Are Sure You Know What Kind of “Doctor” is Treating You?

If you are not certain who is treating you, ask!!!

We are familiar with M.D. and D.O. (physicians). Many other clinicians are called doctor such as your dentist (D.M.D.), podiatrist (D.P.M.), optometrist (O.D.) and chiropractor (D.C.).

Read this from the New York Times:

“Hi. I’m Dr. Patti McCarver, and I’m your nurse,” she said. And with that, Dr. McCarver stuck a scope in Ms. Cassidy’s ear, noticed a buildup of fluid and prescribed an allergy medicine. It was something that will become increasingly routine for patients: a someone who is not a physician using the title of doctor. Dr. McCarver calls herself a doctor because she returned to school to earn a doctorate last year, one of thousands of nurses doing the same recently. Doctorates are popping up all over the health professions, and the result is a quiet battle over not only the title “doctor,” but also the money, power and prestige that often come with it.”

Read more

Why Don’t Patients Remind Medical Professionals to Wash Their Hands?

I ask this question to every clinician examining me, doing a procedure on me, or drawing blood from me. Physicians. Dentists. Phlebotomists. Radiology techs. PTs.

And I prefer they wash their hands in front of me. Proper hand washing is the single most effective preventive medicine measure.

Recently a Bloomberg News article explained why it is important to remind clinicians to wash their hands. “Physicians shouldn’t take offense. We all can benefit from reminders about the basics. Years of education and expertise don’t mean that medical professionals aren’t human, and may sometimes forget a step in even routine procedures.”

Read more

Compliance for Influenza Vaccinations Sets Record

After launching a much-publicized campaign in October to promote the influenza vaccination for faculty, staff, and students, the Mount Sinai Health System will report a record rate of vaccination compliance to the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) for the 2013 – 2014 influenza season.

Typically, vaccination rates for health care workers are around 60 percent, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Health System’s overall compliance rate was 82 percent at the start of April.

Read more

Mount Sinai Student’s Scholarly Year in Haiti

On January 12th, 2010 when a catastrophic magnitude 7.0 earthquake hit Haiti, Ernest Barthelemy was half way through his second of medical school at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. The earthquake that devastated Haiti hit Ernest in every way, from the personal casualties within his family to its spiritual implications for his cultural identity to an eventual redefinition of his professional medical career.

Read more

5 Tips for Breast Cancer Prevention

According to the American Institute for Cancer Research, about one third of cancers in high-income countries can be attributed to preventable factors such as nutrition and physical activity. In the United States, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women, astoundingly impacting one in every eight women in their lifetimes.

At this time, we don’t know exactly why many women develop breast cancer, but the following tips from the Dubin Breast Center’s Clinical Nutrition Coordinator Alexandra Rothwell, RD, can help to reduce your risk for cancer and may help to prevent recurrence among cancer survivors.

Read more

Influenza Vaccinations Available for Mount Sinai Health System Staff

All faculty, staff, and students throughout the Mount Sinai Health System are expected to get an annual influenza vaccination, a request that has new urgency this year. For the first time, the New York State Department of Health is requiring that all hospital personnel either receive the influenza vaccination or wear masks in areas where there is potential for patient contact, including lobbies, corridors, elevators, and cafeterias, as well as in all typical patient-care areas. This new regulation will be in effect throughout the influenza season, which typically runs from December to late spring.

Read more

Study Finds Marijuana Can Be Harmful to Youngsters

A growing body of evidence suggests that the use of marijuana, or cannabis, can negatively impact the developing brains of approximately one in four adolescents, according to researchers at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and the University of Montreal.

The study, published in the August 16, 2013, issue of Neuropharmacology, highlights that the younger the user of cannabis, the more susceptible he or she is to delinquency, lower educational attainment, difficulty in conforming to an adult role, and mental health issues.

Read more