Genetic Research Leading to Advances in Autism Care

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) describes a group of neurodevelopmental disorders with a wide range of severity and symptoms affecting 1 out of 68 children in the United States. While there is currently no medicine for this complex condition, discovering genetic causes of ASD will help accurate diagnosis and prediction of additional likely symptoms, thereby improving medical treatment. Genetic findings can also provide families with critical information about the clinical course of the disease and provide opportunities for family counseling. New genetic findings allow scientists to conduct more specific research into the mechanisms that cause ASD as well as the many subtypes and symptoms of the condition. Finally, genetic findings also allow for detailed study of the way these genes function, which can help scientists design new treatments and develop more tailored medical support in the form of personalized medicine.

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Social Support Helps Those with Sarcoidosis

Sarcoidosis is a multisystem, inflammatory disease, which can involve all organ systems to a varying degree and extent. Upon diagnosis or afterward, patients are commonly overwhelmed by their disease and frequently ask questions that include: How did I get this disease; Will it spread to all my organs; Will it kill me; which of my other ailments are related to sarcoidosis and do I need treatment for them; Can I expect to live a normal life; Should I be on a special diet; Will my kids inherit sarcoidosis?

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What to Know about Childhood and Teen Obesity

We commonly hear that two-thirds of all adults in the U.S. are overweight or obese, and that adult obesity has risen at an alarming rate over the past 30 years. What is less commonly heard is that the rate of obesity has risen nearly three times faster in adolescents as compared to adults in the past 30 years! Importantly, 70 percent of obese teens become obese adults, and adult obesity has been linked to other serious diseases including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and several forms of cancer. Thus, the teen years represent a particularly crucial time to reach kids and help them build healthier habits that they can continue into adulthood.

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Mount Sinai Health System Names Three Chief Medical Officers

The Mount Sinai Health System has appointed three new chief medical officers to lead The Mount Sinai Hospital, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, and Mount Sinai Queens.

Vicki LoPachin, MD, a respected member of the medical community who completed her residency and chief residency in internal medicine at Mount Sinai, recently returned to The Mount Sinai Hospital to serve as Chief Medical Officer.

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A New Affiliation with The New York Academy of Medicine

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and The New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM) announced the formation of a new partnership to jointly study and address a number of significant health issues and policies that impact the lives of people who live in urban areas. NYAM is an historic and independent institution that has been advancing the health of people living in cities since its founding in 1847.

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Mount Sinai Scientists Appear on CBS This Morning

In February, CBS This Morning had a segment on Mount Sinai’s novel use of fruit flies to screen for personalized cancer drugs. Ross Cagan, PhD, Associate Dean of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, discussed how his laboratory replicates a patient’s tumor and implants it in a fruit fly. Then his team tests an arsenal of 840 drugs—all approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for other uses—to see if they shrink the tumor.

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Mount Sinai Featured on CNBC’s Squawk Box

“Philanthropy in an academic medical center such as the Mount Sinai Health System helps improve patient care and provides necessary funding for the innovative treatments that answer society’s pressing health care needs,” according to leaders of Mount Sinai, who recently appeared on a special edition of CNBC’s television show Squawk Box to discuss their support.

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New Findings from Mount Sinai’s Seaver Autism Center

The most recent study from the Seaver Autism Center at Mount Sinai draws a possible link between the genetic abnormalities attributed to autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and dysregulation of the mechanism by which unused neural connections are pruned during development. This information builds upon prior discoveries at the Seaver Center, which identified three kinds of genetic mutations that are believed to contribute to autism risk: de novo mutations; recessive or X-linked mutations; and small chromosomal abnormalities.

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Studying the Effect of Vitamin E on Functional Decline in Alzheimer’s Disease

Functional decline, measured as the loss of ability to accomplish activities of daily living, such as bathing and dressing, planning or cooking a meal, and paying bills, is the major symptom in individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and the primary source of caregiver burden. Yet, few studies have focused on ways to slow this functional decline.

In a recently published study in The Journal of the American Medical Association, researchers, co-led by an investigator from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, reported that vitamin E, also known as alpha tocopherol, reduced functional decline in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s disease.

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