Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer

Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous and rapidly progressive disease of low prevalence and poor survival. In the United States the number of deaths attributed to ovarian cancer approximates that of all other gynecologic malignancies combined.  Unfortunately, the majority (75%) of women diagnosed with ovarian carcinoma continue to have advanced stage disease (Stage III/ IV), with widespread metastases throughout the peritoneal cavity, lymph nodes, liver or lungs. Presently less than 20% of women with ovarian cancers are detected when the cancer is still confined to the ovary (Stage I).

Read more

Mount Sinai Neurosurgeon Uses New Device to Treat Brain Tumors

Glioblastoma (GBM)  is the most common and most aggressive brain tumor, known to be a highly invasive and rapidly spreading disease. Even with aggressive treatment such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, they are almost always incurable.

The Mount Sinai Comprehensive Brain Tumor Program is pioneering the use of electrical tumor treating fields to be used with conventional therapy. The device, manufactured by Novocure, is called NovoTTF and it is FDA approved for recurrent GBM. It consists of a head cap that produces changes in electrical fields, which is worn continuously.

Read more

Cancer Clinical Trials Video Now Online

Today’s standard therapies for cancer exist because people have participated in clinical trials – yet choosing to participate in a cancer clinical trial is an important personal decision that can be intimidating for many patients. In order to better help patients understand cancer clinical trials, the reasons to participate in them, and clinical research at Mount Sinai, The Tisch Cancer Institute has released a new video, “Clinical Trials at Mount Sinai: Moving the Field Forward.”

Read more

GUT-BRAIN connection: Exploring the role of Microbiome in Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the Central Nervous System of debated etiology. While there is general consensus regarding the role of an active immune system in myelin destruction, the questions related to the initial events triggering immune system involvement remain unanswered and the identity of disease course modifiers is only partially understood. Epidemiological studies have suggested the possibility that disease onset and course are the result of an interaction between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors, though much remains to be learned about the identity of the environmental factors and whether they can be modified.  Among the proposed variables affecting MS are geographic location, smoking, vitamin D levels and the much debated diet and infections.

Read more

A Great Opportunity to Study and Treat a Potentially Devastating Illness

Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the single most common reason for regulatory actions concerning drugs, including failure to gain approval for marketing, removal from the market place and restriction of prescribing indications.

DILI is also a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in many patient populations. Due to its idiosyncratic nature, variable presentation and the vast number of potential causative drugs as well as herbal and dietary supplements, DILI is often diagnosed late in its course when patients have severe liver disease. DILI, including acute liver failure requiring liver transplantation, can happen anytime to anyone taking medications, even over the counter medications. Unfortunately, there are no tests to predict who is at risk nor to diagnose this problem. Read more

Mount Sinai Participates in the Aspen Ideas Festival

Significant advances in science are taking place, but translating them into clinical treatments for an array of human diseases is being hampered by public policies that are not aligned with the public good. That observation was articulated by Kenneth L. Davis, MD, President and Chief Executive Officer of The Mount Sinai Medical Center, during a discussion on “What’s Holding Back Medical Progress?,” one of three talks in which he participated at the ninth annual Aspen Ideas Festival, in Colorado, which ran from June 26 – July 2.

Read more

Introducing the Neuroscience Training Program

Mount Sinai’s Neuroscience Training Program offers predoctoral students an exciting and distinctive curriculum taught by a nationally and internationally recognized faculty, and a laboratory experience that builds on groundbreaking, cutting edge expertise in basic and translational neuroscience across a wide range of psychiatric and neurological disorders. A student’s training experience uniquely interfaces basic research within a clinical context by virtue of the close apposition of basic and clinical research and clinical treatment programs at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the Mount Sinai Hospital. Indeed, all graduate students take a class in clinical neuroscience where they meet patients with brain diseases.

Read more

A New Era for Biomedical Education, Research

Mount Sinai’s leadership in biomedical research and patient care, together with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s expertise in engineering and invention prototyping, form the foundation for a new academic affiliation agreement between the two institutions. The agreement signals a new era of biomedical discovery and entrepreneurship for the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Rensselaer.

The partnership, commemorated at a signing ceremony on Wednesday, May 22, promotes collaboration in educational programs and research, with the ultimate goal of developing innovative diagnostic tools and treatments for patients around the world.

Read more

Champions of Children’s Health

More than 700 attendees showed their support for children’s environmental health at The Mount Sinai Medical Center’s sixth annual Greening Our Children luncheon, held on Monday, May 20, at the Hyatt Regency Greenwich in Connecticut.

Proceeds from the event—which featured a guest appearance from actress and author Jessica Alba—will be used to support Mount Sinai’s Children’s Environmental Health Center (CEHC) and the Laboratory for Molecular Environmental Chemistry at Mount Sinai. The CEHC and laboratory are led by Philip J. Landrigan, MD, MSc, Dean for Global Health, the Ethel H. Wise Professor of Community Medicine, and Professor of Pediatrics; and Robert O. Wright, MD, Professor of Preventive Medicine, and Pediatrics, at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Read more

A Transformational Gift for Children’s Health

Eric M. Mindich, a member of Mount Sinai’s Boards of Trustees, and his wife, Stacey Mindich, have provided a leadership gift to advance groundbreaking science to improve children’s health. In recognition of their generosity, Mount Sinai’s Child Health and Development Institute recently was renamed The Mindich Child Health and Development Institute (MCHDI).

“Eric and Stacey’s extraordinarily generous gift represents a critical step toward Mount Sinai’s goal of transforming children’s health,” says Kenneth L. Davis, MD, President and Chief Executive Officer of The Mount Sinai Medical Center.

Read more