Mount Sinai Goes Red for Women

On February 6, 2015, Mount Sinai Heart’s Magnet recognized nurses partnered once again with the American Heart Association and other Departments at The Mount Sinai Hospital to organize and host the annual “Go Red for Women” Community Heart Health Fair with free screenings. February is “American Heart Month” and every year for the past 13 years, Mount Sinai Heart’s nurses have been the driving force behind the Go Red for Women health screening, which is aimed at raising awareness of heart disease among women.

This year Go Red health fair events were offered at five health system locations: The Mount Sinai Hospital, Mount Sinai Queens, Mount Sinai Saint Luke’s, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, and Mount Sinai Beth Israel in Brooklyn. Read more

Women Need to Know Their Risks for Heart Disease

Heart disease, stroke, and cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death in women. While awareness has doubled over the last 15 years, still only 56 percent of women identified heart disease as the leading cause of death in a 2012 survey by the American Heart Association.

One in three women dies from heart attack and stroke, but many of these deaths can be prevented. Women often come to the emergency room too late because they attributed their symptoms to less life-threatening conditions like acid reflux or the flu.

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Helping More Patients Survive Heart Attacks

Everyone needs to remember when it comes to heart attack, time is muscle. If you are feeling chest pain, don’t hesitate to call 9-1-1.

Our heart teams at Mount Sinai know that improving heart attack patient survival is all about teamwork and timing. The team includes the dispatchers, paramedics, FDNY, hospital teams, emergency room staff, and interventional cardiologists who are working together to reduce wait times in emergency rooms and speed communication to get a patient to the catheterization laboratory as fast as possible to open a blocked heart artery. The goal timing is for less than 90 minutes. Read more

Teaching Heart-Healthy Habits to High-Risk Children and Families

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has received a $3.8 million grant from the American Heart Association (AHA) to promote cardiovascular health through early education and intervention programs targeting high-risk children and their parents in Harlem and the Bronx.

Mount Sinai researchers will study the genes and lifestyles of 600 preschoolers and their parents or guardians who live in these communities, which are associated with high rates of obesity, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. The investigators will track whether the interventions lead to healthier eating habits and additional exercise. They will also examine the participants’ DNA and RNA to understand how genetics plays a role in the development of cardiovascular disease.

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A Best Practice Is Not Always Evidence-Based!

“Faster care hasn’t cut heart attack deaths in hospitals.”

A USA Today article noted “The Medicare metric for timely heart attack treatment is … “door-to-balloon” time — the time between when a heart attack patient arrives in the ER and when the balloon angiography begins — researchers found that the percentage of heart attack patients who die while in the hospital, about 5%, hasn’t changed.”

“Irreversible damage from a heart attack can begin in 30 minutes. Most tissue death occurs in the first two to three hours…” “A new study suggests that speeding up hospital care isn’t enough to save lives … A better predictor of survival might be ‘symptom to balloon time’…”

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“Heart Disease And Cardiovascular Disease, In General, Is A Function Of Age…and The Guidelines Say Let’s Treat Them.”

“Do you really need to treat all of these patients?”

Modern Healthcare article reported that: “ More than half of adults between ages 40 and 75 who need help managing cholesterol would be eligible for statin therapy for the prevention of heart disease on the basis of the newest American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association guidelines…The new guidelines have the potential to increase the net number of new statin prescriptions by 12.8 million.”

“With more than 115 million U.S. adults estimated to be between the ages of 40 and 75, the analysis suggests the total number of potential statin users could expand to 56 million, and the majority would be above age 60.”

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Mount Sinai Presents Groundbreaking Findings on Heart Procedure

In a groundbreaking, multi-centered randomized trial published in The New England Journal of Medicine, researchers, co-led by Mount Sinai’s David H. Adams, MD, determined that a catheter-based heart procedure to replace an aortic valve was superior to surgery for patients who have symptomatic severe aortic stenosis with increased risks. The findings, based on a clinical trial involving 795 patients treated at 45 institutions across the nation, were simultaneously presented by Dr. Adams at the 63rd Annual Scientific Session of the American College of Cardiology on Saturday, March 29, and represent a major advance for heart patients who are at high risk for surgery.

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Blazing a New Trail in the Treatment of Heart Disease

An injectable nanoparticle that delivers HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, or statins, which directly inhibit atherosclerotic plaque inflammation could represent a new frontier in the treatment of heart disease. This novel approach is being developed by researchers at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, who have seen promising results in mice models and plan to translate their findings to humans within the next few years.

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