Enhancing Employee Health at Mount Sinai

Enhancing Employee Health at Mount Sinai

Dietitian Maria Elena Rodriguez, RD, CDE, center, helped Mount Sinai employees Angela Mazzone, left, and Valerie Ruffin achieve a healthier lifestyle.

Valerie Ruffin, an Executive Assistant in the Department of Information Technology, thought that drinking homemade fruit juices was a good way to improve her health and lose weight—until she had a physical exam in 2015. “I was in shock when I was told I had diabetes,” she recalls. “My blood work showed extremely high sugar levels, the result of all the fruit juice I was drinking daily.”

Colleague Angela Mazzone, Project Manager III, Department of Information Technology, was similarly surprised when her physical exam uncovered glucose levels consistent with pre-diabetes. She always thought of herself as a healthy eater, and athletic, but the diagnosis forced her to re-examine that perception. She was now a working mom and, in reality, she was devoting less time to exercising and preparing nutritious meals. Read more

Morningside Clinic Moves to a Newly Renovated Location

Morningside Clinic Moves to a Newly Renovated LocationThe Institute for Advanced Medicine has relocated the Spencer Cox Morningside Clinic to renovated space at 440 West 114th Street and renamed it the Morningside Clinic. The new site provides patients with a more convenient and comfortable setting that includes a spacious waiting room with a television, and a pediatric waiting area. The Morningside Clinic continues to provide patients with HIV/AIDS treatment and other services, including dental, integrative medicine, and behavioral health care. The attendees at a recent ribbon-cutting ceremony (see photo) included, from left: Vani P. Gandhi, MD, Interim Medical Director, Morningside Clinic, and Assistant Clinical Professor, Medicine (Infectious Diseases), Mount Sinai St. Luke’s; Michael P. Mullen, MD, Director, and Matt Baney, Senior Director, Institute for Advanced Medicine; and Judith A. Aberg, MD, Dr. George Baehr Professor of Clinical Medicine, and Division Chief, Infectious Diseases.

Nutrition and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

ilana kersch headshot

Guest post by Ilana Kersch, MS RD CDN, Senior Dietitian at the Mount Sinai Hospital.  Ilana works as part of the inpatient liver transplant team in conjunction with the Recanati Miller Transplant Institute, and provides nutrition care for patients pre- and post-hepatobiliary surgery.

In recent decades, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become an important cause of liver disease in the US due to its association with rising prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes.  It is estimated that approximately 30% of the US population now has some degree of non-alcoholic fatty liver, and ~2- 5% of the population have fatty liver which has progressed to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).  If untreated, NAFLD and NASH can progress to liver cirrhosis and malignancy, and is quickly becoming a major indication for listing for liver transplant. Read more

New CT Scanner to Help Provide Rapid Care

CT-Scanner-5316_11-RTMount Sinai Brooklyn recently acquired an additional CT scanner to decrease waiting time and expedite results for patients who need immediate testing, such as people who may have had a stroke. Located near the Emergency Department, it features 128-slice technology that provides high-definition imaging details and performs CT angiograms. Among the attendees at a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Thursday, March 31, were, from left: GraceAnn Weick, ANP, MSN, Chief Operating Officer and Vice President, Patient Care Services, Mount Sinai Brooklyn; Burton P. Drayer, MD, Dr. Charles M. and Marilyn Newman Professor and System Chair, Department of Radiology; Lin H. Mo, MBA, MPH, President, Mount Sinai Brooklyn; Carl Ramsay, MD, Vice President, Emergency Medicine Clinical Operations, Mount Sinai Health System; and Scott M. Lorin, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Mount Sinai Brooklyn.

Physical Fitness in Late Adolescence May Reduce The Risk of Developing Adult-Onset Diabetes

Casey Crump, MD, PhD

Casey Crump, MD, PhD

Physical fitness in late adolescence may reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life, according to a new study from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai that appeared online in the March 8, 2016, issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Researchers—led by Casey Crump, MD, PhD, Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai—evaluated data on the aerobic capacity of 1.5 million males who were military conscripts in Sweden between 1969 and 1997. The scientists then compared the men’s aerobic capacity to their medical diagnoses that were made between 1987 and 2012, when the men were a maximum age of 62. Read more

Malnutrition

socialmedia-alysiaphotoGuest post by Alysia Johansson MS RD CDN, Clinical Nutrition Coordinator at The Mount Sinai Hospital. Alysia has been at Mount Sinai since 2011 where she works as part of the interdisciplinary Cardiothoracic ICU team. Alysia also coordinates malnutrition efforts for the Clinical Nutrition Department and will be presenting at an upcoming conference on April 21 2016 at The Mount Sinai Hospital, Malnutrition: Implementing Strategies for Medical Nutrition Therapy.

Malnutrition has been recognized as a problem in hospitalized patients for over 40 years. Malnutrition is any disorder of nutrition resulting from unbalanced or insufficient diet, increased needs, or impaired absorption, utilization, or excretion of nutrients – all in the presence or absence of inflammation. Malnutrition contributes to a multitude of poor patient outcomes including decreased function and quality of life, decreased wound healing, anemia, increased risk of infection, increased risk for developing pressure ulcers, increased risk of surgical complications, increased mortality, increased frequency of hospital admissions and increased length of hospital stay. Aside from being detrimental to care, all of these outcomes lead to higher healthcare costs. For these reasons, it is imperative that clinicians be aware of the signs of malnutrition, and take proper measures to enhance the nutritional status of their patients.  Read more

Raising Awareness About Colon Cancer

The Mount Sinai Hospital’s Endoscopy Center team, along with Mount Sinai staff and volunteers and members of the Colon Cancer Challenge Foundation, in front of the “Rollin’ Colon” educational exhibit.

The Mount Sinai Hospital’s Endoscopy Center team, along with Mount Sinai staff and volunteers and members of the Colon Cancer Challenge Foundation, in front of the “Rollin’ Colon” educational exhibit.

Nearly 1,000 people participated in Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month activities on Wednesday, March 2, at The Mount Sinai Hospital. Visitors picked up educational literature and giveaways, and walked through a 30-ft. inflatable model of a colon, known as the “Rollin’ Colon”—provided by the Colon Cancer Challenge Foundation—that exhibits polyps and other signs of colon cancer. They also had the opportunity to talk with nurses, physicians, geneticists, nutritionists, and endoscopy staff. Forty seven attendees signed up for a screening colonoscopy. The event was hosted by The Mount Sinai Hospital Endoscopy Center.

New Technology That Serves as an Artificial Pancreas Is Revolutionizing the Management of Type 1 Diabetes

New Technology That Serves as an Artificial Pancreas Is Revolutionizing the Management of Type 1 Diabetes

The AP (Artificial Pancreas) system runs an algorithm on a smartphone that communicates with an insulin pump and an implanted glucose sensor.

Research under way at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is revolutionizing the management of type 1 diabetes by using novel technology that serves as an artificial pancreas and automatically enables patients to achieve more stable glucose levels 24 hours a day.

Led by Carol Levy, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Disease), the Icahn School of Medicine is one of nine U.S. and European sites participating in the research, and sharing a $12.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Levy is one of the study’s lead investigators. Read more

Celebrating Heart Health Month

Celebrating Heart Health Month

Cheyenne Hayward, RN, left, Coronary Care Unit, The Mount Sinai Hospital, checks the blood pressure of visitor Joan Innocent.

More than 775 staff and visitors attended health fairs sponsored by Mount Sinai Heart on Friday, February 5, Go Red for Women Day®, an annual educational event that spotlights the risks of cardiovascular disease. Participants received free screenings for high blood pressure, cholesterol, weight, glucose, and peripheral vascular disease, and learned about nutrition and diet, diabetes, stress management, smoking cessation, and relaxation techniques. Other events included exercise workshops, support group meetings, and educational lectures sponsored by Women’s Heart NY, a comprehensive Mount Sinai Health System heart program.

Learning to Deliver Compassionate Care

Medical student Yotam Arens learns more about the life of patient Juan Sanabria.

Medical student Yotam Arens learns more about the life of patient Juan Sanabria.

Medical students from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai performed special patient rounds on Tuesday, February 16, as part of The Gold Humanism Honor Society’s (GHHS) annual “Solidarity Day for Compassionate Care.” This national program encourages hospital staff and medical school students to develop more caring, compassionate relationships with patients. Twenty students visited 12 patients in The Mount Sinai Hospital Palliative Care Unit and Kravis Children’s Hospital at Mount Sinai, practicing “Tell Me More” interactions. The students conversed with patients about topics unrelated to their diagnoses, developing compassionate communication skills they can use in future patient interactions. Created by GHHS chapter members at the Icahn School of Medicine in 2014, dozens of GHHS chapters nationwide use the “Tell Me More” program.