The Benefits of Dark Chocolate for Valentine’s Day (Recipe Included!)

For centuries before becoming the sweet treat we know today, chocolate, the product of fermented cacao beans, was used as medicine. Early Aztec cultures concocted remedies using cocoa from the “chocolate tree” to ease intestinal complaints and upset stomach, control diarrhea, reduce fevers, and boost strength before military conquests. Later eras linked chocolate to other properties, such as a cure for “chocolatomania” cravings in the mid-1900s, which were believed to occur in young women.

Read more

Expertise in Mitral Valve Repair

Mitral Valve Prolapse (MVP) is a common heart valve abnormality that affects up to 5 percent of the U.S. population. The mitral valve controls the flow of blood from the lungs to the main pumping chamber of the heart. MVP results from a degeneration of valve structure that leads to a regurgitation of blood backwards that can result in heart enlargement and weakening, as well as fatigue and shortness of breath.

Read more

A Leader in Cardiovascular Care for HIV Patients

What started as a casual observation among physicians almost a decade ago—that patients with HIV tend to develop hypertension and have a greater risk of heart attacks than the general population—has become a formal area of study and treatment within the Mount Sinai Health System.

Under the direction of Merle Myerson, MD, EdD, Director of the St. Luke’s Roosevelt Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, and Director of the Cardiology Section of the Spencer Cox Center for Health, patients with HIV are being closely monitored and treated for heart disease and stroke. In fact, cardiovascular care has become increasingly critical to the overall health of HIV patients, as more of them live well into their 70s and 80s.

Read more

Skin Care Over 50

As we age our skin changes in many ways. For one, it loses some of the underlying layers of fat that give us a youthful appearance. Our skin also loses elasticity and tone, which leads to wrinkles, and becomes less able to retain moisture. The oil production glands on the face become smaller, as well.

While these changes are a normal part of aging, there are some things that can be done to slow the process and mask some of the appearance. Keep in mind that the key to skin care over the age of 50 is prevention, and consider adopting these healthy skin practices:

How to Boost Your Health with Allium Vegetables (Recipe Included!)

Allium vegetables comprise approximately 500 species, the most common including onions, leeks, garlic, chives, and shallots. They have been valued throughout history for their flavor as well as their medicinal properties. Rich in health-promoting flavanols and organosulfur compounds, alliums have increasingly attracted the interest of the medical community for their potential to play a part in preventing cancer.

Read more