LASIK Center Opens

The Laser Vision Correction Center at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai—the first refractive surgery center within the Mount Sinai Health System—recently celebrated its opening. Located at 230 Second Avenue, the new facility offers photorefractive keratectomy, custom LASIK, and IntraLASIK—the first blade-free laser technology that enables physicians to customize vision correction for each patient. Laser vision correction, also known as refractive surgery, treats nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism, helping to eliminate the need for eyeglasses and contact lenses for many patients. The surgery corrects vision by changing the shape of the cornea, the transparent layer that covers the outer surface of the eye.

A Social Media Guideline For Physicians: Should Joining Twitter Be a Professional Priority?

There are thousands of physicians, medical students and other health care professionals on Twitter, but many individuals are afraid to join Twitter because of the unknowns and potential pitfalls. Here are 5 reasons medical professionals are apprehensive about utilizing Twitter and why you should join anyway.

1. You’re nervous you’ll post something stupid.

This one is easy. Don’t post anything you don’t want the whole world to see. Twitter is a public forum and anything you post is public, searchable, and re-tweetable. Yes, you can delete a post, but it may be too late. For example, someone could have already taken a screenshot of the tweet, or have the tweet text saved in their email notifications. But this shouldn’t scare you. Before posting things on Twitter, you first have to join and see how other people use Twitter. Once you have a feel for it, go ahead and post. You can start off by posting general information, and once you are comfortable with this medium you can start conversing with others and giving opinions. And yes, always think twice before you post anything. Read more

Mount Sinai Embraces a New Era in Digital Health Care

A new telehealth initiative run by the Mount Sinai Health System allows patients and their primary care physicians to hold “virtual” appointments or videoconferences for nonurgent follow-up visits. Designed to improve care and enhance convenience, the program can be accessed through an iPhone or Android smartphone app. It is expected to be particularly beneficial for patients with chronic illnesses who require medical management, or those with nonurgent infections—an upper respiratory illness, for example—who require follow-up care. Read more

Developing Apps to Improve the Health of Patients

The Sinai AppLab, a pioneering digital initiative between the departments of Medicine and Information Technology, is creating technology platforms to address the needs of patients, health care providers, and researchers within the Mount Sinai Health System. Under the direction of Ashish Atreja, MD, MPH, Chief Technology Innovation and Engagement Officer in the Department of Medicine, the lab has developed five apps and an app platform that connect to Mount Sinai’s Electronic Health Records (EHR). Read more

Mount Sinai Health System Offers Free Skin Cancer Screenings

The Mount Sinai Health System invited staff, their friends and families, and the public, to learn about skin cancer prevention and receive a free, total-body skin examination during National Skin Cancer Awareness Month in May. The screenings took place in the dermatology departments of The Mount Sinai Hospital, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Mount Sinai Roosevelt, and, for the first time, at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s. At The Mount Sinai Hospital, 97 people were examined; 81 at Mount Sinai Beth Israel; 77 at Mount Sinai Roosevelt; and 22 at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s.

Singing the Praises of Mount Sinai’s Voice Center

Helena-Joyce Wright enjoyed a successful career on Broadway, hitting the low notes as a powerful contralto/alto singer for more than three decades. But after undergoing a series of surgeries starting in 2011 to treat cancer, Ms. Wright, a longtime smoker, thought her career was coming to an end.

That is when she began therapy sessions with Daniel McCabe, DMA, a vocologist at the Eugen Grabscheid MD Voice Center at the Mount Sinai Health System, who told her he was surprised she still had such “incredible range,” despite her continued smoking. He asked her, “Wouldn’t you like to see just how good it could be?” That question was all the encouragement she needed to stop smoking for good. Read more

Bridge Walk Raises Awareness and Funds

Nearly 200 Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency patients, friends, and family members donned red T-shirts and walked from Fort Lee, N.J., to Manhattan and back on Saturday, May 2, raising more than $25,000 to support research for the hereditary condition. The eighth annual George Washington Bridge Walk was organized by the James P. Mara Center for Lung Disease, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai Roosevelt. Read more

Deep Brain Stimulation Helps Triathlete Get Back in the Race

A brain surgery while I’m awake? That sounds like a science fiction novel to most of us. However, it’s now a reality with DBS.

What is Deep Brain Stimulation?

Deep Brain Stimulation, or DBS, is a brain surgery designed to help improve the symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease, Dystonia, Essential Tremor, and other neurological conditions by using a pacemaker for the brain. With our focused multidisciplinary team and testing procedures, we are able to determine which patients will benefit most. Once a patient is deemed to be an optimal candidate for DBS, surgery is scheduled. Depending on the patient’s diagnosis and treatment plan, 2 or 3 surgeries will be required. Read more

Kidney Stone Center Opens

The Kidney Stone Center at Mount Sinai opened with a ribbon-cutting ceremony and reception on Monday, April 20, at Mount Sinai Roosevelt’s Department of Urology. The new Center offers a comprehensive approach to manage and treat kidney stones, with a focus on prevention. “We have an integrated team of urologists, nephrologists, and other specialists who employ a wide range of noninvasive and minimally invasive procedures to treat and prevent all sizes and types of kidney stones,” says Mantu Gupta, MD, Chair of Urology at Mount Sinai Roosevelt and Mount Sinai St. Luke’s, and Director of Endourology and Stone Disease for the Mount Sinai Health System. The Center has two locations: Mount Sinai Roosevelt, 425 West 59th Street, Suite 4F, and 625 Madison Avenue, Second Floor.

Students Host Community Health Fair

More than 100 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai students hosted the 12th Annual Mount Sinai Community Health Fair on Saturday, April 11—an event dedicated to improving the health of residents in East and Central Harlem, neighborhoods that have experienced a disproportionate burden of chronic disease and illness. Forty community organizations took part, including the East Harlem Health Outreach Partnership, Settlement Health, and Boriken Neighborhood Health Center. The fair offered 19 kinds of health screenings, including blood pressure, diabetes, hearing and vision, adolescent health conditions, obesity, and HIV. The estimated 200 adult and children attendees were also treated to live music, healthy food samples, and family fun activities. The event was made possible by funding from the Mount Sinai Auxiliary Board, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Student Council, and the Center for Multicultural and Community Affairs.