Mount Sinai Physicians Treat Players at the US Open

Two world-class orthopaedists at the Mount Sinai Health System worked behind the scenes at the 2014 US Open, treating an array of health problems incurred by players at the popular tennis tournament, which ran from Monday, August 25, through Monday, September 8, in Flushing Meadows, Queens. The Mount Sinai Hospital is the official hospital of the US Open and the United States Tennis Association (USTA).

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A Leader in Ophthalmology Joins Mount Sinai

James C. Tsai, MD, MBA, a world-renowned physician-scientist with a research focus on glaucoma, has been named President of New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai (NYEE) and Chair of Ophthalmology of the Mount Sinai Health System. As President, Dr. Tsai says his main goals will be raising the visibility of NYEE to referring physicians, and ensuring that it is known as an international center of excellence in residency and fellowship training in ophthalmology and otolaryngology.

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Health Care Delivery Leadership Program Launches

The opportunity to reduce health care costs without compromising quality makes this an exciting time to be a leader in the field of health care delivery, says Peter R. Orszag, PhD, Vice Chairman of Corporate and Investment Banking, Chairman of the Public Sector Group, and Chairman of the Financial Strategy and Solutions Group at Citigroup, Inc.

Dr. Orszag, a member of the Mount Sinai Health System Boards of Trustees, shared this encouraging message during a conference on Tuesday, August 26, to kick off Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai’s new Master of Science in Health Care Delivery Leadership program. Classes for the first year of the program started during the final week of August.

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Study Reveals Common Genetic Changes Are Significant in Autism

Genetic changes are responsible for roughly 60 percent of the risk for autism, and most of these variants are commonly found in the general population, according to a groundbreaking study led by Joseph D. Buxbaum, PhD, Director of the Seaver Autism Center for Research and Treatment, and Professor of Psychiatry, Neuroscience, and Genetics and Genomic Sciences at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

The remaining nongenetic factors that account for roughly 40 percent of the risk for autism are not known. However, environmental factors and the interaction between genes and the environment may be a part of these nongenetic factors, says Dr. Buxbaum, the G. Harold and Leila Y. Mathers Research Professor of Geriatrics and Adult Development at Icahn School of Medicine.

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Reducing Sepsis Mortality Rates

A novel program implemented across the Emergency Department and all inpatient units at The Mount Sinai Hospital is being credited with helping the hospital achieve a three-year reduction in sepsis mortality.

The “Stop Sepsis Program” is based upon a project developed in 2011 by the Department of Emergency Medicine and the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine to enhance the early identification and management of patients with suspected sepsis, a condition that results from infection and can quickly become life-threatening when it impairs blood flow to organs.

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Mount Sinai to Open Kidney Stone Center

A comprehensive outpatient Kidney Stone Center, which will offer patients new minimally invasive techniques and a holistic approach to prevention, will be the first of its kind in New York City when it opens this fall in two Manhattan locations.

The Center will be headed by Mantu Gupta, MD, who was recently named Director of Endourology and Stone Disease for the Mount Sinai Health System, Chair of Urology at Mount Sinai Roosevelt and Mount Sinai St. Luke’s, and Professor of Urology.

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Teaching Heart-Healthy Habits to High-Risk Children and Families

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has received a $3.8 million grant from the American Heart Association (AHA) to promote cardiovascular health through early education and intervention programs targeting high-risk children and their parents in Harlem and the Bronx.

Mount Sinai researchers will study the genes and lifestyles of 600 preschoolers and their parents or guardians who live in these communities, which are associated with high rates of obesity, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. The investigators will track whether the interventions lead to healthier eating habits and additional exercise. They will also examine the participants’ DNA and RNA to understand how genetics plays a role in the development of cardiovascular disease.

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