Reducing Sepsis Mortality Rates

A novel program implemented across the Emergency Department and all inpatient units at The Mount Sinai Hospital is being credited with helping the hospital achieve a three-year reduction in sepsis mortality.

The “Stop Sepsis Program” is based upon a project developed in 2011 by the Department of Emergency Medicine and the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine to enhance the early identification and management of patients with suspected sepsis, a condition that results from infection and can quickly become life-threatening when it impairs blood flow to organs.

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Mount Sinai to Open Kidney Stone Center

A comprehensive outpatient Kidney Stone Center, which will offer patients new minimally invasive techniques and a holistic approach to prevention, will be the first of its kind in New York City when it opens this fall in two Manhattan locations.

The Center will be headed by Mantu Gupta, MD, who was recently named Director of Endourology and Stone Disease for the Mount Sinai Health System, Chair of Urology at Mount Sinai Roosevelt and Mount Sinai St. Luke’s, and Professor of Urology.

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Eye Safety Tips Over Labor Day Weekend

In the U.S., more than 9,000 fireworks injuries happen each year, with roughly 1 in 8 fireworks injuries harming the eyes. With Labor Day weekend celebrations approaching, Dr. Ronald C. Gentile, Professor of Ophthalmology and the Chief of Ocular Trauma Service at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, wants to remind people of some eye health and fireworks safety tips.

“Common fireworks and sparkler eye injuries include burns, lacerations, abrasions, retinal detachment, optic nerve damage and ruptured eyeball,” says Dr. Gentile. “And children are frequent victims of these injuries. As many as 30 percent of eye traumas caused by fireworks impact kids.”

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“William Howard Taft, the Only Massively Obese Man (at 350 Pounds) Ever to Be President … Struggled Mightily to Control His Weight a Century Ago…”

The New York Times article noted: “On the advice of his doctor, a famed weight-loss guru and author of popular diet books, he went on a low-fat, low-calorie diet. He avoided snacks. He kept a careful diary of what he ate and weighed himself daily. He hired a personal trainer and rode a horse for exercise.”

“Obesity experts said Taft’s experience highlights how very difficult it is for many fat people to lose substantial amounts of weight and keep it off, and how little progress has been made in finding a combination of foods that lead to permanent weight loss.”

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“We Called It a Hotel near a Major Teaching Hospital”

“Though the views were spectacular, the cardiac arrest team could not get there as quickly as it could to the regular wards.”

The New York Times article asked the questions “What is going on here? Is This a Hospital or a Hotel?”

“The Henry Ford health system in Michigan caused a stir after it hired a hotel industry executive, Gerard van Grinsven of the Ritz-Carlton Group, in 2006 to run its new hospital, Henry Ford West Bloomfield. There are some medical arguments for the trend — private rooms, for example, could lower infection rates and allow patients more rest as they heal. But the main reason for the largess is marketing.”

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“The Health Care System … Is a National Treasure and Deserves to Be … Protected.”

The New York Times article reported that quote from former Vice President Dick Cheney.

“Former Vice President Dick Cheney was so close to death in 2010 that he said farewell to his family members and instructed them to have his body cremated and the ashes returned to Wyoming, he writes in a new book on his long battle with heart disease.”

“Mr. Cheney ultimately survived the emergency surgery that night and went on to have a heart transplant at age 71 that has left him re-energized five years after leaving office. But for the first time, he describes a 35-year medical struggle that he kept generally private in vivid personal detail.”

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“Many Medical Ethicists Frown on the Practice of Doctors Accepting Money from Drugmakers – Arguing They Can Develop a Bias toward One Company’s Drug and Fail to Recommend the Best Possible Medications for Patients.”

The Newsday investigation: “Three Long Island doctors selected to lead a committee that recommends the drugs two Suffolk hospitals stock for patients accepted tens of thousands of dollars from pharmaceutical companies while serving on the advisory panel.”

“The doctors — affiliated with John T. Mather Memorial and St. Charles hospitals in Port Jefferson — accepted about $125,000 from drugmakers between 2009 and 2013, company records show.” They… ” received most of the payments for speeches promoting the companies’ drugs…”

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Every “Free” Sample (a Doctor Accepts) Comes with a Price.

Do drug company reps influence doctor prescribing practices?

A NPR article noted “Dermatologists who accept free tubes and bottles of brand-name drugs are likelier to prescribe expensive medications for acne than doctors who are prohibited from taking samples, a study reports…”

“The difference isn’t chump change. When patients see a dermatologist who gets and gives free samples, the average cost of medicines prescribed is $465 per office visit. That cost drops to about $200 when patients see a doctor who can’t hand out freebies, a team at Stanford University found.”

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“Medical Errors Are a Quiet and Largely Unseen Tragedy.”

“Every year between 210,000 and 440,000 Americans die as a result of medical errors and other preventable harm at hospitals, according to researchers.”

These numbers are equivalent to a jumbo jet crashing every day with no survivors. Based on these figures, medical errors could be considered the third-leading cause of death in America, behind heart disease (more than 590,000 a year) and cancer (more than 570,000 a year).

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