Cooking Classes Help Cancer Survivors Make Nutrition Changes

When Ann Ogden was first diagnosed with kidney cancer in 2001, she had no idea that creating a cooking network for cancer patients would someday become her great life’s work. Ann was, professionally, a fashion designer, but she found her culinary knowledge to be particularly useful while managing the side effects of treatment for a later diagnosed breast cancer. She would swap recipes with other patients, who found her guidance helpful and encouraged her to do more with her skills. In 2007, Cook for Your Life–a website dedicated to providing healthy recipes, cooking tips and nutrition information to cancer survivors–was born. Read more

Tips for curbing a sugar habit in the New Year

If you think you eat too much sugar, you probably do, and you’re not alone in satisfying your sweet tooth. This infographic illustrates the extent to which Americans overindulge. On average, Americans consume 765 grams sugar, the equivalent of 17 12-ounce sodas every 5 days. Our typical intake is 22 teaspoons of sugar per day, compared to the American Heart Association recommendation of no more than 9.5 teaspoons. Read more

A Life-Saving Treatment for a Triathlete

While competing in a 1,500-meter triathlon swim in the Hudson River in August, Chris LaPak, 52, experienced sudden cardiac arrest. A Herculean rescue effort ensued, with first responders moving him quickly from a surfboard to a jet ski to a boat and finally to a pier. Attempts at cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) failed, leaving Mr. LaPak—the president of a pharmaceutical printing company—without a pulse for at least nine minutes before he was finally resuscitated with an automated-external defibrillator.

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A Leading Breast Cancer Researcher and Clinician Joins Mount Sinai

Charles L. Shapiro, MD, a renowned breast cancer researcher and clinician, has been named Co-Director of the Dubin Breast Center, Director of Translational Breast Cancer Research for the Mount Sinai Health System, and Director of Survivorship Programs at The Tisch Cancer Institute at Mount Sinai.

“As a nationally recognized leader in breast medical oncology and research, Dr. Shapiro will have a pivotal role in advancing breast cancer treatment and care for our patients,” says Elisa Port, MD, Chief of Breast Surgery and Co-Director of the Dubin Breast Center at The Tisch Cancer Institute.

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Learning About Stroke

In Herald Square, on Wednesday, October 29—World Stroke Day—staff from The Mount Sinai Hospital, World Stroke Organization, and Covidien provided free blood pressure screenings, answered questions about stroke, and helped launch a global “Take 2…Tell 2” campaign. “This initiative encourages people to educate themselves and others by taking two minutes to learn about stroke risk factors, warning signs, and symptoms, and spending two minutes sharing that information,” says Stephan A. Mayer, MD, Founding Director, Institute for Critical Care Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Memory Screenings at 92nd Street Y

Experts from Mount Sinai’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center provided free, confidential memory screenings on Tuesday, November 18, National Memory Screening Day, at the 92nd Street Y and at Linkage House, a Mount Sinai-affiliated residence for East Harlem elderly. National Memory Screening Day, spearheaded by the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America, promotes the early detection of memory problems, Alzheimer’s disease, and related illnesses, and encourages appropriate intervention.

Woman to Woman: Supporting Patients Who Have Cervical Cancer

Cervical cancer can be a challenging and isolating ordeal. Mount Sinai provides a program that helps women who are suffering from this disease and allows them to stay positive.

The Woman to Woman program offers mentoring to women undergoing treatment for gynecologic cancer, including cervical cancer, to help them and their families get through this tough time. The program helps empower women to advocate for themselves and offer ongoing emotional support.

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Realistic Resolutions for the New Year

A new year is the perfect time to set goals and make positive changes in our lives. But, if you’re like the majority of us, these good intentions tend to fall by the wayside long before the winter snow starts to melt. This can happen if we set expectations too high or try to make drastic changes – it’s easy to get discouraged this way and abandon our plans. This year, try making smaller, more sustainable changes, which can add up big time over the course of the year! Here are some of our favorites: Read more