Kravis Children’s Hospital Achieves Major Gains in National Rankings

Kravis Children’s Hospital at Mount Sinai is again ranked among the nation’s top pediatric centers in seven of the ten specialties measured by U.S. News & World Report in its 2015-16 “Best Children’s Hospitals” guidebook. Notably, for the first time, Kravis Children’s Hospital achieved Top 20 rankings—and did so in two areas, pulmonology and nephrology—and is again ranked for cancer. Other specialties also made significant gains this year. Read more

East Side Endoscopy Helps the Underserved

East Side Endoscopy, LLC, an affiliate of Mount Sinai Beth Israel, provided 253 free colonoscopies to underserved patients in New York City last year, through its special charity program that was established in 2012 in partnership with the American Cancer Society and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The East Side Endoscopy Charity Program serves patients with no insurance and limited access to health care who otherwise would not seek screening services. Read more

Focusing on “Women in Science”

During the 2015 World Science Festival held recently in New York City, the Mount Sinai Health System sponsored a roundtable discussion titled, “Spotlight: Women in Science,” featuring four trailblazers from diverse disciplines, including Patricia Kovatch, Founding Associate Dean for Scientific Computing at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. In a casual setting complete with cocktails and hors d’oeuvres, Ms. Kovatch and her three co-panelists—anthropologist Dean Falk, PhD; marine chemical biologist Mandë Holford, PhD; and space scientist Tara M. Ruttley, PhD—discussed their life’s work, what inspires them, and their triumphs and challenges.

Hundreds Get Free Blood Pressure Check

Several hundred people received free blood pressure screenings at different locations throughout the Mount Sinai Health System in May, during National High Blood Pressure Education Month. Regular screenings are an important step in helping to control high blood pressure, which is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease and stroke, but often has no warning signs. Mount Sinai Heart hosted the screenings and distributed educational information at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, The Mount Sinai Hospital, Mount Sinai Beth Israel Brooklyn, and Mount Sinai Queens.

Mount Sinai Team Walks to Fight AIDS

Under blue skies, 80 staff members, families, and friends from the Institute for Advanced Medicine and the Mount Sinai Health System HIV service line participated in the 30th Annual 10K AIDS Walk New York in Central Park on Sunday, May 17.

The Mount Sinai team raised $7,226 to help support HIV/AIDS services, treatment, and research, and joined 40 other tri-state-area AIDS service organizations in the walk. Since its founding, AIDS Walk New York has drawn nearly 890,000 participants and raised more than $139 million.

LASIK Center Opens

The Laser Vision Correction Center at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai—the first refractive surgery center within the Mount Sinai Health System—recently celebrated its opening. Located at 230 Second Avenue, the new facility offers photorefractive keratectomy, custom LASIK, and IntraLASIK—the first blade-free laser technology that enables physicians to customize vision correction for each patient. Laser vision correction, also known as refractive surgery, treats nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism, helping to eliminate the need for eyeglasses and contact lenses for many patients. The surgery corrects vision by changing the shape of the cornea, the transparent layer that covers the outer surface of the eye.

A Social Media Guideline For Physicians: Should Joining Twitter Be a Professional Priority?

There are thousands of physicians, medical students and other health care professionals on Twitter, but many individuals are afraid to join Twitter because of the unknowns and potential pitfalls. Here are 5 reasons medical professionals are apprehensive about utilizing Twitter and why you should join anyway.

1. You’re nervous you’ll post something stupid.

This one is easy. Don’t post anything you don’t want the whole world to see. Twitter is a public forum and anything you post is public, searchable, and re-tweetable. Yes, you can delete a post, but it may be too late. For example, someone could have already taken a screenshot of the tweet, or have the tweet text saved in their email notifications. But this shouldn’t scare you. Before posting things on Twitter, you first have to join and see how other people use Twitter. Once you have a feel for it, go ahead and post. You can start off by posting general information, and once you are comfortable with this medium you can start conversing with others and giving opinions. And yes, always think twice before you post anything. Read more

Mount Sinai Embraces a New Era in Digital Health Care

A new telehealth initiative run by the Mount Sinai Health System allows patients and their primary care physicians to hold “virtual” appointments or videoconferences for nonurgent follow-up visits. Designed to improve care and enhance convenience, the program can be accessed through an iPhone or Android smartphone app. It is expected to be particularly beneficial for patients with chronic illnesses who require medical management, or those with nonurgent infections—an upper respiratory illness, for example—who require follow-up care. Read more