GI Medical Oncology Practice Recognized by QOPI Certification Program

Mount Sinai’s Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology practice has been recognized by the Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI®) Certification Program, an affiliate of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).  The QOPI® Certification Program provides a 3-year certification for outpatient hematology-oncology practices that meet the highest standards for quality cancer care.

QOPI certification signifies that an outpatient oncology practice has met core standards in a variety of areas that affect the quality of patient care, including staff training and education, chemotherapy orders and drug preparation, patient consent and education, safe chemotherapy administration, and monitoring and assessment of patient well-being. Mount Sinai is the first site in Manhattan to receive QOPI-certification.

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Convocation 2013 Honors Excellence

Ten faculty members were named endowed professors at the 2013 Convocation Ceremony on Monday, September 30, an event that marks the beginning of the academic year for the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. The honorees, renowned in their respective fields—including allergy and immunology, cancer research, neuroscience, nephrology, otolaryngology, translational genetics, and transplant immunology—comprised the largest group named at one time at Mount Sinai.

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Patient Transfer Center Unites Hospital Campuses

The Emergency Departments at St. Luke’s and Roosevelt Hospitals started transferring pediatric cases to The Mount Sinai Hospital on Tuesday, October 1, a day after the creation of the Mount Sinai Health System. These patient transfers are among the first systemwide synergies to be implemented throughout the seven campuses, and point to the fluidity of the Health System’s Inter-Hospital Transfer Center, which is open seven days a week, 24 hours a day.

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Town Hall Meetings Present Vision for Future

It was standing room only at the campuses of Beth Israel Medical Center, St. Luke’s and Roosevelt Hospitals, and New York Eye and Ear Infirmary for a series of Town Hall meetings at which the leaders of the Mount Sinai Health System presented their vision for the future and how the new system will address today’s health care challenges.

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How to Advance in Movement Disorders Research

In recent years there have been major breakthroughs in the identification of novel molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of brain disorders. For instance, thanks to state-of-the-art molecular techniques, current stem cell research not only allows in-vitro recapitulation of disease expression, but also for the discovery of novel disease-associated cellular mechanisms.

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BOTOX Gains FDA Approval to Treat “Crow’s Feet”

As of September 11th 2013, BOTOX™ Cosmetic (onabotulinumtoxinA) received approval from the FDA for the treatment of lines extending around the corner of the eyes, commonly known as “crow’s feet.” Since its initial FDA approval in 2002, Botox has become incredibly popular for the treatment of facial lines and wrinkles, both on label (glabellar lines – the dreaded “11” seen between the eyebrows) and off-label (all the other lines and wrinkles on your face, including crows feet). Botox, along with its competitors and Dysport™ and Xeomin, are often referred to as “relaxing agents.” Technically, they are paralytic agents produced from sterile derivatives of Botulinum Toxin but most patients prefer not associate Botulism, toxins or paralysis with their face.

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October is National Liver Cancer Awareness Month

Liver cancer may be less well-known than other cancer types, but it is the fifth most common cancer in the world.  And despite progress in other fields, liver cancer is one of the few cancers whose rate in the United States is continuing to rise.  Liver cancer, whose medical term is hepatocellular carcinoma, is tumor that starts in the liver and can spread to other organs if left untreated.

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Making an Old Brain More Plastic

We all know that it is easier to learn a new language or musical instrument as a child rather than in adulthood. At no other time in life does the surrounding environment so potently shape brain function – from basic motor skills and sensation to higher cognitive processes like language – than it does during childhood. This experience-dependent process occurs at distinct time windows called “critical periods”, which are times of great opportunity but also of great vulnerability for the developing brain. Early disruption of proper sensory or social experiences will result in mis-wired circuits that will respond sub-optimally to normal experiences in the future. Comparable effects are also seen for the development of vision, where if a child’s binocular vision is compromised and not corrected before the age of eight, amblyopia (‘lazy eye’) is permanent and irreversible.

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Welcome to the Mount Sinai Health System: A New Era Begins

The Boards of Trustees of The Mount Sinai Medical Center and Continuum Health Partners announced on Monday, September 30, the establishment of the Mount Sinai Health System. This new health system includes Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, seven major member hospital campuses in New York City, an extensive network of approximately 45 ambulatory care locations, 12 free-standing ambulatory surgery centers, and more than 40 clinical and academic relationships with local health care organizations—all throughout the greater metropolitan region.

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