Tennis Elbow

Tennis elbow is a common injury found in tennis players and other sports. The pain is on the outside of the elbow, where the wrist extensor muscles originate, and is usually tender when palpated. The pain is worsened with hand shaking, opening jars, using a knife or fork or even using a toothbrush. Tennis elbow is more common in males, and those in the range of 30-50 years of age. It is important, however, to remember that people outside this age range also get tennis elbow frequently. Tennis players make up the majority of cases, but it is also found among baseball players, gardeners, house or office cleaners, carpenters, mechanics, and golfers.

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The Mount Sinai Hospital Ranks among the Top in “Best Hospitals” Guidebook

The Mount Sinai Hospital has been ranked No. 16 out of nearly 5,000 hospitals nationwide in the U.S. News & World Report 2014–15 “Best Hospitals” guidebook. Additionally, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai achieved a No. 10 national ranking for Ophthalmology, while Mount Sinai Beth Israel and Mount Sinai St. Luke’s/Mount Sinai Roosevelt attained “high-performing” designations in a total of 11 specialties.

Further, according to U.S. News & World Report, The Mount Sinai Hospital is one of only 17 hospitals to receive “very high scores” in at least six clinical specialties, earning it Honor Roll status.

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Leading Conversations on the Future of Health Care at the Aspen Ideas Festival

The future of medicine, maintaining an edge in biomedical innovation, and the cost of health care in America were among the topics explored by Mount Sinai Health System leaders during the 2014 Aspen Ideas Festival, a yearly conclave that attracts several thousand policy makers, innovators, entrepreneurs, and executives who participate in thought-provoking discussions on health care and other major issues that impact America.

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Kravis Children’s Hospital Ranks Among Nation’s Top Pediatric Centers

Kravis Children’s Hospital at Mount Sinai is nationally ranked in seven out of the ten pediatric specialties measured by U.S. News & World Report in its 2014-15 “Best Children’s Hospital” annual guidebook. Notably, for the first time, Kravis Children’s Hospital is ranked in neurology & neurosurgery, and neonatology.

The seven specialties are diabetes & endocrinology (No. 22), nephrology (No. 29), neurology & neurosurgery (No. 29), pulmonology (No. 30), gastroenterology & GI surgery (No. 40), neonatology (No. 49), and urology (No. 50). To develop the rankings, U.S. News & World Report surveyed 183 pediatric centers to obtain clinical data in each of the 10 specialties measured, and also asked 150 pediatric specialists in each specialty where they would refer their sickest patients.

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Mount Sinai Doctors Among the Best in New York

The Mount Sinai Health System was highly represented in New York magazine’s recently released list of “Best Doctors in New York,” which named 227 physicians from all seven hospitals and 36 doctors from Mount Sinai’s affiliated hospitals. The 263 physicians represented 21 percent of the total 1,251 doctors on New York magazine’s 2014 list, which appeared online and in the June 9-15, 2014 print edition. The list covers physicians from throughout the New York metropolitan region, including Connecticut and New Jersey.

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Rosacea: myths, reality and treatment

What is rosacea?

Rosacea is a skin condition in which your face tends to appear red and inflamed with periods of worsening and improvement over months to years. Individuals with rosacea may flush easily or develop what looks like acne breakouts. It can occur in all ages or ethnicities but tends to be most common in white, middle-aged adults.

How common is rosacea?

Rosacea is extremely common with an estimated 14 million Americans suffering from the condition. Some notable sufferers include former President Bill Clinton, J.P. Morgan, W.C. Fields, Rembrandt and Rosie O’Donnell — not to mention Santa Claus and, most likely, Rudolph!

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Cleft and Craniofacial Myths

July is Cleft and Craniofacial Awareness Month. Here are the most common myths about this disease that I hear from my patients.

Myth:

Children with clefts and craniofacial anomalies do not require specialty care.

Reality:

Patients born with a birth defect involving the head and neck should be seen soon after birth – either in the hospital at the time of delivery or soon after discharge as an outpatient – by a team of expert clinicians from different specialties. In this type of setting, the clinical team can assess what problems exist and how best to improve them.

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Remembering D-Day 70 Years Later

“I thought I would never live to see the end of that day,” said Mount Sinai Beth Israel patient Robert Cohen, recollecting his experience as a young U.S. infantryman landing on Utah Beach on June 6, 1944. Mr. Cohen spent the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landing with Alene, his wife of 66 years, his son Michael, two of his eight grandchildren, and Mount Sinai Beth Israel staff, discussing the events of that day, when he was one of 20,000 Allied troops landing at Utah Beach, the westernmost flank of the Normandy invasion.

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