Rosacea: myths, reality and treatment

What is rosacea?

Rosacea is a skin condition in which your face tends to appear red and inflamed with periods of worsening and improvement over months to years. Individuals with rosacea may flush easily or develop what looks like acne breakouts. It can occur in all ages or ethnicities but tends to be most common in white, middle-aged adults.

How common is rosacea?

Rosacea is extremely common with an estimated 14 million Americans suffering from the condition. Some notable sufferers include former President Bill Clinton, J.P. Morgan, W.C. Fields, Rembrandt and Rosie O’Donnell — not to mention Santa Claus and, most likely, Rudolph!

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Evidenced Based Medicine

In my health care management career, medical education has advanced from apprenticeships (“see one, do one, teach one”) to differential diagnosis (The process of weighing the probability of one disease versus that of other diseases possibly accounting for a patient’s illness) to…..Evidenced Based Medicine

“The most common definition of Evidence-Based Practice (EBM) is “the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of the individual patient. It means integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available external clinical evidence from systematic research.”

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Why Don’t Patients Remind Medical Professionals to Wash Their Hands?

I ask this question to every clinician examining me, doing a procedure on me, or drawing blood from me. Physicians. Dentists. Phlebotomists. Radiology techs. PTs.

And I prefer they wash their hands in front of me. Proper hand washing is the single most effective preventive medicine measure.

Recently a Bloomberg News article explained why it is important to remind clinicians to wash their hands. “Physicians shouldn’t take offense. We all can benefit from reminders about the basics. Years of education and expertise don’t mean that medical professionals aren’t human, and may sometimes forget a step in even routine procedures.”

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Don’t Behave Emotionally When Asking for Hand-Washing Compliance

Recently a Fox Business story noted: “When Cari Shane requested that her four-year-old’s pediatrician wash her hands before starting the exam, the doctor complied, but was upset. But Shane, who is a public relations executive, says if she were in the same position, she’d do the same thing all over again. “What was more important? Having the doctor mad at me or protecting the health of my child?”

“Strict hand hygiene is the gold standard for reducing infections associated with health care-associated infections (HAIs), experts say. And when doctors, nurses and health care workers fall short, it’s important for patients to feel confident enough to speak up.”

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Achieving the “Triple Aim”

“—providing the highest quality of care at the lowest cost possible while improving patient outcomes—is becoming more and more difficult…” One strong option to help the medical community achieve these aims is physician-led team-based care.”

A recent AMA Wire story story noted: “In a physician-led team, physicians collaborate with nurse practitioners, physician assistants and other health professionals, supporting team members in performing to the height of their training and building on each professional’s strengths and perspectives. At the 2012 AMA Interim Meeting, a joint report (AMA login required) of the Councils on Medical Education and Medical Service established principles to guide the interactions between physician team leaders and non-physician practitioners. The Councils noted that this care delivery approach can help improve access to care, enhance quality and enable greater continuity of care.”

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Does Your Physician Use an Electronic Medical Record (EMR)?

There are many advantages of electronic medical records. Electronic medical records (EMR) help health care providers better manage patient care by:

  • Getting accurate and complete information about their patient’s health
  • Better coordinating the care they give to their patients and families
  • Securely sharing information with patients electronically about their personal health record
  • Accessing information to help diagnose patients, reducing medical errors, and providing safer care at lower costs
  • An EMR contains patient health information, such as: Administrative and billing data; Patient demographics; Progress notes; Vital signs; Medical histories ; Diagnoses; Medications; Immunization dates; Allergies; Radiology images; Lab and test results

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Plantar Fasciitis: A Primer

With summer now in full swing, many of us will be out running, trying our best at soccer to support the World Cup and gearing up our tennis skills with the French and US Open upon us. But since many of us are not pros, we may succumb to plantar fasciitis.

Plantar fasciitis (PF) is the most common cause of foot pain, and odds are if you’re active in exercise or an athlete, you probably have suffered through it. It’s characterized by inflammation of the tendons and muscles of the foot and calf where they insert on your heel, and is usually burning and sharp in sensation and worst with walking when you wake in the morning. You are at risk if you have flat feet, a leg length discrepancy, stand for long periods of time on hard surfaces, and are overweight.

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Cleft and Craniofacial Myths

July is Cleft and Craniofacial Awareness Month. Here are the most common myths about this disease that I hear from my patients.

Myth:

Children with clefts and craniofacial anomalies do not require specialty care.

Reality:

Patients born with a birth defect involving the head and neck should be seen soon after birth – either in the hospital at the time of delivery or soon after discharge as an outpatient – by a team of expert clinicians from different specialties. In this type of setting, the clinical team can assess what problems exist and how best to improve them.

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Remembering D-Day 70 Years Later

“I thought I would never live to see the end of that day,” said Mount Sinai Beth Israel patient Robert Cohen, recollecting his experience as a young U.S. infantryman landing on Utah Beach on June 6, 1944. Mr. Cohen spent the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landing with Alene, his wife of 66 years, his son Michael, two of his eight grandchildren, and Mount Sinai Beth Israel staff, discussing the events of that day, when he was one of 20,000 Allied troops landing at Utah Beach, the westernmost flank of the Normandy invasion.

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