Kravis Children’s Hospital Ranks Among Nation’s Top Pediatric Centers

Kravis Children’s Hospital at Mount Sinai is nationally ranked in seven out of the ten pediatric specialties measured by U.S. News & World Report in its 2014-15 “Best Children’s Hospital” annual guidebook. Notably, for the first time, Kravis Children’s Hospital is ranked in neurology & neurosurgery, and neonatology.

The seven specialties are diabetes & endocrinology (No. 22), nephrology (No. 29), neurology & neurosurgery (No. 29), pulmonology (No. 30), gastroenterology & GI surgery (No. 40), neonatology (No. 49), and urology (No. 50). To develop the rankings, U.S. News & World Report surveyed 183 pediatric centers to obtain clinical data in each of the 10 specialties measured, and also asked 150 pediatric specialists in each specialty where they would refer their sickest patients.

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Mount Sinai Doctors Among the Best in New York

The Mount Sinai Health System was highly represented in New York magazine’s recently released list of “Best Doctors in New York,” which named 227 physicians from all seven hospitals and 36 doctors from Mount Sinai’s affiliated hospitals. The 263 physicians represented 21 percent of the total 1,251 doctors on New York magazine’s 2014 list, which appeared online and in the June 9-15, 2014 print edition. The list covers physicians from throughout the New York metropolitan region, including Connecticut and New Jersey.

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Erik Lium, PhD, Leads Mount Sinai Innovation Partners

Erik Lium, PhD, an expert in academic-industry partnerships and commercializing early-stage scientific discoveries, has joined the Mount Sinai Health System as Vice President and Executive Director of Mount Sinai Innovation Partners (MSIP). In this role, Dr. Lium leads MSIP’s efforts to foster collaborative partnerships with pharmaceutical, medical device, diagnostic, and information technology companies, and to commercialize Mount Sinai discoveries.

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“The experience showed me U.S. medicine at its capable, caring best …”

Recently a New York Daily News article was a first person story of experience with the health care system.

“My plunge into the world of ambulances, emergency rooms and minor surgery came without warning, like a trapdoor opening beneath my feet. One second, I was skiing along happily in upstate New York’s Adirondack Mountains with my son and a group of friends. The next, I was writhing on the slope in pain — having wrenched my right leg in an awkward, slow-speed fall. In the blink of an eye, I went from a healthy and independent 52-year-old to a trauma victim in need of a lot of expert help from a lot of people.”

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“Would you rather your doctor won the “quality” contest by doing good list management.or spent that time listening to you?”

Recently an article in the Wall Street Journal noted “Quality” has been the buzzword in health care for a decade, but the worthy goal is driving health-care providers to distraction. All stakeholders—insurers, patients, hospital administrators and government watchdogs—are demanding metrics to ensure that money is spent wisely.

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Choosing Wisely: Technology to help you make a list of questions to ask your doctor

To get the most benefit out of a visit to your doctor, you should prepare beforehand! It really pays off to write down your questions in advance. Now there are resources available to help you get ready.

In my campaign to encourage patients to talk openly to their physicians I came across CHOOSING WISELY.

“Choosing Wisely is focused on encouraging physicians, patients and other health care stakeholders to think and talk about medical tests and procedures that may be unnecessary, and in some instances can cause harm.”

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“…You can prevent a medical error by simply asking the right questions”

A recent ivillage.com article offered some advice on what to do and not do to when getting started with a physician.

“The doctor should ask thorough questions but the patient needs to be honest and not withhold information, even if it’s embarrassing or hard to talk about. Know your – and your family’s – medical history and bring in any medications you are taking, even if you think they are unrelated. If the doctor doesn’t have all the information, the likelihood of a misdiagnosis increases.

Don’t be shy: Whether it’s voicing concerns or mentioning tests you’ve read about or asking about drug interactions, patients need to speak up. It’s ok to do your own homework, just don’t get too caught up in self-diagnosing online before your appointment …”

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How to Stay Hydrated during the Summer

It’s summer (finally!), and there’s nothing better than some quality playing-time in beautiful weather. But, with the mercury rising, dehydration is a serious concern whether you’re having a marathon practice session or match, and can affect performance when as little as 2% of your body mass is lost through sweat. Since tennis players can lose more than 2.5 liters of sweat per hour in warm weather, it’s easy to fall behind on your fluid intake if you’re not careful.

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Drug Interactions – Check for yourself & before you go to the doctor?

If you have a really good PCP, she or he will monitor all the prescriptions you take as well as any over-the-counter (OTC) vitamins and supplements you use.

But we have all heard about family members and friends who have been affected by adverse drug interactions.

This may occur because: you go to several physicians who each give you prescriptions; a prescription is changed; you buy and use OTC products; and/or you do not read the warnings on the prescription.

REMINDER: Always bring a list of all your prescriptions and OTC products to every doctor’s visit.

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