“…Medical Trials —Often Fail to Include Older Participants.”

A Boston Globe article noted for older patients the “cardiologist must develop a treatment plan despite little published evidence to guide his clinical decisions.”

“There are almost no data to guide cardiovascular disease management for people who are over 80 and relatively poor data for people over 70… ‘You have smart and caring doctors trying to practice evidence-based medicine, but there is little evidence.’”

“While doctors and policymakers have long recognized that translating drugs from adults to children might not be as easy as halving the dose, and that the toxicities that are common in men might be different than in women, researchers say that the same understanding lags when it comes to older adults.”

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Cancer Clinical Trials Video Now Online

Today’s standard therapies for cancer exist because people have participated in clinical trials – yet choosing to participate in a cancer clinical trial is an important personal decision that can be intimidating for many patients. In order to better help patients understand cancer clinical trials, the reasons to participate in them, and clinical research at Mount Sinai, The Tisch Cancer Institute has released a new video, “Clinical Trials at Mount Sinai: Moving the Field Forward.”

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Personalized Medicine: Will DNA Sequencing Improve Your Cancer Treatment?

Personalized Medicine is a rapidly evolving approach to patient care that incorporates an individual’s genetic information into a customized prevention or treatment plan.  Mapping a person’s total genetic makeup or whole genome sequencing has created mountains of data about variations in our human genetic code.  As this experience has grown, some of these variations have been linked to risks for certain diseases, or in some cases the likelihood that a person will respond to a particular treatment.  Individuals may now submit a DNA sample and obtain their genetic sequence with accompanying risk association analysis for a few hundred dollars.  Can this technology however be harnessed to drive better outcomes for patients diagnosed with cancer?  Many clinicians and scientists argue that we are not there yet.

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