Mount Sinai to Open Kidney Stone Center

A comprehensive outpatient Kidney Stone Center, which will offer patients new minimally invasive techniques and a holistic approach to prevention, will be the first of its kind in New York City when it opens this fall in two Manhattan locations.

The Center will be headed by Mantu Gupta, MD, who was recently named Director of Endourology and Stone Disease for the Mount Sinai Health System, Chair of Urology at Mount Sinai Roosevelt and Mount Sinai St. Luke’s, and Professor of Urology.

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Eye Safety Tips Over Labor Day Weekend

In the U.S., more than 9,000 fireworks injuries happen each year, with roughly 1 in 8 fireworks injuries harming the eyes. With Labor Day weekend celebrations approaching, Dr. Ronald C. Gentile, Professor of Ophthalmology and the Chief of Ocular Trauma Service at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, wants to remind people of some eye health and fireworks safety tips.

“Common fireworks and sparkler eye injuries include burns, lacerations, abrasions, retinal detachment, optic nerve damage and ruptured eyeball,” says Dr. Gentile. “And children are frequent victims of these injuries. As many as 30 percent of eye traumas caused by fireworks impact kids.”

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The Rundown On The Rotator Cuff

With the US Open upon us, many of us are ready to start gearing up our tennis playing. However, you might ask yourself, are my knees and shoulders up for the challenge? Many of us might be scared of the dreaded rotator cuff injury and fearful of a scenario similar to that of Novak Djokovic prior to winning Wimbledon. Luckily, Djokovic did not tear his rotator cuff and with the right knowledge about the cuff, you can avoid serious injury as well.

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Sharing My Personal Experiences With Hepatitis C Treatment (Part II)

Read Part I of my story at http://blog.mountsinai.org/blog/hepatitisc-treatment

My name is Andrew Styles and I have Hepatitis C. Hepatitis C is a liver infection caused by a virus. Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver, an organ that carries out over 500 functions that keep you healthy. I just successfully completed a new treatment for Hepatitis C (Hep C) and want to inspire others to get tested and treated. I was treated in the past with serious side effects, but this time was different.

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Teaching Heart-Healthy Habits to High-Risk Children and Families

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has received a $3.8 million grant from the American Heart Association (AHA) to promote cardiovascular health through early education and intervention programs targeting high-risk children and their parents in Harlem and the Bronx.

Mount Sinai researchers will study the genes and lifestyles of 600 preschoolers and their parents or guardians who live in these communities, which are associated with high rates of obesity, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. The investigators will track whether the interventions lead to healthier eating habits and additional exercise. They will also examine the participants’ DNA and RNA to understand how genetics plays a role in the development of cardiovascular disease.

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Young Patients Help Design Reception Area

Pediatric patients and their families recently joined artist and designer Edin Rudic in creating a new interior wall design for the Food for Life program in the Mount Sinai Health System’s Clinic for Inherited Metabolic Diseases. Mr. Rudic donated his services to create the new design located in the reception area of the Medical Genetics Clinic. It incorporates a high-definition screen display of patient photos, and specially coated walls on which children can draw, adding fun to their hospital visits.

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Super Foods: The Tennis Edition

Sweating it out on the court day after day is a great way to become a better tennis player, but don’t forget that one of the most essential components of your training happens off the court. Proper nutrition is often the missing link needed to help maximize your training and reach performance goals. Fuel up on these six super foods and gear up for a great season!

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How to Stay Hydrated during the Summer

It’s summer (finally!), and there’s nothing better than some quality playing-time in beautiful weather. But, with the mercury rising, dehydration is a serious concern whether you’re having a marathon practice session or match, and can affect performance when as little as 2% of your body mass is lost through sweat. Since tennis players can lose more than 2.5 liters of sweat per hour in warm weather, it’s easy to fall behind on your fluid intake if you’re not careful.

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Plantar Fasciitis: A Primer

With summer now in full swing, many of us will be out running, trying our best at soccer to support the World Cup and gearing up our tennis skills with the French and US Open upon us. But since many of us are not pros, we may succumb to plantar fasciitis.

Plantar fasciitis (PF) is the most common cause of foot pain, and odds are if you’re active in exercise or an athlete, you probably have suffered through it. It’s characterized by inflammation of the tendons and muscles of the foot and calf where they insert on your heel, and is usually burning and sharp in sensation and worst with walking when you wake in the morning. You are at risk if you have flat feet, a leg length discrepancy, stand for long periods of time on hard surfaces, and are overweight.

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