Mount Sinai Beth Israel Employees Receive Heart Awards

Eleven Mount Sinai Beth Israel employees received a 2015 Heart Award, one of the institution’s highest honors, at a breakfast reception on Thursday, April 30, at Podell Auditorium, Petrie Campus. The award recognizes employees—nominated and selected by peers—who make outstanding contributions that help staff provide the highest quality care for patients, with a special focus on compassion and concern for their well-being. Mount Sinai Beth Israel President Susan Somerville, RN, congratulated the 2015 awardees at the reception.

Pioneering Surgical Techniques to Benefit Stroke Patients

A 37-year-old devoted runner, Cory Root, PhD, seemed an unlikely candidate for an acute stroke. But in the midst of a seven-mile jog along the Hudson River in early March, he suddenly felt weak and began to drag his foot. After he fell and struggled to get up, several onlookers rushed to his side. “They thought I showed signs of a stroke and called an ambulance,” recalls Dr. Root, a postdoctoral fellow in neuroscience at Columbia University. “I thought that was crazy because I was too young for a stroke.” Read more

A Leader in Stroke Treatment and Prevention

The Mount Sinai Hospital, a leader in stroke treatment—and the first Joint Commission-certified comprehensive stroke center in New York State—continues to push the boundaries of research and clinical care.

“We have won high marks for the rapid response we’re able to deliver, particularly to complex stroke patients who need endovascular intervention, and for our commitment to community outreach and education,” says Stanley Tuhrim, MD, Professor and Vice Chair of Clinical Affairs, Department of Neurology, and Director of the Stroke Center at The Mount Sinai Hospital. Read more

Leadership and Staff Celebrate National Walking Day

Hundreds of Mount Sinai Health System employees laced up their sneakers and participated in several 30-minute, lunchtime walks in their hospital campus communities on Wednesday, April 1, for National Walking Day, to raise awareness of the health benefits of walking for cardiovascular health. Beth Oliver, DNP, RN, Vice President of Cardiac Services for the Mount Sinai Health System, set the tone for the day, saying, “Mount Sinai is committed to teaming up to get active and make strides against cardiovascular diseases. A simple 30-minute brisk walk each day can significantly impact and improve heart health and longevity.” Walking, she says, can help individuals lower risk of heart attacks and strokes, maintain normal blood pressure, reduce cholesterol, and prevent diabetes and obesity.

Saving Hearts by Eating Right

Harlem Healthy Hearts (HHH) recently kicked off its monthly series of workshops with “Saving Hearts by Eating Right” at the Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Community Center on West 134th Street. The event included screenings for blood pressure, blood sugar, cholesterol, and weight, and gave participants heart-healthy cookbooks, pedometers, and brochures. Read more

Mount Sinai Goes Red for Women

On February 6, 2015, Mount Sinai Heart’s Magnet recognized nurses partnered once again with the American Heart Association and other Departments at The Mount Sinai Hospital to organize and host the annual “Go Red for Women” Community Heart Health Fair with free screenings. February is “American Heart Month” and every year for the past 13 years, Mount Sinai Heart’s nurses have been the driving force behind the Go Red for Women health screening, which is aimed at raising awareness of heart disease among women.

This year Go Red health fair events were offered at five health system locations: The Mount Sinai Hospital, Mount Sinai Queens, Mount Sinai Saint Luke’s, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, and Mount Sinai Beth Israel in Brooklyn. Read more

Women Need to Know Their Risks for Heart Disease

Heart disease, stroke, and cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death in women. While awareness has doubled over the last 15 years, still only 56 percent of women identified heart disease as the leading cause of death in a 2012 survey by the American Heart Association.

One in three women dies from heart attack and stroke, but many of these deaths can be prevented. Women often come to the emergency room too late because they attributed their symptoms to less life-threatening conditions like acid reflux or the flu.

Read more

Helping More Patients Survive Heart Attacks

Everyone needs to remember when it comes to heart attack, time is muscle. If you are feeling chest pain, don’t hesitate to call 9-1-1.

Our heart teams at Mount Sinai know that improving heart attack patient survival is all about teamwork and timing. The team includes the dispatchers, paramedics, FDNY, hospital teams, emergency room staff, and interventional cardiologists who are working together to reduce wait times in emergency rooms and speed communication to get a patient to the catheterization laboratory as fast as possible to open a blocked heart artery. The goal timing is for less than 90 minutes. Read more