Hernia Facts and Treatments

Merriam Webster defines a hernia as “a protrusion of an organ or part of an organ (as the intestine) through connective tissue or through a wall of the cavity (as of the abdomen) in which it is normally enclosed.” A ventral hernia arises in the abdominal wall because a weakness or defect in the abdominal muscles causes the intestines and other abdominal contents to push through. The weakness can be congenital, or it may be caused by aging or injury (i.e., surgical incision).

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Cleft and Craniofacial Myths

July is Cleft and Craniofacial Awareness Month. Here are the most common myths about this disease that I hear from my patients.

Myth:

Children with clefts and craniofacial anomalies do not require specialty care.

Reality:

Patients born with a birth defect involving the head and neck should be seen soon after birth – either in the hospital at the time of delivery or soon after discharge as an outpatient – by a team of expert clinicians from different specialties. In this type of setting, the clinical team can assess what problems exist and how best to improve them.

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October is National Liver Cancer Awareness Month

Liver cancer may be less well-known than other cancer types, but it is the fifth most common cancer in the world.  And despite progress in other fields, liver cancer is one of the few cancers whose rate in the United States is continuing to rise.  Liver cancer, whose medical term is hepatocellular carcinoma, is tumor that starts in the liver and can spread to other organs if left untreated.

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New Discoveries in Head and Neck Cancers

Shutting down inflammation within the body, and then harnessing the immune system to recognize and destroy cancer cells, could provide the one-two punch needed to effectively treat head and neck cancers, according to researchers at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Research into the pivotal role played by the inflammatory molecule inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in promoting cancer growth and immune evasion is being led by Andrew G. Sikora, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor and Director of Head and Neck Translational Research in the Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery.

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Mount Sinai Saved My Life

My name is Loren Ridinger and I was diagnosed with and underwent brain surgery for a brain aneurysm, all within a couple months. I am so grateful to Mount Sinai, Dr. Joshua Bederson, and Dr. Aman Patel for saving my life; for saving my life; over 30,000 people die each year from ruptured aneurysms and I could have been one of them if it wasn’t for this hospital and its amazing doctors.

Don’t settle for less than the best when it comes to your health. You have to be your biggest advocate – there is nothing more important! Be persistent! I had learned to live with vertigo for years because every doctor I went to said there was “nothing wrong” with me. Remember that they are practitioners, not perfect, and only you know what’s happening to your body. After demanding an MRI and then an MRA (similar to an MRI except it focuses on your arteries) and learning that I had an 8.5 mm aneurysm of my internal carotid artery behind my left eye, I went from doctor to doctor and different hospitals trying to figure out what came next.

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