Mount Sinai Doctors Among the Best in New York

The Mount Sinai Health System was highly represented in New York magazine’s recently released list of “Best Doctors in New York,” which named 227 physicians from all seven hospitals and 36 doctors from Mount Sinai’s affiliated hospitals. The 263 physicians represented 21 percent of the total 1,251 doctors on New York magazine’s 2014 list, which appeared online and in the June 9-15, 2014 print edition. The list covers physicians from throughout the New York metropolitan region, including Connecticut and New Jersey.

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Rosacea: myths, reality and treatment

What is rosacea?

Rosacea is a skin condition in which your face tends to appear red and inflamed with periods of worsening and improvement over months to years. Individuals with rosacea may flush easily or develop what looks like acne breakouts. It can occur in all ages or ethnicities but tends to be most common in white, middle-aged adults.

How common is rosacea?

Rosacea is extremely common with an estimated 14 million Americans suffering from the condition. Some notable sufferers include former President Bill Clinton, J.P. Morgan, W.C. Fields, Rembrandt and Rosie O’Donnell — not to mention Santa Claus and, most likely, Rudolph!

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Cleft and Craniofacial Myths

July is Cleft and Craniofacial Awareness Month. Here are the most common myths about this disease that I hear from my patients.

Myth:

Children with clefts and craniofacial anomalies do not require specialty care.

Reality:

Patients born with a birth defect involving the head and neck should be seen soon after birth – either in the hospital at the time of delivery or soon after discharge as an outpatient – by a team of expert clinicians from different specialties. In this type of setting, the clinical team can assess what problems exist and how best to improve them.

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Remembering D-Day 70 Years Later

“I thought I would never live to see the end of that day,” said Mount Sinai Beth Israel patient Robert Cohen, recollecting his experience as a young U.S. infantryman landing on Utah Beach on June 6, 1944. Mr. Cohen spent the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landing with Alene, his wife of 66 years, his son Michael, two of his eight grandchildren, and Mount Sinai Beth Israel staff, discussing the events of that day, when he was one of 20,000 Allied troops landing at Utah Beach, the westernmost flank of the Normandy invasion.

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Mount Sinai Volunteers with Saving Mothers to Bring Better Prenatal Care to Guatemala

Mount Sinai Physician Assistant, Jessica Oliveira and Dr. Taraneh Shirazian, Director of Mount Sinai Global Women’s Health, attended a graduation this past May in Santiago, Guatemala.

The graduation marked the end of a 16-week program for 22 comadronas (birth attendants) enrolled in the school of POWHER (Providing Outreach in Women’s Health Education and Resources). The school is funded by Saving Mothers, a 501c3 nonprofit dedicated to reducing maternal mortality and morbidity, for which Dr. Shirazian is the co-founder and Medical Director.

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Caring For Those in the Second Decade of Life

There are more than 42 million adolescents between the ages of 10-19 in the United States. Worldwide one in six people is a teenager. As recently noted by the World Health Organization, “Promoting healthy practices during adolescence, and taking steps to better protect young people from health risks are critical for the prevention of health problems in adulthood, and for countries’ future health and social infrastructure.” In other words, if we want to keep our communities healthy, teen health is essential.

Since the mid-20th century, the health field has recognized the unique needs of adolescents and their right to developmentally appropriate services that openly address the health and behavioral realities of teen life. Today, adolescent medicine is an established field as a sub-specialty of pediatrics. MDs with training in pediatrics, family medicine, or internal medicine can enter adolescent medicine fellowship programs.

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Melanoma, the deadliest and most preventable skin disease

Melanoma is the deadliest and most preventable skin disease. It is a skin cancer arising from melanocytes, skin cells that carry pigment also know as melanin, which gives skin its color. Melanocytes are the cells that also form benign (non-cancerous) moles known as nevi. The distinction between harmless moles and potentially deadly melanoma can be challenging even for the most experienced dermatologists.

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Even Soccer Players Suffer Broken Noses

Soccer fans across the United States were thrilled with the US team’s opening game victory against Ghana. For those watching the game live, along with a great match, they also witnessed US star Clint Dempsey suffer a blow to the nose and a possible nasal fracture. While active Americans suffer many of the same injuries as their sport heroes, injuries to the nose and face are common for weekend warriors along with the parents of children involved in sports. The bleeding and possible disfigurement associated with facial trauma and nasal fractures can be a cause of great anxiety for patients or the parents of injured children.

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