Medical Students Celebrate Match Day 2016

Medical Students Celebrate Match Day 2016

Celebrating their residency matches were, from left: Sonia Yen Jarrett, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (Pediatrics); Jake Goldman Prigoff, NewYork Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center (General Surgery); and Adam Fields, Brigham and Women’s Hospital (General Surgery).

The upbeat dance-pop song “Feel This Moment” was playing at full volume in the Annenberg West lobby on Friday, March 18, as graduating medical students opened their envelopes to learn which residency programs they would be attending during the next phase of their training. Joining them were family members, friends, and Mount Sinai Health System physicians and staff who shared in their energy and excitement, and offered hugs and congratulations during the annual Match Day event.

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai’s graduating students were matched to residency programs throughout the country, including highly competitive ones at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Yale-New Haven Hospital, Duke University Medical Center, and University of California San Francisco Medical Center. Fifty one students will remain within the Mount Sinai Health System to continue all or part of their graduate training. Read more

Update on Bias and Racism

David Muller, MD

David Muller, MD

Dear students,

We continue to make incremental progress in addressing racism and bias on our campus and in our clinical environments. Below is a list of major initiatives and events since our last update: Read more

Update on Bias and Racism

David Muller, MD

David Muller, MD

Thank you to all who participated in the recent Town Hall and small group meetings. You’ve helped us better define our goals and contributed excellent suggestions, many of which are being incorporated into the interventions we plan to implement. I want to start this update with a statement of purpose that will continue to be refined over time, will help us clarify our vision and focus our efforts.

“Our goal is to undo racism in all its forms at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. For the past year this has been among our highest priorities and it will remain so for the foreseeable future.”

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Update on Bias and Racism

David Muller, MD

David Muller, MD

Dear students,

A lot has happened since our last update on ISMMS’s race and bias initiatives. The teaching faculty, administrative staff, and leadership of Icahn School of Medicine have an unwavering commitment to addressing these issues, and to working closely with students so that our efforts are transparent and accountable to all. Read more

Update on Bias and Racism

David Muller, MD

David Muller, MD

Over the past year there has been an increased urgency surrounding issues related to bias and racism in society at large, within our own medical school and health system and, tragically, for some of us in our own lives and families.

We’re sending this note to update the Sinai community on our ongoing efforts to eliminate bias and racism at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and our health system. We also want to acknowledge the extraordinary and meaningful work that our students are doing to bring these issues to light. As has always been the case, it is our students who are leading the charge, and who are determined to effect change both locally and globally. In particular, the Anti-Racism Coalition (ARC) and the LGBTQ student groups have inspired much of this work. Read more

Students Celebrate Match Day 2015

The excitement was palpable as Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai’s 129 graduating students filled the Annenberg West lobby on Friday, March 20, to open their envelopes and learn which residency programs they would be attending during the next step of their medical training. Many family members, friends, and Mount Sinai Health System physicians were on hand to lend their support and cheer them on during such a milestone event. Read more

Reforming Medical Education

Pre-med education is fundamentally flawed. This is something that the Medical Education community has known and written about for decades but has never acted upon. There are three critical problems:

  • Pre-med science requirements were established almost 100 years ago and have not changed since then despite extraordinary advances in clinical medicine and biomedical science.
  • These requirements consume an enormous amount of time and energy, detracting severely from what should be an enriching, stimulating college education.
  • The Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) is an expensive (between the tests fees and pre courses), time-consuming hurdle that perpetuates the need to focus on memorization of facts and competition for grades.

More than 100 years ago, Abraham Flexner reformed medical education throughout the nation. He was considered visionary and is responsible for establishing what we currently consider to be the gold standard for how medicine is taught, both in medical school and in preparing for medical school. Since then, medicine and science have changed more rapidly than any other field, with the possible exception of information technology. Yet educators at both the college and medical school levels have failed to refresh his vision and align the physician training with society’s needs. We’ve also perpetuated the notion that everyone has to be taught the same requirements in lockstep, with little room for flexible, individualized, and self-directed learning.

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Ultraportable Ultrasound Introduced to Medical Education Curriculum

Ultraportable Ultrasound Device made available to Icahn School of Medicine students and trainees

This article was written by Alexa Mieses, a first-year medical student, and first published in The Rossi: Medical Student Quarterly Report.

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is known for innovation within the realms of patient care, research, and medical education. Training future physicians requires a commitment to progress, and the newest addition to the medical school’s curriculum is no exception: In the spring of 2013, handheld ultrasound will be introduced to enhance students’ and trainees’ clinical skills and generation of a differential diagnosis by reinforcing anatomic and physiologic principles.

Unlike traditional ultrasound, bedside ultrasound is performed at the point of care, not in an imaging suite. Handheld ultrasound – an even more recent technology – is small enough to fit in the palm of a hand, with a screen roughly the size of a smart phone.  Compared to traditional ultrasound, these devices are more portable and less expensive, although the quality of image may be compromised.

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