A Leader in Ophthalmology Joins Mount Sinai

James C. Tsai, MD, MBA, a world-renowned physician-scientist with a research focus on glaucoma, has been named President of New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai (NYEE) and Chair of Ophthalmology of the Mount Sinai Health System. As President, Dr. Tsai says his main goals will be raising the visibility of NYEE to referring physicians, and ensuring that it is known as an international center of excellence in residency and fellowship training in ophthalmology and otolaryngology.

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Mount Sinai to Open Kidney Stone Center

A comprehensive outpatient Kidney Stone Center, which will offer patients new minimally invasive techniques and a holistic approach to prevention, will be the first of its kind in New York City when it opens this fall in two Manhattan locations.

The Center will be headed by Mantu Gupta, MD, who was recently named Director of Endourology and Stone Disease for the Mount Sinai Health System, Chair of Urology at Mount Sinai Roosevelt and Mount Sinai St. Luke’s, and Professor of Urology.

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Eye Safety Tips Over Labor Day Weekend

In the U.S., more than 9,000 fireworks injuries happen each year, with roughly 1 in 8 fireworks injuries harming the eyes. With Labor Day weekend celebrations approaching, Dr. Ronald C. Gentile, Professor of Ophthalmology and the Chief of Ocular Trauma Service at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, wants to remind people of some eye health and fireworks safety tips.

“Common fireworks and sparkler eye injuries include burns, lacerations, abrasions, retinal detachment, optic nerve damage and ruptured eyeball,” says Dr. Gentile. “And children are frequent victims of these injuries. As many as 30 percent of eye traumas caused by fireworks impact kids.”

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“…Many Decisions about Discussing Errors with Patients … Involve Situations in Which Other Clinicians Were Primarily Responsible for the Error.”

Have you ever wondered what your physician should say to you if a medical error by another physician is identified?

A recent New England Journal of Medicine article focused on this question.

“Although a consensus has been reached regarding the ethical duty to communicate openly with patients who have been harmed by medical errors physicians struggle to fulfill this responsibility …”

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“…Variation … is What Plagues Healthcare”

A recent article in Beckers Hospital Review focused on clinical care variation -

“Back when he was a resident, (he) saw two physicians perform separate colonoscopies, in which they discovered polyps in their respective patients. Each, however, went about removing the polyp in a different way — one via endoscopic surgery, another through open surgery. Despite having the resources and expertise to perform the procedure endoscopically, the physician who decided on surgery said his reason was a simple one: “That’s how I like to do it.”"

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“The Sudden Termination of a Close Doctor-Patient Relationship Is a Wrenching Scenario …”

A major source of emotional and spiritual suffering among patients who are nearing the end of life is the abandonment they feel when they stop being cared for by a physician to whom they have become attached.

A recent New York Times article noted “’I can tell you, it happens all the time and it breaks the heart of patients and families and oncologists,’ said Dr. Diane Meier, director of the Center to Advance Palliative Care at Mount Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine in New York City.”

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“How Healthcare Is Changing—for the Better”

There are many innovative practices being used to make sure patients are not unnecessarily readmitted to the hospital.

A recent U.S News article describes a discharge regimen used by the Cleveland Clinic.

“When Richard Jones of Niles, Ohio, 70, was discharged in May, he was sent home with a digital scale to flag any weight fluctuations (a possible sign of fluid buildup), a blood pressure cuff, and other monitoring equipment tied into the hospital system. He was also assigned a telemonitoring support team of nurses, social workers, nutritionists, therapists, and doctors who would check his vital signs daily, remotely or in person, for up to 40 days. In phone and house calls, the team coordinated follow-up doctor visits and counseled the lifelong cheeseburger-and-fries fan on worrisome symptoms to watch for and how to make lifestyle changes stick.”

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“… Comparing the Quality and Outcomes of Care at Competing Cancer Centers”

“Cancer!” Should you rush to a “major” cancer center?

A recent Modern Healthcare article noted “When it comes to cancer care, there is a huge disconnect between the possibilities of modern medicine and its day-to-day practice. As last fall’s troubling report from the Institute of Medicine noted, variation in oncology practice is wide; collection of quality and outcomes data is poor; and progress in learning what works best for any particular cancer remains slow and halting.”

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New Research Refutes Long-Held Antiviral Theory

A long-standing belief that mammals use the same potent antiviral molecules deployed by plants and invertebrates is being challenged by researchers at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Their findings, published in the July 10, 2014, issue of Cell Reports, surprised many scientists who assumed that antiviral RNA Interference (RNAi) exists in humans as a natural result of evolution.

Scientists know that human cells, like cells in every living organism with a nucleus, encode and generate small RNAs, which influence our genetics. It is also known that mammals combat viruses with interferons—proteins manufactured by immune cells in response to pathogens.

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