A Special Musical Performance for Staff

Mount Sinai Beth Israel Security Guard Will Parker, also a talented singer, actor, and composer, gave an informal vocal performance on Monday, February 2, at Mount Sinai Beth Israel Phillips Ambulatory Care Center. He sang a variety of tunes, including songs from Broadway musicals, jazz, spirituals, and a tribute to Nat King Cole. Joanne Loewy, DA, LCAT, MT-BC, Director, The Louis Armstrong Center for Music & Medicine, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, accompanied Mr. Parker on piano; and Andrew Rossetti, MMT, MT-BC, LCAT, Coordinator of Music Therapy, Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, backed him up on guitar. The event kicked off “Celebrating Black History Month” and was co-sponsored by Mount Sinai Beth Israel’s Diversity Council and The Louis Armstrong Center for Music & Medicine.

Mount Sinai Receives STRIVE Award

The Mount Sinai Health System received the first Outstanding Employer Award from STRIVE (Support Training Results In Valuable Employees) on Tuesday, January 20, at the New York Yale Club, for its exceptional commitment to training and hiring graduates from the STRIVE program. The organization presents the award to employers who help individuals with high barriers to employment—such as recovering addicts, public assistance recipients, and the working poor—develop marketable skills and gain employment in living-wage jobs. Read more

Saluting a Career Devoted to Patient Care, Research, Education, and Advocacy

Kristjan T. Ragnarsson, MD, the Dr. Lucy G. Moses Professor and Chair of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine for the Mount Sinai Health System, was recently honored by the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation with its 2014 Frank H. Krusen, MD, Lifetime Achievement Award, its highest honor. The Academy saluted Dr. Ragnarsson’s longtime commitment to patient care, research, education, and advocacy. The award was established in 1972 for Dr. Krusen, a founding father of the Academy and early developer of the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation specialty. Read more

A New Era for Bone Marrow Transplantation

Seminal research led by James Ferrara, MD, DSc, Ward-Coleman Chair in Cancer Medicine, has produced a promising approach to treating patients with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)—a sometimes fatal complication of bone marrow transplantation in which the donor’s immune cells attack the recipient’s body. Bone marrow transplants are often used to treat patients with leukemia, lymphoma, and other blood diseases. Read more

Are Antibiotics Necessary for the Common Cold?

The common cold is a viral infection that affects the nose and throat with associated sneezing, headaches, and cough. The rhinovirus is the most common type of virus that causes colds; however, there are more than 200 viruses that may cause the common cold. Antibiotics are not effective against viruses and are used to treat bacterial infections.

One of the largest misconceptions is that the color of the mucus suggests a bacterial infection. A patient can have yellow or green mucus and still have the common cold. The most important sign that would indicate a bacterial infection is present is the duration of symptoms. The American Academy of Otolaryngology guidelines for acute sinusitis require the presence of symptoms for greater than 7 to 10 days before being considered a bacterial infection. In addition, symptoms of the common cold may last for up to two weeks with cough and post nasal drip being the last symptoms to go away. Read more

Five Reasons We All Experience Back Pain

Experts estimate that as many as 80% of people will experience back pain at some point in their lives. While the pain can be debilitating, most are able heal by themselves however, many have to turn to alternative options for treatment.

The foundation of all treatments of back pain is physical therapy yet, depending on the particular cause of back pain, there are additional treatments available. Below are five common causes of back pain and Pain Management treatments to help improve the pain. Read more

The Most Common Inherited Heart Disease: Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited heart disease; it causes thickening of the heart muscle without a clinical cause to explain the extent of thickening observed.

HCM causes symptoms of dyspnea or shortness of breath, chest pain, exercise intolerance, syncope or fainting, and uncommonly, sudden cardiac death (SCD). It affects individuals of all ages but most commonly presents after age 30. Many patients with HCM have a relatively benign course and can have normal life expectancy, and symptoms can be managed with first-line pharmacologic agents like beta blockers or verapamil. However, a quarter of patients will experience in their course either severe disabling symptoms or SCD. Read more