Healthy Holiday Nutrition Tips

It’s that time of year again—brisk temperatures, festive décor, holiday parties. While it’s often something we look forward to for months, the time from Thanksgiving to New Years also means being faced with seasonal treats, big meals and fancy cocktails that can make it difficult to maintain a healthy diet. According to recent research, the average American may gain 1-2 pounds this time of year, which can be tough to lose once we put away our party hats and winter sets in. The good news is that keeping up your healthy habits through the holidays and avoiding weight gain doesn’t mean depriving yourself of things you love. Here are our tips for having a happy and healthy holiday season:

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New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai Receives National Recognition for Nursing Excellence

New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai (NYEE) has received national recognition for excellence in nursing for the second consecutive time from the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s (ANCC) Magnet Recognition Program®. Magnet® Recognition designation is considered the highest recognition for nursing excellence, and fewer than 8 percent of hospitals in the United States have received this honor. NYEE is the only eye and ear specialty hospital in the country to have received this recognition.

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New Superhero Debuts at NYEE

Sapheara, a new Marvel Comics superhero with cochlear implants, recently made her debut at an event hosted by the Ear Institute at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai (NYEE). The heroine is featured in a new comic book and teacher’s guide titled Sound Effects, in which she, Iron Man, and Blue Ear—a superhero with hearing aids—unite to protect New York City, while addressing the issues of bullying, and hearing loss awareness and prevention. The event and publications were sponsored by the Children’s Hearing Institute (CHI), an organization that supports medical research at NYEE, and Marvel Custom Solutions. Sound Effects will be distributed to approximately 150,000 New York City public school students in grades three through seven.

“Breakfast of Legends” Honors Supporters

The Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center (MSAHC) honored four individuals and a nonprofit organization for their commitment to the young people of New York City at its eleventh annual “Breakfast of Legends” event held Thursday, October 23, at The Plaza Hotel.

The MSAHC is one of the largest and most comprehensive adolescent health centers in the nation, and provides free medical, mental health, sexual and reproductive health, dental, and optical services to more than 11,000 underserved youth and young adults, ages 10 to 24.

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Tips for Avoiding Eye Infections from Contact Lenses

A new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported millions of Americans may be suffering from keratitis, an infection of the cornea, caused by improper handling of contact lenses. According to the CDC, wearing lenses too long and not cleaning them properly are the most common underlying factors of eye infections in the estimated 38 million Americans who wear contact lenses.

“Bacterial keratitis is usually treated with antibiotic drops and may require multiple return visits to your ophthalmologist,” says Marina Grapp, OD, Director, Specialty Contact Lens Service, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, “But the infection is easily avoidable with proper use.”

During Contact Lens Health Week, Dr. Grapp offers some tips for avoiding contact lens-related eye infections:

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Does a Robotic Cystectomy Offer a Superior Outcome to Open Cystectomy?

Currently, the standard of care worldwide for the treatment of patients who have cancer invading the bladder muscle (muscle invasive bladder cancer) is chemotherapy followed by surgery. In men, the surgery is called radical cystoprostatectomy (removal of the bladder, prostate, and the seminal vesicles). In women, the surgery is called anterior pelvic exentration (removal of bladder, uterus, ovaries, and part of the vagina which can sometimes be avoided). In addition, a critical part of the surgery in both men and women is removing the lymph nodes within the pelvis.

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Hernia Facts and Treatments

Merriam Webster defines a hernia as “a protrusion of an organ or part of an organ (as the intestine) through connective tissue or through a wall of the cavity (as of the abdomen) in which it is normally enclosed.” A ventral hernia arises in the abdominal wall because a weakness or defect in the abdominal muscles causes the intestines and other abdominal contents to push through. The weakness can be congenital, or it may be caused by aging or injury (i.e., surgical incision).

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Fall Allergies Versus a Cold: Tips on How to Tell the Difference

As we head through fall and on toward winter, it’s the time of year when you might start to have the sniffles, sneezing, or a cough. But what is it? Fall allergies? A cold?

Sujan Patel, MD, Assistant Professor of Allergy and Immunology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, says “Many symptoms of the common cold and fall allergies can overlap, leaving patients confused as to the best course of treatment. But there are some simple ways to tell these different conditions apart.”

Dr. Patel shares some tips on how to tell the difference between fall allergies and colds by the most common symptoms of each:

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National Healthy Eating Day

We are pleased to announce the winner of the best employee-submitted heart-healthy recipe in honor of National Healthy Eating Day on Wednesday, November 5.

Mount Sinai Heart, Food and Nutrition Services, and the chefs at The Mount Sinai Hospital have chosen two heart-healthy recipes submitted by Anna Horton, Assistant Director of Communications, Office of Development: Mexican Chopped Salad and Crispy Black Bean Quinoa Burritos.

Here are the winning recipes:

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Five Common Running Mistakes: How to Optimize Your Running Experience

With the New York City Marathon fast approaching this Sunday, many may be inspired to lace up their sneakers and get to running. Running is a great way to get exercise while exploring the city however, below are five of the most common mistakes made by runners.

Improper Shoes

Most novice runners lace up an old pair of sneakers and start to run but, this has many pitfalls. The type of shoe you wear has to be right for your individual foot. It also should not be worn out, as that will change the biomechanics of the shoe/run dynamic. It is best to go to a specialty running store, where a knowledgeable salesperson can evaluate your foot type, and inward foot movement, to see if you are an over-pronator, under-pronator or a neutral runner – each type of foot requires a different shoe type. It is also important to then replace the shoe every 300 miles, or when you can visibly notice wear on the bottom of the shoe.

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