Garth Brooks Makes a Special Visit

Kravis Children’s Hospital at Mount Sinai, Garth Brooks and Band Visit to The Zone.  Photo © Robert Caplin

Kravis Children’s Hospital at Mount Sinai, Garth Brooks and Band Visit to The Zone.

The country and pop music star Garth Brooks and his band members paid a special visit in July to the Child Life Zone at the Kravis Children’s Hospital at Mount Sinai to talk with pediatric patients and their families, play games, create artwork, and take photos. “The Zone,” which provides a fun and friendly environment for therapeutic and educational play activities, opened 10 years ago in partnership with the Garth Brooks Teammates for Kids Foundation and The Troy Aikman Foundation. Mr. Brooks and his band also appeared on a KidZone TV live broadcast, sharing stories and answering questions from pediatric patients in their hospital rooms. “The pure joy, energy, spirit, and warmth that Garth and the band brought to our children, teens, families, and staff was unparalleled,” says Diane Rode, Director, Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department, Kravis Children’s Hospital. “We are grateful every day for the power of ‘The Zone’ in helping us to humanize health care for our seriously ill children and their families.”

Mount Sinai Expands Neurosurgery Care to Brooklyn

Blyn_Neuro_040.jpgNeurosurgery patients at Mount Sinai Brooklyn can now receive in-depth evaluations, and local treatment in many cases, without having to travel into Manhattan. Ronit Gilad, MD, Chief of the Neurosurgical service at Mount Sinai Brooklyn, and Soriaya Motivala, MD, Co-Chief of the service, are leading the effort. Both are Assistant Professors of Neurosurgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and former Mount Sinai Neurosurgery residents. Read more

Promoting Heart Health for Staff

World_Yoga-IMG_5288-RTFor the third consecutive year, Annapoorna S. Kini, MD, Director of the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory at The Mount Sinai Hospital, invited Mount Sinai Heart staff and their families to join her for a 5K run. More than 80 employees and their families participated in the event that took place on Saturday, May 21, in Central Park. “It is very important to practice what we preach,” says Dr. Kini (shown in photo at right, front row, center). “We tell our patients to exercise in order to be heart healthy. As staff, we need to serve as examples for our patients and make sure that we are heart healthy ourselves.” Dr. Kini, who is also Professor of Medicine (Cardiology), additionally encouraged staff from throughout the Hospital to participate in International Yoga Day on Tuesday, June 21 (left photo), a full-day event that attracted more than 100 individuals and featured meditation, yoga, and talks on nutrition.

Celebrating Cancer Survivors

From left: Kelli Schnurman, LCSW, Social Work Program Coordinator, Mount Sinai Health System; Amy Porter-Tacoronte, MBA; Jan Christensen; Herschey McGhee; Alison Snow, PhD, Social Work Supervisor, and Jeremy Winell, MD, Director, Cancer Supportive Services, Mount Sinai Beth Israel Comprehensive Cancer Center West; Daniel M. Labow, MD; and Karen Lee, MSN, FNP-BC.

From left: Kelli Schnurman, LCSW, Social Work Program Coordinator, Mount Sinai Health System; Amy Porter-Tacoronte, MBA; Jan Christensen; Herschey McGhee; Alison Snow, PhD, Social Work Supervisor, and Jeremy Winell, MD, Director, Cancer Supportive Services, Mount Sinai Beth Israel Comprehensive Cancer Center West; Daniel M. Labow, MD; and Karen Lee, MSN, FNP-BC.

Jan Christensen, a singer/songwriter and lymphoma survivor who was treated at Mount Sinai Beth Israel, entertained 200 guests at Mount Sinai’s 19th annual National Cancer Survivors Day® luncheon on Sunday, June 5, at Phillips Ambulatory Care Center. Among the attendees were cancer survivors, their families and friends, and Mount Sinai faculty and staff. Amy Porter-Tacoronte, MBA, Vice President of Oncology Services, Mount Sinai Health System, delivered the keynote address. Speakers included Herschey McGhee, a breast cancer survivor who was treated at Mount Sinai West; Daniel M. Labow, MD, Associate Professor, Surgery, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Chief, Division of Surgical Oncology, The Mount Sinai Hospital; and Karen Lee, MSN, FNP-BC, Nurse Practitioner, Thoracic Oncology Program, Mount Sinai Beth Israel Comprehensive Cancer Center West.

Detecting and Tracking Repetitive Traumatic Brain Injury in Patients With a History of Concussions

Tau T807_panel-CMYKResearchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai are pioneering the use of a new imaging agent used with positron emission tomography (PET) to detect and track the progression of repetitive traumatic brain injury in patients with a history of concussions.

The ability to actually see chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in living patients is particularly significant because the neurodegenerative disorder—associated with repetitive traumatic brain injury in athletes and soldiers—can only be definitively diagnosed in brain tissue after they are deceased. Read more

Recognizing Outstanding Staff at Mount Sinai Beth Israel

Front row, from left: Althea Reid, Patient Care Associate; Yazmin Navarro, Manager; Terry Altilio, LCSW, Social Work Coordinator; Hinde Nessanbaum, CI, Coordinator; and Milord Baptiste, Lead X-ray Technician. Back row, from left: Cheryl Gilmore-Hall, RN; Carzei O’Neill, CASAC, Counselor; Teisha Horton-Jordan, RN; Susan Somerville, RN; Jinquan Ye, CST, Surgical Technician; and Lakiyah Glivens, Registrar I.

Front row, from left: Althea Reid, Patient Care Associate; Yazmin Navarro, Manager; Terry Altilio, LCSW, Social Work Coordinator; Hinde Nessanbaum, CI, Coordinator; and Milord Baptiste, Lead X-ray Technician. Back row, from left: Cheryl Gilmore-Hall, RN; Carzei O’Neill, CASAC, Counselor; Teisha Horton-Jordan, RN; Susan Somerville, RN; Jinquan Ye, CST, Surgical Technician; and Lakiyah Glivens, Registrar I.

Ten Mount Sinai Beth Israel employees received a 2016 Heart Award, one of the hospital’s most prestigious honors, at a lunch reception on Friday, February 26, held at Podell Auditorium. The award recognizes employees—nominated and selected by their peers—who continuously focus on patient safety, enhancing the patient experience, and making Mount Sinai Beth Israel the hospital of choice for patients, staff, and the community. Mount Sinai Beth Israel President Susan Somerville, RN, congratulated the 2016 awardees at the reception.

Mount Sinai Receives Comprehensive Stroke Center Certification

Mount Sinai has become the first medical center in New York State to receive advanced certification as a Comprehensive Stroke Center and joins an elite group of institutions around the nation that meets The Joint Commission’s standards and requirements for complex stroke care. The announcement was made after The Joint Commission reviewed Mount Sinai’s stroke-care programs in June.

“By achieving this advanced certification, Mount Sinai has thoroughly demonstrated the greatest level of commitment to the care of its patients with a complex stroke condition,” said Mark R. Chassin, MD, FACP, MPP, MPH, President, The Joint Commission. “Certification is a voluntary process and The Joint Commission commends Mount Sinai for successfully undertaking this challenge to elevate the standard of its care for the community it serves.”

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The Department of Spiritual Care and Education

Imam Souleimane Konate entered, his robes billowing out behind him.  He sat down and joined the others, some regulars and a few new to the group.  It was the morning of the monthly community religious leaders involvement breakfast.  Rabbi Rafael Goldstein, Director of the Department of Spiritual Care and Education introduced himself and we went around the table giving our names and congregations.  The Imam then gave the opening blessing, in both Arabic and English.

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Reforming Medical Education

Pre-med education is fundamentally flawed. This is something that the Medical Education community has known and written about for decades but has never acted upon. There are three critical problems:

  • Pre-med science requirements were established almost 100 years ago and have not changed since then despite extraordinary advances in clinical medicine and biomedical science.
  • These requirements consume an enormous amount of time and energy, detracting severely from what should be an enriching, stimulating college education.
  • The Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) is an expensive (between the tests fees and pre courses), time-consuming hurdle that perpetuates the need to focus on memorization of facts and competition for grades.

More than 100 years ago, Abraham Flexner reformed medical education throughout the nation. He was considered visionary and is responsible for establishing what we currently consider to be the gold standard for how medicine is taught, both in medical school and in preparing for medical school. Since then, medicine and science have changed more rapidly than any other field, with the possible exception of information technology. Yet educators at both the college and medical school levels have failed to refresh his vision and align the physician training with society’s needs. We’ve also perpetuated the notion that everyone has to be taught the same requirements in lockstep, with little room for flexible, individualized, and self-directed learning.

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