Researchers Identify Genes That Predict Damage in Donated Kidneys

HI_RES_MURPHY (1)Kidney transplantation is the most common type of organ transplant surgery in the United States with over 17,000 kidney transplantations performed in 2014, according to the National Kidney Foundation. However, long-term survival still remains a challenge. While there is no actual crystal ball to predict whether a transplanted kidney will later develop fibrosis – a chronic injury that is a major cause of allograft loss after the first year – a team of researchers, led by Mount Sinai’s Barbara Murphy, MD, System Chair, Department of Medicine, Murray M. Rosenberg Professor of Medicine, Dean for Clinical Integration and Population Health, has identified a panel of 13 genes that does just that. These recently discovered 13 genes are highly predictive of decline in renal function and eventual loss of transplanted kidneys. Read more

Medical Students Dared to Enter the Tank

Mount Sinai School of Medicine Photo by Robert Caplin

Joseph Mari, Susan Lerner, MD,; and Marc Napp, MD grill the medical students after hearing their patient safety and quality care improvement proposals.

InFocus 7 at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai culminated with third-year medical students participating in the School’s first Med Ed Tank—a series of student pitches modeled after the popular ABC television series “Shark Tank.” InFocus weeks are part of the School’s new MD Program curriculum, where students are immersed in innovative courses outside of the classroom to focus their training on research methods, global health, service learning, leadership, scientific innovation, and patient safety and quality care—the latter being the focus for InFocus 7. Read more

Bringing Women’s Healthcare to Sex Workers: An impromptu meeting

Guest post by Molly Lieber, LMSW, MPH, Project Manager of the Division of Global Women’s Health in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Science at The Mount Sinai Hospital.

Dr. Ann Marie Beddoe in Liberia.

 Ann Marie Beddoe, MD, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Science at The Mount Sinai Hospital.

Our Director, Dr. Ann Marie Beddoe, has traveled to Liberia, a small country in West Africa, for the past 9 years.  With a focus on gynecologic oncology, Dr. Beddoe has been focused on the continuum of care for women with cancer.  Specifically, she has worked to advocate for increased cervical cancer screening, trained local health care workers to diagnose and treat women with cancer, and has provided both chemotherapy and surgery to local patients.  Read more

Honoring a Legend in Environmental Health

Honoring a Legend in Environmental Health

Under a photograph of the late Irving J. Selikoff, MD, Philip J. Landrigan, MD, MSc, and Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney display a Congressional Tribute to Mount Sinai for its leadership in environmental health.

Government officials, visiting physicians, and members of the Mount Sinai Health System recently gathered at a symposium honoring a seminal figure in environmental medicine—the late Irving J. Selikoff, MD—and to celebrate the renovation of Mount Sinai’s Selikoff Centers for Environmental Health. The Selikoff Centers treat thousands of patients each year for World Trade Center-related health issues and other work-related illnesses and injuries.

At the symposium, sponsored by Mount Sinai’s Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, U.S. Representative Carolyn B. Maloney (D-NY), a champion of workers’ health, presented Mount Sinai with a Congressional Tribute for being the “birthplace of environmental health and a leader in the United States in this research.” Read more

A Focus on the Environmental Impact on Health

Robert O. Wright, MD, MPH

For the past 20 years, the nation’s vast scientific resources have been spent unraveling the human genome. This emphasis now includes the genome’s environmental equivalent—the exposome—as well. At the Mount Sinai Health System, research into the exposome is being led by Robert O. Wright, MD, MPH, Ethel H. Wise Professor of Community Medicine, and the newly named Chair of Preventive Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Read more

Noted Surgeon, Writer Delivers Lecture on “Being Mortal”

Before a capacity audience in Stern Auditorium that included faculty, staff, students, and the public, Atul Gawande, MD, MPH, noted surgeon, writer, and public health researcher, recently presented a professional overview—yet highly personalized account—of modern medicine’s impact on how we age, and die, in the twenty-first century. His speech, titled “Being Mortal,” based on his book, Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End, was delivered as the 2015 Annual Douglas West Memorial Lecture, an event sponsored by Mount Sinai’s Lilian and Benjamin Hertzberg Palliative Care Institute. Read more

Around the Health System

Mount Sinai Queens Community Health Fair Draws 900 Attendees

Mount Sinai Queens and the United Community Civic Association co-hosted a daylong neighborhood health fair at Kaufman Astoria Studios on Saturday, June 6, attracting some 900 attendees. Mount Sinai Queens staff offered a wide range of free health screenings, including glucose, cholesterol, blood pressure, asthma, and osteoporosis. They also measured body mass index and provided information on weight control, stress management, and smoking cessation and prevention. Attendees enjoyed free, healthy snacks from the hospital chef, family fun activities, and entertainment. Read more

Educating the Public About Stroke

Carolyn Brockington, MD, a board-certified vascular neurologist and Director of the Stroke Center at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai Roosevelt, is actively involved in educating the public about all aspects of stroke-—from its symptoms to its prevention and treatment.

“Most people do not realize anyone can have a stroke at any age, but the good news is many strokes can be prevented,” Dr. Brockington says. “The key lies in identifying and successfully controlling the risk factors with lifestyle changes like diet, exercise, and possibly medication.” Read more

Tips for Avoiding Eye Infections from Contact Lenses

A new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported millions of Americans may be suffering from keratitis, an infection of the cornea, caused by improper handling of contact lenses. According to the CDC, wearing lenses too long and not cleaning them properly are the most common underlying factors of eye infections in the estimated 38 million Americans who wear contact lenses.

“Bacterial keratitis is usually treated with antibiotic drops and may require multiple return visits to your ophthalmologist,” says Marina Grapp, OD, Director, Specialty Contact Lens Service, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, “But the infection is easily avoidable with proper use.”

During Contact Lens Health Week, Dr. Grapp offers some tips for avoiding contact lens-related eye infections:

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