Mount Sinai Health System Names Three Chief Medical Officers

The Mount Sinai Health System has appointed three new chief medical officers to lead The Mount Sinai Hospital, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, and Mount Sinai Queens.

Vicki LoPachin, MD, a respected member of the medical community who completed her residency and chief residency in internal medicine at Mount Sinai, recently returned to The Mount Sinai Hospital to serve as Chief Medical Officer.

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A New Affiliation with The New York Academy of Medicine

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and The New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM) announced the formation of a new partnership to jointly study and address a number of significant health issues and policies that impact the lives of people who live in urban areas. NYAM is an historic and independent institution that has been advancing the health of people living in cities since its founding in 1847.

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Mount Sinai Scientists Appear on CBS This Morning

In February, CBS This Morning had a segment on Mount Sinai’s novel use of fruit flies to screen for personalized cancer drugs. Ross Cagan, PhD, Associate Dean of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, discussed how his laboratory replicates a patient’s tumor and implants it in a fruit fly. Then his team tests an arsenal of 840 drugs—all approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for other uses—to see if they shrink the tumor.

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New Findings from Mount Sinai’s Seaver Autism Center

The most recent study from the Seaver Autism Center at Mount Sinai draws a possible link between the genetic abnormalities attributed to autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and dysregulation of the mechanism by which unused neural connections are pruned during development. This information builds upon prior discoveries at the Seaver Center, which identified three kinds of genetic mutations that are believed to contribute to autism risk: de novo mutations; recessive or X-linked mutations; and small chromosomal abnormalities.

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Studying the Effect of Vitamin E on Functional Decline in Alzheimer’s Disease

Functional decline, measured as the loss of ability to accomplish activities of daily living, such as bathing and dressing, planning or cooking a meal, and paying bills, is the major symptom in individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and the primary source of caregiver burden. Yet, few studies have focused on ways to slow this functional decline.

In a recently published study in The Journal of the American Medical Association, researchers, co-led by an investigator from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, reported that vitamin E, also known as alpha tocopherol, reduced functional decline in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s disease.

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