Uncovering a Stronger Link Between Obesity and Genes

Researchers from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, participating in the largest genetic study yet on obesity, have helped uncover stronger links between genes and body weight and body fat distribution.

The trailblazing discoveries were published in two companion papers in the February issue of the journal Nature, and were the result of a four-year international research project conducted by the Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium. Other key participating institutions included the Broad Institute of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, the University of Michigan Health System, and the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. Read more

Restorative Surgery That Patients Can Smile About

Joshua D. Rosenberg, MD, Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, is one of only a handful of U.S. surgeons who is using an innovative new procedure to restore the ability to smile in patients with facial paralysis.

The procedure, called cranial nerve V and VII transfer, helps to ameliorate the disfiguring effects of severe Bell’s palsy and, to a lesser extent, certain head and neck cancers. It calls for the surgeon to reroute the patient’s robust masseter nerve—which activates the chewing muscles—in order to power the paralyzed facial nerves and restore facial muscle function, specifically the muscles involved in smiling. Read more

A New Era for Bone Marrow Transplantation

Seminal research led by James Ferrara, MD, DSc, Ward-Coleman Chair in Cancer Medicine, has produced a promising approach to treating patients with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)—a sometimes fatal complication of bone marrow transplantation in which the donor’s immune cells attack the recipient’s body. Bone marrow transplants are often used to treat patients with leukemia, lymphoma, and other blood diseases. Read more

Attention Statin Patients: Are You Experiencing Muscle Aches, Weakness, Decreased Exercise Capacity, “Brain Fog”, Impaired Clarity, or Memory Loss?

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you may have statin intolerance.

What are statins?

Statins are a class of cholesterol lowering medication therapies that have been extensively evaluated in controlled clinical trial studies. These medications have been consistently shown to reduce the risk of a first cardiovascular event including heart attack, stroke, and death from heart disease. Also, the drugs can reduce recurrent (two or more) cardiovascular events in people with a prior heart attack, or other acute coronary syndromes that result from a reduction in blood flow to the heart muscle, or stroke. In addition, studies show statins have helped reduce the total amount of deaths worldwide overall from cardiovascular diseases. Read more