Using Virtual-Reality Simulation to Improve Brain Surgery Outcomes

Virtual-reality simulation, designed to improve outcomes and reduce complications in patients undergoing brain surgery, is being pioneered at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai as an innovative training tool for neurosurgery residents and as a program to help experienced surgeons advance their skill-sets.

Read more

October is National Liver Cancer Awareness Month

Liver cancer may be less well-known than other cancer types, but it is the fifth most common cancer in the world.  And despite progress in other fields, liver cancer is one of the few cancers whose rate in the United States is continuing to rise.  Liver cancer, whose medical term is hepatocellular carcinoma, is tumor that starts in the liver and can spread to other organs if left untreated.

Read more

New Discoveries in Head and Neck Cancers

Shutting down inflammation within the body, and then harnessing the immune system to recognize and destroy cancer cells, could provide the one-two punch needed to effectively treat head and neck cancers, according to researchers at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Research into the pivotal role played by the inflammatory molecule inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in promoting cancer growth and immune evasion is being led by Andrew G. Sikora, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor and Director of Head and Neck Translational Research in the Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery.

Read more

Mount Sinai Saved My Life

My name is Loren Ridinger and I was diagnosed with and underwent brain surgery for a brain aneurysm, all within a couple months. I am so grateful to Mount Sinai and Dr. Aman Patel for saving my life; over 30,000 people die each year from ruptured aneurysms and I could have been one of them if it wasn’t for this hospital and its amazing doctors.

Don’t settle for less than the best when it comes to your health. You have to be your biggest advocate – there is nothing more important! Be persistent! I had learned to live with vertigo for years because every doctor I went to said there was “nothing wrong” with me. Remember that they are practitioners, not perfect, and only you know what’s happening to your body. After demanding an MRI and then an MRA (similar to an MRI except it focuses on your arteries) and learning that I had an 8.5 mm aneurysm of my internal carotid artery behind my left eye, I went from doctor to doctor and different hospitals trying to figure out what came next.

Read more