Physical Fitness in Late Adolescence May Reduce The Risk of Developing Adult-Onset Diabetes

Casey Crump, MD, PhD

Casey Crump, MD, PhD

Physical fitness in late adolescence may reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life, according to a new study from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai that appeared online in the March 8, 2016, issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Researchers—led by Casey Crump, MD, PhD, Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai—evaluated data on the aerobic capacity of 1.5 million males who were military conscripts in Sweden between 1969 and 1997. The scientists then compared the men’s aerobic capacity to their medical diagnoses that were made between 1987 and 2012, when the men were a maximum age of 62. Read more

New Technology That Serves as an Artificial Pancreas Is Revolutionizing the Management of Type 1 Diabetes

New Technology That Serves as an Artificial Pancreas Is Revolutionizing the Management of Type 1 Diabetes

The AP (Artificial Pancreas) system runs an algorithm on a smartphone that communicates with an insulin pump and an implanted glucose sensor.

Research under way at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is revolutionizing the management of type 1 diabetes by using novel technology that serves as an artificial pancreas and automatically enables patients to achieve more stable glucose levels 24 hours a day.

Led by Carol Levy, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Disease), the Icahn School of Medicine is one of nine U.S. and European sites participating in the research, and sharing a $12.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Levy is one of the study’s lead investigators. Read more

New Diabetes Center of Excellence Opens

New Diabetes Center of Excellence Opens

From left to right: Arthur Gianelli, President, Mount Sinai St. Luke’s; Jeanine Albu, MD; and Dennis S. Charney, MD

A reception celebrating the opening of the Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Diabetes Center of Excellence, located at 1111 Amsterdam Avenue, was held on Thursday, January 21. The new facility includes spacious outpatient clinical areas, a dedicated space for a weight loss program, and proximity to the headquarters, clinical research unit, and laboratories of the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Disease at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West. The Center will serve a diverse population of patients on Manhattan’s Upper West Side and in Harlem. Read more

Use of Big Data Leads to Discovery in Diabetes

Joel Dudley, PhDAfter carefully analyzing the electronic health records (EHRs) of 11,000 patients, investigators at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have discovered three potential new subtypes of type 2 diabetes.

The discovery, led by Joel Dudley, PhD, Director of Biomedical Informatics at the Icahn School of Medicine, highlights the power of new technology and the promise of precision medicine, as the Mount Sinai Health System ushers in the use of Big Data in discovering, treating, and preventing disease. The results of the study were published in Science Translational Medicine in October, 2015. Read more

A Promising New Treatment for Sleep Apnea

Fred Lin, MD

Fred Lin, MD, Chief of the Division of Sleep Surgery at the Mount Sinai Health System, left, and Boris Chernobilsky, MD, Director of the Division of Sleep Surgery at Mount Sinai Beth Israel, are pioneering new surgery for sleep apnea.

Physicians at the Mount Sinai Health System are among the first in New York State to offer a promising new surgical treatment for people with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea, a common disorder characterized by the recurrent narrowing and closing of a person’s upper airway during sleep. Moderate-to-severe sleep apnea—defined as 15 or more episodes of disturbed airflow per hour—is often associated with excessive daytime sleepiness and an increased risk for diabetes and heart disease. Read more

Mount Sinai Researchers Identifies Drug with Potential to Drive Beta Cell Proliferation

Andrew Stewart, MDIn a screen of more than 100,000 potential drugs, only one, harmine, drove human insulin-producing beta cells to multiply, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, published in Nature Medicine.

Diabetes results from too few insulin-producing “beta cells” in the pancreas secreting too little insulin, the hormone required to keep blood sugar levels in the normal range. In a groundbreaking Mount Sinai study, researchers found that harmine drove the sustained division and multiplication of adult human beta cells in culture, a feat that had eluded the field for years. In addition, harmine treatment tripled the number of beta cells and led to better control of blood sugar in three groups of mice engineered to mimic human diabetes. Read more

Mount Sinai Researchers Make Diabetes Discoveries

Andrew Stewart, MD, the Irene and Dr. Arthur M. Fishberg Professor of Medicine and Director of Mount Sinai’s Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism Institute led a team of scientists who discovered a novel mechanism that regulates the replication of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Their findings provided novel working models describing the control of cell cycle progression in the human beta cell. These discoveries offer new insights into possible therapeutic approaches to stimulate the regeneration of pancreatic beta cells in patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Read more

Leadership and Staff Celebrate National Walking Day

Hundreds of Mount Sinai Health System employees laced up their sneakers and participated in several 30-minute, lunchtime walks in their hospital campus communities on Wednesday, April 1, for National Walking Day, to raise awareness of the health benefits of walking for cardiovascular health. Beth Oliver, DNP, RN, Vice President of Cardiac Services for the Mount Sinai Health System, set the tone for the day, saying, “Mount Sinai is committed to teaming up to get active and make strides against cardiovascular diseases. A simple 30-minute brisk walk each day can significantly impact and improve heart health and longevity.” Walking, she says, can help individuals lower risk of heart attacks and strokes, maintain normal blood pressure, reduce cholesterol, and prevent diabetes and obesity.

A Healthy Start With Help From The Diabetes Alliance

Elizabeth Peralta, a Laboratory Technician at The Mount Sinai Hospital, lost 55 pounds in five months and reversed her diagnosis of type 2 diabetes with help from The Diabetes Alliance at the Mount Sinai Health System. The Diabetes Alliance offers Mount Sinai staff and patients personalized diabetes education, nutrition, and counseling and support to achieve their health and wellness goals.

The quick turnaround for Ms. Peralta started in July, after a routine physical with her internist, Laurie Edelman, MD, revealed that her blood sugar level had significantly increased over the prior year, resulting in a diagnosis of uncontrolled type 2 diabetes. Dr. Edelman is an Associate Professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Read more