Mount Sinai Doctors Among the Best in New York

The Mount Sinai Health System was highly represented in New York magazine’s recently released list of “Best Doctors in New York,” which named 227 physicians from all seven hospitals and 36 doctors from Mount Sinai’s affiliated hospitals. The 263 physicians represented 21 percent of the total 1,251 doctors on New York magazine’s 2014 list, which appeared online and in the June 9-15, 2014 print edition. The list covers physicians from throughout the New York metropolitan region, including Connecticut and New Jersey.

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Tell your doctor about your travel history

A recent Modern Health Care article noted “The key is getting that travel history right up front when you’re interviewing the patient and then as soon as you suspect MERS—even before you do the testing—you should make sure you have that patient on isolation precautions so they don’t spread to any other patients or healthcare workers.”

“The major lesson from this first MERs experience in the U.S. for other healthcare providers is “to think about MERS you really need to get a good travel history..,”.

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Often “primary care doctors’ appointments to be scheduled at 15-minute intervals”

“Some physicians who work for hospitals say they’ve been asked to see patients every 11 minutes.”

A recent Kaiser Health News article noted “ Patients – and physicians – say they feel the time crunch as never before as doctors rush through appointments as if on roller skates to see more patients and perform more procedures to make up for flat or declining reimbursements.” “

“Doctors have one eye on the patient and one eye on the clock….”

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Be prepared with the questions you want to ask your doctor & make sure you understand the answers before you leave

The federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality has published lists of questions you should consider before, during and after an appointment with your doctor.

“You can make sure you get the best possible care by being an active member of your health care team. Being involved means being prepared and asking questions. Asking questions about your diagnoses, treatments, and medicines can improve the quality, safety, and effectiveness of your health care. Taking steps before your medical appointments will help you to make the most of your time with your doctor and health care team.”

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Are Sure You Know What Kind of “Doctor” is Treating You?

If you are not certain who is treating you, ask!!!

We are familiar with M.D. and D.O. (physicians). Many other clinicians are called doctor such as your dentist (D.M.D.), podiatrist (D.P.M.), optometrist (O.D.) and chiropractor (D.C.).

Read this from the New York Times:

“Hi. I’m Dr. Patti McCarver, and I’m your nurse,” she said. And with that, Dr. McCarver stuck a scope in Ms. Cassidy’s ear, noticed a buildup of fluid and prescribed an allergy medicine. It was something that will become increasingly routine for patients: a someone who is not a physician using the title of doctor. Dr. McCarver calls herself a doctor because she returned to school to earn a doctorate last year, one of thousands of nurses doing the same recently. Doctorates are popping up all over the health professions, and the result is a quiet battle over not only the title “doctor,” but also the money, power and prestige that often come with it.”

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Don’t Behave Emotionally When Asking for Hand-Washing Compliance

Recently a Fox Business story noted: “When Cari Shane requested that her four-year-old’s pediatrician wash her hands before starting the exam, the doctor complied, but was upset. But Shane, who is a public relations executive, says if she were in the same position, she’d do the same thing all over again. “What was more important? Having the doctor mad at me or protecting the health of my child?”

“Strict hand hygiene is the gold standard for reducing infections associated with health care-associated infections (HAIs), experts say. And when doctors, nurses and health care workers fall short, it’s important for patients to feel confident enough to speak up.”

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Does Your Physician Use an Electronic Medical Record (EMR)?

There are many advantages of electronic medical records. Electronic medical records (EMR) help health care providers better manage patient care by:

  • Getting accurate and complete information about their patient’s health
  • Better coordinating the care they give to their patients and families
  • Securely sharing information with patients electronically about their personal health record
  • Accessing information to help diagnose patients, reducing medical errors, and providing safer care at lower costs
  • An EMR contains patient health information, such as: Administrative and billing data; Patient demographics; Progress notes; Vital signs; Medical histories ; Diagnoses; Medications; Immunization dates; Allergies; Radiology images; Lab and test results

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