Super Foods: The Tennis Edition

Sweating it out on the court day after day is a great way to become a better tennis player, but don’t forget that one of the most essential components of your training happens off the court. Proper nutrition is often the missing link needed to help maximize your training and reach performance goals. Fuel up on these six super foods and gear up for a great season!

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How to Stay Hydrated during the Summer

It’s summer (finally!), and there’s nothing better than some quality playing-time in beautiful weather. But, with the mercury rising, dehydration is a serious concern whether you’re having a marathon practice session or match, and can affect performance when as little as 2% of your body mass is lost through sweat. Since tennis players can lose more than 2.5 liters of sweat per hour in warm weather, it’s easy to fall behind on your fluid intake if you’re not careful.

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Plantar Fasciitis: A Primer

With summer now in full swing, many of us will be out running, trying our best at soccer to support the World Cup and gearing up our tennis skills with the French and US Open upon us. But since many of us are not pros, we may succumb to plantar fasciitis.

Plantar fasciitis (PF) is the most common cause of foot pain, and odds are if you’re active in exercise or an athlete, you probably have suffered through it. It’s characterized by inflammation of the tendons and muscles of the foot and calf where they insert on your heel, and is usually burning and sharp in sensation and worst with walking when you wake in the morning. You are at risk if you have flat feet, a leg length discrepancy, stand for long periods of time on hard surfaces, and are overweight.

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Tennis Elbow

Tennis elbow is a common injury found in tennis players and other sports. The pain is on the outside of the elbow, where the wrist extensor muscles originate, and is usually tender when palpated. The pain is worsened with hand shaking, opening jars, using a knife or fork or even using a toothbrush. Tennis elbow is more common in males, and those in the range of 30-50 years of age. It is important, however, to remember that people outside this age range also get tennis elbow frequently. Tennis players make up the majority of cases, but it is also found among baseball players, gardeners, house or office cleaners, carpenters, mechanics, and golfers.

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CDC Director On Ebola: ‘We Are Definitely Not At The Peak’

NPR reported: “On Monday, Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, arrived in Liberia to assess the Ebola outbreak. The situation “is overwhelming,” he said.

The outbreak “really is a crisis and is affecting most if not all the counties in Liberia already,” he told NPR from Monrovia, the capital city and first stop on a three-country visit. “This is absolutely unprecedented.”

The CDC, Frieden said, “is working flat out on this, but this is huge and needs a global response … They need a lot of help from the world.”

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Hospitals Get Ready For Ebola – “Case Is Inevitable In The United States”

The New York Times reported: “Hospitals nationwide are hustling to prepare for the first traveler from West Africa who arrives in the emergency room with symptoms of infection with the Ebola virus.

Dr. Thomas R. Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has said such a case is inevitable in the United States, and the agency this month issued the first extensive guidelines for hospitals on how recognize and treat Ebola patients.

The recommendations touch on everything from the safe handling of lab specimens to effective isolation of suspected Ebola patients …

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US Hospitals Have Had 68 Ebola Scares, CDC Says

ABC News reported: “American hospitals and state labs have handled at least 68 Ebola scares over the last three weeks, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Hospitals in 27 states alerted the CDC of the possible Ebola cases out of an abundance of caution amid the growing outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Fifty-eight cases were deemed false alarms after CDC officials spoke with medical professions about patient exposures and symptoms, but blood samples for the remaining 10 were sent to the CDC for testing, the agency told ABC News today.

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Experts Weigh In On Ebola Epidemic, Treatment, Prevention, And Social Effects

The New England Journal of Medicine noted: “Four brief NEJM perspectives examine the current Ebola epidemic, which is the largest and longest-lived on record.”

“One of the three clinically oriented contributions describes the World Health Organization’s declaration of a public health emergency and its implications.”

“Another offers information on drugs that have shown activity against the virus; it describes the problem (and ethics) of collecting efficacy data on these treatments mid-epidemic.”

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WHO Panel Says Unproven Drugs Are Ethical As Ebola Death Toll Tops 1,000

A CNN story reported: “The first two doses of an experimental serum created to treat Ebola went to American missionaries.Then the drug was sent to treat a Spanish priest.The two Americans, Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol, appear to be recovering. The priest, Miguel Pajares, died Tuesday morning.That’s the problem with experimental drugs that have never been clinically tested in humans: No one knows whether they’ll work — and if they do, in whom.”

“This week, the World Health Organization gathered a group of ethicists to decide whether proven medications and vaccines should be used in the current Ebola outbreak. As the death toll from the epidemic soared over 1,000, the WHO panel unanimously concluded that it is ethical to offer medications to fight the Ebola virus, even if their effectiveness or adverse effects are unknown.”

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Experimental Drug Used For Ebola-Related Virus Shows Promise

The New York Times reported: “An experimental drug has completely protected monkeys from lethal doses of a virus related to Ebola, bolstering confidence that a similar medicine might be effective if deployed in the current outbreak in Africa, researchers reported on Wednesday.

The researchers said that the drug, which is being developed by Tekmira Pharmaceuticals, kept all monkeys alive in a study, even if given as late as three days after exposure to the Marburg virus, when the virus was already detectable in the animals’ blood.

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