Advances in Heart Failure Research and Clinical Care

Mount Sinai scientists and clinicians are making notable advances in the study and treatment of heart failure, a common condition that occurs when the heart becomes too weak to pump and circulate enough blood through the body. Diseases that damage the heart—such as coronary artery disease, high blood pressure, and diabetes—can lead to heart failure, which develops over time as the heart’s pumping action grows weaker. It impacts an estimated 5 million adults and children in this country. Read more

“Home Away from Home” at the Transplant Living Center

The Mount Sinai Transplant Living Center, which provides convenient and affordable overnight accommodations to patients and their families receiving care at the Recanati/Miller Transplantation Institute (RMTI), has undergone a full renovation, featuring new kitchens, bathrooms, and furniture.

The renovation was a generous gift from benefactors Ken and Meryl Sherman who were looking to give back to RMTI on the fourteenth anniversary of Mrs. Sherman’s successful kidney transplant, for which Mr. Sherman was the donor. Read more

Noted Surgeon, Writer Delivers Lecture on “Being Mortal”

Before a capacity audience in Stern Auditorium that included faculty, staff, students, and the public, Atul Gawande, MD, MPH, noted surgeon, writer, and public health researcher, recently presented a professional overview—yet highly personalized account—of modern medicine’s impact on how we age, and die, in the twenty-first century. His speech, titled “Being Mortal,” based on his book, Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End, was delivered as the 2015 Annual Douglas West Memorial Lecture, an event sponsored by Mount Sinai’s Lilian and Benjamin Hertzberg Palliative Care Institute. Read more

Around the Health System

Mount Sinai Queens Community Health Fair Draws 900 Attendees

Mount Sinai Queens and the United Community Civic Association co-hosted a daylong neighborhood health fair at Kaufman Astoria Studios on Saturday, June 6, attracting some 900 attendees. Mount Sinai Queens staff offered a wide range of free health screenings, including glucose, cholesterol, blood pressure, asthma, and osteoporosis. They also measured body mass index and provided information on weight control, stress management, and smoking cessation and prevention. Attendees enjoyed free, healthy snacks from the hospital chef, family fun activities, and entertainment. Read more

Exploring Diverse Microbes Among Remote Amerindians

A population of Amerindian hunter-gatherers, who until recently had lived in isolation in the remote Venezuelan Amazon, is yielding a trove of information for scientists at Mount Sinai who are studying their microbiome and finding the most diverse levels of bacteria and bacteria-encoded functions ever discovered in humans. The human microbiome—comprised of trillions of microorganisms that inhabit our bodies—is believed to play a critical role in the well-being of the host. Read more

Kravis Children’s Hospital Achieves Major Gains in National Rankings

Kravis Children’s Hospital at Mount Sinai is again ranked among the nation’s top pediatric centers in seven of the ten specialties measured by U.S. News & World Report in its 2015-16 “Best Children’s Hospitals” guidebook. Notably, for the first time, Kravis Children’s Hospital achieved Top 20 rankings—and did so in two areas, pulmonology and nephrology—and is again ranked for cancer. Other specialties also made significant gains this year. Read more

East Side Endoscopy Helps the Underserved

East Side Endoscopy, LLC, an affiliate of Mount Sinai Beth Israel, provided 253 free colonoscopies to underserved patients in New York City last year, through its special charity program that was established in 2012 in partnership with the American Cancer Society and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The East Side Endoscopy Charity Program serves patients with no insurance and limited access to health care who otherwise would not seek screening services. Read more

Focusing on “Women in Science”

During the 2015 World Science Festival held recently in New York City, the Mount Sinai Health System sponsored a roundtable discussion titled, “Spotlight: Women in Science,” featuring four trailblazers from diverse disciplines, including Patricia Kovatch, Founding Associate Dean for Scientific Computing at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. In a casual setting complete with cocktails and hors d’oeuvres, Ms. Kovatch and her three co-panelists—anthropologist Dean Falk, PhD; marine chemical biologist Mandë Holford, PhD; and space scientist Tara M. Ruttley, PhD—discussed their life’s work, what inspires them, and their triumphs and challenges.