Coughing into your elbow is a good idea … But for God’s sake, wash your hands

Everyone is still coughing into their elbow crook, but is it evidence-based? A recent article in DETAILS explained:

“Researchers have seen that a fair number of respiratory particles still escape into the surrounding air, even when an barrier like a tissue, sleeve, hand, or surgical mask is placed in front of the cougher’s mouth, … Plus, the droplets that sneak past cough-blocking barriers are the tiniest ones, which are light enough to hang around in the air for hours and small enough to penetrate your cube mate’s respiratory tract.”

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“…You can prevent a medical error by simply asking the right questions”

A recent ivillage.com article offered some advice on what to do and not do to when getting started with a physician.

“The doctor should ask thorough questions but the patient needs to be honest and not withhold information, even if it’s embarrassing or hard to talk about. Know your – and your family’s – medical history and bring in any medications you are taking, even if you think they are unrelated. If the doctor doesn’t have all the information, the likelihood of a misdiagnosis increases.

Don’t be shy: Whether it’s voicing concerns or mentioning tests you’ve read about or asking about drug interactions, patients need to speak up. It’s ok to do your own homework, just don’t get too caught up in self-diagnosing online before your appointment …”

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What to Know about Childhood and Teen Obesity

We commonly hear that two-thirds of all adults in the U.S. are overweight or obese, and that adult obesity has risen at an alarming rate over the past 30 years. What is less commonly heard is that the rate of obesity has risen nearly three times faster in adolescents as compared to adults in the past 30 years! Importantly, 70 percent of obese teens become obese adults, and adult obesity has been linked to other serious diseases including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and several forms of cancer. Thus, the teen years represent a particularly crucial time to reach kids and help them build healthier habits that they can continue into adulthood.

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“Music is Medicine” Visits the Mount Sinai Kravis Children’s Hospital

Music is Medicine is a nonprofit run by a team of college students that pairs artists with pediatric patients through uplifting music programs. Through Music is Medicine’s Donate a Song project, artists write and record original songs for seriously-ill children to inspire the patients, share their stories of strength, and contribute to the greater fight against their diseases.

This past summer, Cindy, a 16 year-old girl battling cancer at the Mount Sinai Kravis Children’s Hospital, met artists Sam Tsui and Elle Winter. The artists then went on to produce an original song called “Unsinkable” for Cindy. In the chorus Sam and Elle sing, “My heart’s unsinkable. Never doubt that things will get better. Can you feel the love? I’m never giving up.” Through the song, Sam and Elle motivate Cindy and people everywhere to never give up. At the same time, all proceeds for the song will benefit pediatric oncology research at Mount Sinai.

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Mount Sinai Saved My Life

My name is Loren Ridinger and I was diagnosed with and underwent brain surgery for a brain aneurysm, all within a couple months. I am so grateful to Mount Sinai and Dr. Aman Patel for saving my life; over 30,000 people die each year from ruptured aneurysms and I could have been one of them if it wasn’t for this hospital and its amazing doctors.

Don’t settle for less than the best when it comes to your health. You have to be your biggest advocate – there is nothing more important! Be persistent! I had learned to live with vertigo for years because every doctor I went to said there was “nothing wrong” with me. Remember that they are practitioners, not perfect, and only you know what’s happening to your body. After demanding an MRI and then an MRA (similar to an MRI except it focuses on your arteries) and learning that I had an 8.5 mm aneurysm of my internal carotid artery behind my left eye, I went from doctor to doctor and different hospitals trying to figure out what came next.

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