Mount Sinai Presents Groundbreaking Findings on Heart Procedure

In a groundbreaking, multi-centered randomized trial published in The New England Journal of Medicine, researchers, co-led by Mount Sinai’s David H. Adams, MD, determined that a catheter-based heart procedure to replace an aortic valve was superior to surgery for patients who have symptomatic severe aortic stenosis with increased risks. The findings, based on a clinical trial involving 795 patients treated at 45 institutions across the nation, were simultaneously presented by Dr. Adams at the 63rd Annual Scientific Session of the American College of Cardiology on Saturday, March 29, and represent a major advance for heart patients who are at high risk for surgery.

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Blazing a New Trail in the Treatment of Heart Disease

An injectable nanoparticle that delivers HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, or statins, which directly inhibit atherosclerotic plaque inflammation could represent a new frontier in the treatment of heart disease. This novel approach is being developed by researchers at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, who have seen promising results in mice models and plan to translate their findings to humans within the next few years.

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Expertise in Mitral Valve Repair

Mitral Valve Prolapse (MVP) is a common heart valve abnormality that affects up to 5 percent of the U.S. population. The mitral valve controls the flow of blood from the lungs to the main pumping chamber of the heart. MVP results from a degeneration of valve structure that leads to a regurgitation of blood backwards that can result in heart enlargement and weakening, as well as fatigue and shortness of breath.

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A Leader in Cardiovascular Care for HIV Patients

What started as a casual observation among physicians almost a decade ago—that patients with HIV tend to develop hypertension and have a greater risk of heart attacks than the general population—has become a formal area of study and treatment within the Mount Sinai Health System.

Under the direction of Merle Myerson, MD, EdD, Director of the St. Luke’s Roosevelt Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, and Director of the Cardiology Section of the Spencer Cox Center for Health, patients with HIV are being closely monitored and treated for heart disease and stroke. In fact, cardiovascular care has become increasingly critical to the overall health of HIV patients, as more of them live well into their 70s and 80s.

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Mount Sinai is First to Use a New Device for Clearing Calcified Arteries

Interventional cardiologists at The Mount Sinai Hospital in October became the first in the world to use a new device to remove hard calcium buildup in a coronary artery in preparation for the placement of a stent to improve blood flow through the artery. The device, the Diamondback 360® Coronary Orbital Atherectomy System, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration one day before it was brought to Mount Sinai for use.

Since then, Mount Sinai’s cardiac catheterization team has performed more than 25 procedures under the leadership of Samin K. Sharma, MD, Director of Clinical and Interventional Cardiology at The Mount Sinai Hospital. Dr. Sharma says there have been no complications during or after the procedures.

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Celebrating Heart Health Month

Amid festive red and white balloons, and samples of heart-healthy and tasty pasta dishes, salads, and desserts, more than 500 individuals from Mount Sinai and the community attended a Mount Sinai health fair in Guggenheim Pavilion on Friday, February 1. The event was part of the American Heart Association’s annual Go Red for Women® campaign that educates women about cardiovascular risks.

A special feature of this year’s health fair was the launch of H.A.P.P.Y. (Heart Attack Prevention Program for You), a cardiovascular screening and follow-up consultation program for all Mount Sinai employees that will continue to be offered over the coming months by Mount Sinai’s Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory.

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Mount Sinai Advances Research into Diabetes and Heart Disease

Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart, presented landmark research on diabetes and heart disease at the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2012. During the conference, the AHA also honored Dr. Fuster with its 2012 Research Achievement Award for his many significant contributions to cardiovascular medicine.

“With a laser-like focus on translational research, Dr. Fuster has added greatly to our understanding of the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease and thrombosis,” says AHA President Donna Arnett, PhD, MSPH. “Among his laboratory’s provocative advancements in medical science are numerous ‘firsts,’ including the original understanding of the role of platelets in heart disease and the revelation that plaque composition plays a crucial role in propensity for a heart lesion to rupture.”

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Mount Sinai Surgeons Implant Portable Artificial Heart

When Daquain Jenkins, 29, left The Mount Sinai Hospital last year, he became the first patient in the New York metropolitan area to return home to await a heart transplant with the assistance of a portable artificial heart.

The milestone was remarkable in a number of ways. First, the Total Artificial Heart, manufactured by SynCardia Systems, Inc., in Tucson, Arizona, replaces both failing heart ventricles and four heart valves, eliminating end-stage biventricular failure. It is immediately available to patients, and serves as a bridge while they await a suitable heart donor. In addition, it allows patients to move freely and manage everyday chores while wearing a backpack that stores the 13.5-pound battery-driven device.

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