Blazing a New Trail in the Treatment of Heart Disease

An injectable nanoparticle that delivers HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, or statins, which directly inhibit atherosclerotic plaque inflammation could represent a new frontier in the treatment of heart disease. This novel approach is being developed by researchers at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, who have seen promising results in mice models and plan to translate their findings to humans within the next few years.

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Expertise in Mitral Valve Repair

Mitral Valve Prolapse (MVP) is a common heart valve abnormality that affects up to 5 percent of the U.S. population. The mitral valve controls the flow of blood from the lungs to the main pumping chamber of the heart. MVP results from a degeneration of valve structure that leads to a regurgitation of blood backwards that can result in heart enlargement and weakening, as well as fatigue and shortness of breath.

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A Leader in Cardiovascular Care for HIV Patients

What started as a casual observation among physicians almost a decade ago—that patients with HIV tend to develop hypertension and have a greater risk of heart attacks than the general population—has become a formal area of study and treatment within the Mount Sinai Health System.

Under the direction of Merle Myerson, MD, EdD, Director of the St. Luke’s Roosevelt Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, and Director of the Cardiology Section of the Spencer Cox Center for Health, patients with HIV are being closely monitored and treated for heart disease and stroke. In fact, cardiovascular care has become increasingly critical to the overall health of HIV patients, as more of them live well into their 70s and 80s.

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Skin Care Over 50

As we age our skin changes in many ways. For one, it loses some of the underlying layers of fat that give us a youthful appearance. Our skin also loses elasticity and tone, which leads to wrinkles, and becomes less able to retain moisture. The oil production glands on the face become smaller, as well.

While these changes are a normal part of aging, there are some things that can be done to slow the process and mask some of the appearance. Keep in mind that the key to skin care over the age of 50 is prevention, and consider adopting these healthy skin practices:

Advances in Tourette Syndrome Research: Histamine and Genomics

A recent NBC News article highlighted the importance of genetic research and the potential therapeutic application of histamine for individuals with Tourette Syndrome (TS). TS is a chronic neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics. Onset of tics occurs before age 18 and is often associated with marked impairment and disability.

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How to Boost Your Health with Allium Vegetables (Recipe Included!)

Allium vegetables comprise approximately 500 species, the most common including onions, leeks, garlic, chives, and shallots. They have been valued throughout history for their flavor as well as their medicinal properties. Rich in health-promoting flavanols and organosulfur compounds, alliums have increasingly attracted the interest of the medical community for their potential to play a part in preventing cancer.

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Melanoma in African Americans

Although skin cancer has a lower incidence in patients of color, it can occur. The most common type of skin cancer varies based on your ethnic background, with African Americans being most at risk for squamous cell carcinoma. However while melanoma is often associated with people who have blue eyes and blonde hair, it also occurs in people with darker skin tones.

For reasons that are unclear, melanomas in African Americans most commonly develop on the palms of the hands, soles of the feet, and nails. Unfortunately, when these melanomas are discovered they are more aggressive at the time of presentation. The overall five-year melanoma survival rate for African Americans is only 77 percent, versus 91 percent for Caucasians. Read more