Breakfast of Legends

The Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center (MSAHC), a pioneer and leader in the treatment of adolescent-specific health services, will celebrate its 11th annual Breakfast of Legends benefit on Thursday, October 23, from 7:30 to 9 am, at The Plaza.

Funds raised at the Breakfast of Legends enable the MSAHC to provide free comprehensive health care—medical, mental, dental, optical, reproductive, and health education—to more than 11,000 adolescents from New York City and surrounding areas.

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Homemade, Health-Promoting Nut Milk (Recipe Included!)

Breast Cancer Awareness Month comes to us in October, a time when the cooling weather and change in seasonal produce lead us to reach for our favorite fall comfort foods. Spiced ciders, doughnuts, and pumpkin everything are a few of the season’s best indulgences, but as indulgences they should remain, or we’ll find ourselves entering the holidays with bloated stomachs and ill-fitting clothes.

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A Leader in Ophthalmology Joins Mount Sinai

James C. Tsai, MD, MBA, a world-renowned physician-scientist with a research focus on glaucoma, has been named President of New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai (NYEE) and Chair of Ophthalmology of the Mount Sinai Health System. As President, Dr. Tsai says his main goals will be raising the visibility of NYEE to referring physicians, and ensuring that it is known as an international center of excellence in residency and fellowship training in ophthalmology and otolaryngology.

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Mount Sinai to Open Kidney Stone Center

A comprehensive outpatient Kidney Stone Center, which will offer patients new minimally invasive techniques and a holistic approach to prevention, will be the first of its kind in New York City when it opens this fall in two Manhattan locations.

The Center will be headed by Mantu Gupta, MD, who was recently named Director of Endourology and Stone Disease for the Mount Sinai Health System, Chair of Urology at Mount Sinai Roosevelt and Mount Sinai St. Luke’s, and Professor of Urology.

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Eye Safety Tips Over Labor Day Weekend

In the U.S., more than 9,000 fireworks injuries happen each year, with roughly 1 in 8 fireworks injuries harming the eyes. With Labor Day weekend celebrations approaching, Dr. Ronald C. Gentile, Professor of Ophthalmology and the Chief of Ocular Trauma Service at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, wants to remind people of some eye health and fireworks safety tips.

“Common fireworks and sparkler eye injuries include burns, lacerations, abrasions, retinal detachment, optic nerve damage and ruptured eyeball,” says Dr. Gentile. “And children are frequent victims of these injuries. As many as 30 percent of eye traumas caused by fireworks impact kids.”

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“Medical Errors Are a Quiet and Largely Unseen Tragedy.”

“Every year between 210,000 and 440,000 Americans die as a result of medical errors and other preventable harm at hospitals, according to researchers.”

These numbers are equivalent to a jumbo jet crashing every day with no survivors. Based on these figures, medical errors could be considered the third-leading cause of death in America, behind heart disease (more than 590,000 a year) and cancer (more than 570,000 a year).

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“Doctors Overlook Lucrative Procedures When Naming Unwise Treatments”

It is always a good idea to talk to your primary care practitioner, the clinician who knows you best, about procedures suggested consulting physicians.

A Kaiser Health News article noted: “The medical profession has historically been reluctant to condemn unwarranted but often lucrative tests and treatments that can rack up costs to patients but not improve their health and can sometimes hurt them. But in 2012, medical specialty societies began publishing lists of at least five services that both doctors and patients should consider skeptically. So far, 54 specialty societies have each offered recommendations and distributed them to more than a half-million doctors.”

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“More than 5% … of U.S. Adults, Could Be Misdiagnosed during an Outpatient Visit …, and about One-Half of These Errors Had the Potential to Lead to Worse Outcomes for the Patients.”

A Modern Healthcare article reported on a studies which defined misdiagnoses as “missed opportunities to make a timely or correct diagnosis based on the available evidence.”

“One of the studies used in the analysis, published in March 2013 in JAMA Internal Medicine, identified nearly 70 different conditions for which misdiagnoses occurred in the primary-care setting, like pneumonia, renal failure and urinary tract infections. The other two focused specifically on cancer, including a retrospective study published in BMJ that used electronic health-record data to detect potential delays in prostate and colon cancer diagnoses; and a 2010 study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, which evaluated whether EHRs could be good predictors of misdiagnoses in lung cancer.”

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