Fall Allergies Versus a Cold: Tips on How to Tell the Difference

As we head through fall and on toward winter, it’s the time of year when you might start to have the sniffles, sneezing, or a cough. But what is it? Fall allergies? A cold?

Sujan Patel, MD, Assistant Professor of Allergy and Immunology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, says “Many symptoms of the common cold and fall allergies can overlap, leaving patients confused as to the best course of treatment. But there are some simple ways to tell these different conditions apart.”

Dr. Patel shares some tips on how to tell the difference between fall allergies and colds by the most common symptoms of each:

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Five Common Running Mistakes: How to Optimize Your Running Experience

With the New York City Marathon fast approaching this Sunday, many may be inspired to lace up their sneakers and get to running. Running is a great way to get exercise while exploring the city however, below are five of the most common mistakes made by runners.

Improper Shoes

Most novice runners lace up an old pair of sneakers and start to run but, this has many pitfalls. The type of shoe you wear has to be right for your individual foot. It also should not be worn out, as that will change the biomechanics of the shoe/run dynamic. It is best to go to a specialty running store, where a knowledgeable salesperson can evaluate your foot type, and inward foot movement, to see if you are an over-pronator, under-pronator or a neutral runner – each type of foot requires a different shoe type. It is also important to then replace the shoe every 300 miles, or when you can visibly notice wear on the bottom of the shoe.

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Don’t Get Tricked By Too Many Treats!

Not only is Halloween candy lining drugstore aisles, but it seems to have taken residence at the workplace (those pesky candy dishes!), supermarket shelves and even the doctor’s office. The holiday of ghouls and goblins not only brings plenty of tricks and scary costumes, but it signifies the start to a holiday season filled with treats. Healthy habits you’ve worked so hard to instill can fall by the wayside as Halloween candy transitions to pecan pie, Christmas cookies and fruitcakes. The good news is that we’re here to help you navigate the holidays and help you maintain a healthy balance. First up: Halloween!

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Homemade, Health-Promoting Nut Milk (Recipe Included!)

Breast Cancer Awareness Month comes to us in October, a time when the cooling weather and change in seasonal produce lead us to reach for our favorite fall comfort foods. Spiced ciders, doughnuts, and pumpkin everything are a few of the season’s best indulgences, but as indulgences they should remain, or we’ll find ourselves entering the holidays with bloated stomachs and ill-fitting clothes.

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1881 – Assassination of President Garfield

“What Dr. Towsend did next was something that Joseph Lister, despite years spent traveling the world, proving the source of infection and pleading with physicians to sterilize their hands and instruments, had been unable to prevent. As the president lay on the train station floor, one of the most germ-infested environments imaginable, Towsend inserted an unsterilized finger into the would in his back, causing a small hemorrhage, and almost certainly introducing an infection that was far more lethal than Guiteau’s bullet.”

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Most Medical Devices … Approved for Pediatric Use Weren’t Tested on Kids First

A Reuters Health article noted “Children are not simply ‘small adults,’ and a device found to be safe and effective in adults may have a very different safety and effectiveness profile when used in a pediatric population…” “Without this data, it is difficult for clinicians and parents to make informed treatment decisions that weigh the risks and benefits of a particular treatment…,” The new study examined what kind of testing has been done on medical devices meant for kids since an act of Congress incentivized their development seven years ago.

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Eye Safety Tips Over Labor Day Weekend

In the U.S., more than 9,000 fireworks injuries happen each year, with roughly 1 in 8 fireworks injuries harming the eyes. With Labor Day weekend celebrations approaching, Dr. Ronald C. Gentile, Professor of Ophthalmology and the Chief of Ocular Trauma Service at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, wants to remind people of some eye health and fireworks safety tips.

“Common fireworks and sparkler eye injuries include burns, lacerations, abrasions, retinal detachment, optic nerve damage and ruptured eyeball,” says Dr. Gentile. “And children are frequent victims of these injuries. As many as 30 percent of eye traumas caused by fireworks impact kids.”

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“Nurse Practitioners Are Worthy Professionals … but They Are Not Doctors.”

The New York Times op-ed noted “EARLIER this month, the New York State Legislature passed a bill granting nurse practitioners the right to provide primary care without physician oversight. New York joins 16 other states and the District of Columbia in awarding such autonomy. (Most states still require nurse practitioners to work with physicians under a written practice agreement.) The bill’s authors contend that mandatory collaboration with a physician “no longer serves a clinical purpose” and reduces much-needed access to primary care.”

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Beware of Shifting Options within Medicare Plans

The New York Times reported: “The Medicare open enrollment season, which runs from Oct. 15 through Dec. 7, gives individuals a chance to rethink it all and reassess whether their plan still fits their needs.”

“Elizabeth Cooper, a 68-year-old former elementary schoolteacher, weighs her options each year. She has already tried a couple of plans, including one through Medicare Advantage, which lured her in because it had no monthly premium. But the plan required her to shoulder a significant share of her medical costs.”

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