“What Personal Care Hospitalized Patients Now Get Is Mostly From Nurses.”

“When nursing is not optimal, patient care is never good.”

It’s always interesting and illuminating what we learn from physicians who report on their experiences as hosptalized patients.

Recently a New York Times article reported about the hospitalization experience of a legendary physician.

“Last June, the month he turned 90, Dr. Arnold S. Relman, the eminent former medical educator and editor, fell down a flight of stairs at his home in Cambridge, Mass. He cracked his skull and broke three vertebrae in his neck and more bones in his face.”

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Super Foods: The Tennis Edition

Sweating it out on the court day after day is a great way to become a better tennis player, but don’t forget that one of the most essential components of your training happens off the court. Proper nutrition is often the missing link needed to help maximize your training and reach performance goals. Fuel up on these six super foods and gear up for a great season!

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How to Stay Hydrated during the Summer

It’s summer (finally!), and there’s nothing better than some quality playing-time in beautiful weather. But, with the mercury rising, dehydration is a serious concern whether you’re having a marathon practice session or match, and can affect performance when as little as 2% of your body mass is lost through sweat. Since tennis players can lose more than 2.5 liters of sweat per hour in warm weather, it’s easy to fall behind on your fluid intake if you’re not careful.

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Plantar Fasciitis: A Primer

With summer now in full swing, many of us will be out running, trying our best at soccer to support the World Cup and gearing up our tennis skills with the French and US Open upon us. But since many of us are not pros, we may succumb to plantar fasciitis.

Plantar fasciitis (PF) is the most common cause of foot pain, and odds are if you’re active in exercise or an athlete, you probably have suffered through it. It’s characterized by inflammation of the tendons and muscles of the foot and calf where they insert on your heel, and is usually burning and sharp in sensation and worst with walking when you wake in the morning. You are at risk if you have flat feet, a leg length discrepancy, stand for long periods of time on hard surfaces, and are overweight.

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Tennis Elbow

Tennis elbow is a common injury found in tennis players and other sports. The pain is on the outside of the elbow, where the wrist extensor muscles originate, and is usually tender when palpated. The pain is worsened with hand shaking, opening jars, using a knife or fork or even using a toothbrush. Tennis elbow is more common in males, and those in the range of 30-50 years of age. It is important, however, to remember that people outside this age range also get tennis elbow frequently. Tennis players make up the majority of cases, but it is also found among baseball players, gardeners, house or office cleaners, carpenters, mechanics, and golfers.

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Ebola In West Africa: Four Questions For The U.S. Response Going Forward

The Kaiser Famly Foundation noted: “As of August 14, 2014, the Ebola virus has infected an estimated 1,975 individuals across four countries in West Africa, leading to 1,069 deaths (including three Americans). The official reported numbers, frightening as they are, likely vastly underestimate the true magnitude of the outbreak. Ebola has severely impacted the daily life of affected communities, and raised concerns across the globe about its ongoing spread. The fact that this outbreak has led to so many cases and deaths (approximately 45% of all cases of Ebola ever reported have come since March of this year) is concerning for the individuals and families struggling with the disease, and leads to questions regarding the global capacity to detect and respond to such events. It also brings up four key policy questions for the U.S. concerning its engagement with the international community’s efforts to combat Ebola and other emerging infectious disease outbreaks.”

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Ebola Cure Scams Are Out There; Beware, FDA Warns

Modern Healthcare noted: “The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday issued a warning to the public after receiving consumer complaints of products being sold online claiming to prevent or treat the Ebola virus that has killed more than 1,000 people across four countries in West Africa.

The severity of the Ebola outbreak has recently led Nigeria to issue a stern warning to anyone—such as faith healers and traditional medicine practitioners—promoting Ebola cures that they risk arrest, according to reports.

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CDC Director On Ebola: ‘We Are Definitely Not At The Peak’

NPR reported: “On Monday, Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, arrived in Liberia to assess the Ebola outbreak. The situation “is overwhelming,” he said.

The outbreak “really is a crisis and is affecting most if not all the counties in Liberia already,” he told NPR from Monrovia, the capital city and first stop on a three-country visit. “This is absolutely unprecedented.”

The CDC, Frieden said, “is working flat out on this, but this is huge and needs a global response … They need a lot of help from the world.”

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Hospitals Get Ready For Ebola – “Case Is Inevitable In The United States”

The New York Times reported: “Hospitals nationwide are hustling to prepare for the first traveler from West Africa who arrives in the emergency room with symptoms of infection with the Ebola virus.

Dr. Thomas R. Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has said such a case is inevitable in the United States, and the agency this month issued the first extensive guidelines for hospitals on how recognize and treat Ebola patients.

The recommendations touch on everything from the safe handling of lab specimens to effective isolation of suspected Ebola patients …

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US Hospitals Have Had 68 Ebola Scares, CDC Says

ABC News reported: “American hospitals and state labs have handled at least 68 Ebola scares over the last three weeks, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Hospitals in 27 states alerted the CDC of the possible Ebola cases out of an abundance of caution amid the growing outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Fifty-eight cases were deemed false alarms after CDC officials spoke with medical professions about patient exposures and symptoms, but blood samples for the remaining 10 were sent to the CDC for testing, the agency told ABC News today.

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