Mount Sinai Opens a Comprehensive Center For Transgender Medicine and Surgery

Dr. David L. Reich President and Chief Operating Officer of The Mount Sinai Hospital Photo © Robert Caplin Image licensed for internal newsletter ONLY. Further usage will need to be licensed with the photographer Robert Caplin, robert@robertcaplin.com 212-699-0887

From left: Barbara E. Warren, PsyD; Jess Ting, MD; Matt Baney; David L. Reich, MD; Pamela Abner, MPA; and Zil Garner Goldstein, FNP

The Mount Sinai Health System recently opened the Center for Transgender Medicine and Surgery, one of the first centers of its kind in the United States to provide the transgender community with comprehensive primary, specialty, surgical, and behavioral health care services.

The Center serves a growing need to support patients in New York City through each stage of their journeys, from initial assessment and screening to hormonal therapy, surgery, and post-transition care, providing seamless access to affordable care. Gynecology, urology, endocrinology, social work, and nursing are among the specialties available at one location. Read more

Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder Newborn Intensive Care Unit Unveiled at Kravis Children’s Hospital

Jo Carole_Ronald_S_Lauder_0137_348A1341-RT

Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder

The newly constructed Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) opened on Monday, April 4, following a complete renovation and expansion that transformed the unit into a family-centered, therapeutic space equipped with the latest technology.

The NICU is a Level III Regional Perinatal Center, which is the highest designation for complex pediatric care, and provides consultative services to other regional neonatal units. It is located on the third floor of the Klingenstein Pavilion at the Kravis Children’s Hospital at Mount Sinai. Read more

Ambulatory Pavilion Planned for Mount Sinai St.Luke’s

StLukeRendering

Artist’s rendering of the new ambulatory pavilion at Amsterdam Avenue and 114th Street

Renovation is set to begin this fall on a 17-floor ambulatory pavilion at Amsterdam Avenue and 114th Street that will serve as the anchor in a new master plan to transform Mount Sinai St. Luke’s outpatient care. The state-of-the-art facility will expand the hospital’s primary, preventive, and specialty care, and foster integration with all departments within the Mount Sinai Health System. Read more

Bedside Medication Delivery Program for Patients

IMG_4030

Patient Rosalene Dennis, center, learns about the medications she will need post-discharge from Lisa Martin, RN. The medications were delivered to her bedside through a new partnership with CVS Health. At left is Judith Maria, the CVS Concierge assigned to the program.

More than 300 patients at The Mount Sinai Hospital have participated in a new partnership with CVS Health that allows them to receive the delivery of their medications to the bedside prior to discharge. The service, launched earlier this year as a pilot program, is currently available in 15 units and will be rolled out to 28 units by mid-July. “We are very excited about this innovative collaboration,” says David L. Reich, MD, President and Chief Operating Officer, The Mount Sinai Hospital. “This service is not only a convenience for our patients, but also enhances the ability of our staff to communicate more effectively about post-discharge medications. This will undoubtedly help some of our patients achieve improved clinical outcomes.”

Transforming Health Care at Mount Sinai Downtown

New York Eye and Ear Infirmary (NYEE) of Mount Sinai

New York Eye and Ear Infirmary (NYEE) of Mount Sinai

As the nation’s emphasis on health care shifts from centralized hospitals that serve the sick to more proactive ways of keeping people healthy, and as more surgeries are safely handled in ambulatory settings, fewer hospitals will be needed.

This transformation is happening throughout New York City. A recent report by the New York Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC), titled “One New York – Healthcare for Our Neighborhoods,” cited the closure of 19 city hospitals since 2003 and annual declines in the use of city hospital beds. The HHC report noted that New York City is increasingly moving toward a “system anchored by community-based preventive care.” Read more

A Paradigm Shift in Health Care Delivery

Medical Treatment at Home

An innovative program being run by the Mount Sinai Health System has shown that certain acute-care patients who choose to be treated at home rather than in a hospital are not only more satisfied with their care but also have lower medical costs and fewer medical complications.

These findings come amid the halfway point of a three-year plan that was launched by Mount Sinai in November 2014 after receiving a $9.6 million Health Care Innovation Award from the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to create a unique “hospital at home” program.

Known as the Mobile Acute Care Team (MACT), the program illustrates Mount Sinai’s commitment to being on the cutting edge of the way medicine will be practiced and creating an innovative health care system for the future, one that emphasizes outpatient, ambulatory, and home-based care with remote monitoring capabilities. The award further highlights Mount Sinai’s role as a pioneer in developing a new clinical and financial reimbursement model for patients with acute illnesses. Read more

A New Vision of Mount Sinai Downtown

Inside CoverSweeping change in the practice of health care is leading to a transformation in the Mount Sinai Health System’s downtown footprint. A planned investment of more than $500 million will create the new “Mount Sinai Downtown,” an expanded and unified network of facilities—stretching from the East River to the Hudson River—that will provide highly skilled emergency care, urgent care, outpatient, inpatient, and ambulatory services to people living and working in New York City below 34th Street. Read more

Oral, Head and Neck Cancer Screenings

Dr Miles and Karen doing exam 4-16-RT

At The Mount Sinai Hospital, Brett Miles, MD, DDS, examines Karen Manansala, Financial Coordinator, Guggenheim Pavilion Center 1, Lauder Family Cardiovascular Ambulatory Center, for signs of oral cancer.

Nearly 300 visitors and staff received free mouth and throat screenings at Mount Sinai Beth Israel and The Mount Sinai Hospital during Oral, Head and Neck Cancer Awareness Month in April. Free educational material about oropharyngeal cancer and its association with the human papillomavirus (HPV)—which accounts for nearly 85 percent of new cases—also was available at both campuses. “Patients who have oropharyngeal cancer caused by HPV and receive timely treatment have better survival rates than those who don’t act quickly,” says Brett Miles, MD, DDS, Associate Professor of Otolaryngology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Head and Neck Surgeon at the Head and Neck Institute. Other risk factors for oral cancer include alcohol and tobacco use.

Leadership and Staff Celebrate National Walking Day

NationalWalk_043-RT

There was heavy rain on National Walking Day, so leadership and staff took to The Mount Sinai Hospital’s one-mile, indoor walking route.

Several hundred Mount Sinai Health System employees laced up their sneakers and participated in a number of 30-minute, lunchtime walks in their hospital campus communities on Thursday, April 7, National Walking Day, to raise awareness of the benefits of walking for cardiovascular health. Sponsored by the American Heart Association, National Walking Day calls on all individuals, communities, and workplaces to help in the fight against heart disease by increasing and encouraging physical activity. “Walking at lunchtime is an easy way to fit daily exercise into your busy life,” says Beth Oliver, DNP, RN, Senior Vice President of Cardiac Services for the Mount Sinai Health System.

Enhancing Employee Health at Mount Sinai

Enhancing Employee Health at Mount Sinai

Dietitian Maria Elena Rodriguez, RD, CDE, center, helped Mount Sinai employees Angela Mazzone, left, and Valerie Ruffin achieve a healthier lifestyle.

Valerie Ruffin, an Executive Assistant in the Department of Information Technology, thought that drinking homemade fruit juices was a good way to improve her health and lose weight—until she had a physical exam in 2015. “I was in shock when I was told I had diabetes,” she recalls. “My blood work showed extremely high sugar levels, the result of all the fruit juice I was drinking daily.”

Colleague Angela Mazzone, Project Manager III, Department of Information Technology, was similarly surprised when her physical exam uncovered glucose levels consistent with pre-diabetes. She always thought of herself as a healthy eater, and athletic, but the diagnosis forced her to re-examine that perception. She was now a working mom and, in reality, she was devoting less time to exercising and preparing nutritious meals. Read more