RNA to understand how genetics plays a role in the development of cardiovascular disease.

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Young Patients Help Design Reception Area

Pediatric patients and their families recently joined artist and designer Edin Rudic in creating a new interior wall design for the Food for Life program in the Mount Sinai Health System’s Clinic for Inherited Metabolic Diseases. Mr. Rudic donated his services to create the new design located in the reception area of the Medical Genetics Clinic. It incorporates a high-definition screen display of patient photos, and specially coated walls on which children can draw, adding fun to their hospital visits.

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New Research Refutes Long-Held Antiviral Theory

A long-standing belief that mammals use the same potent antiviral molecules deployed by plants and invertebrates is being challenged by researchers at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Their findings, published in the July 10, 2014, issue of Cell Reports, surprised many scientists who assumed that antiviral RNA Interference (RNAi) exists in humans as a natural result of evolution.

Scientists know that human cells, like cells in every living organism with a nucleus, encode and generate small RNAs, which influence our genetics. It is also known that mammals combat viruses with interferons—proteins manufactured by immune cells in response to pathogens.

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