The Real President’s Day

The clipping showing Mount Sinai Hospital nursing student Frances Klepadlo from the New York Daily Mirror, February 1954.

Back in the day, the United States used to mark the birthdays of President Abraham Lincoln  (February 12th) and President George Washington (February 22nd) as two separate events. In fact, it was only Washington’s birth that was celebrated as a federal holiday, starting in 1879, and it was on his actual birth date of the 22nd.  In 1971, it was made a floating holiday, marked on the third Monday of February.  Now the day is most commonly known as Presidents’ Day and is taken to be a combination of George and Abe’s birthday. The newspaper clipping on the left shows a student in the Mount Sinai Hospital School of Nursing 60 years ago reading a book about George Washington to a group of pediatric patients.  The student’s name is Frances Klepadlo, and she was in the Class of 1954.  (The nurse on the far left is also a Mount Sinai graduate, as is evidenced by her distinctive cap.) Ms. Klepadlo recently sent an old operating room nurse’s uniform from her student days to the Mount Sinai Archives to be preserved, along with this clipping.  The timing worked out perfectly for us to share it with you in honor of George Washington’s official birthday.  Happy Birthday, Mr. President!

Mount Sinai Historical Publications Available Online

The Icahn School of Medicine Internet Archive collection page

The Mount Sinai Archives of Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is very happy to announce that 65 volumes of Mount Sinai related publications are now available on the Internet Archive (https://archive.org/details/mountsinaiarchives). These volumes represent 111 separate publications across eight discrete titles and total over 18,000 pages. They were scanned through the support of the Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO.) The bulk of the collection consists of the Annual Reports of The Mount Sinai Hospital and its predecessor organization (until 1866), the Jews’ Hospital in the City of New York. These Reports date from 1856-1956 with some gaps in the early years. The collection also includes the complete five volume set of The Mount Sinai Hospital Reports, 1898-1906, the Report of The Mount Sinai Training School for Nurses from 1881-1911, and the Rules and Regulations for the Government of The Mount Sinai Hospital of the City of New York from 1899-1919. Two previously published histories of The Mount Sinai Hospital are also being made available: The Story of the First Fifty Years of The Mount Sinai Hospital (Mount Sinai Hospital, 1944) and The First Hundred Years of The Mount Sinai Hospital of New York, 1852-1952 by Joseph Hirsh and Beka Doherty (Random House, 1952).

Taken together, these volumes are a wonderful resource for information on the development of hospitals and healthcare during the 19th and early 20th centuries. As such, they have been added to the Medical Heritage Library, a collaborative project that promotes open access to medical history resources. The Annual Reports also provide insight into the Jewish community of New York City during this time, including names and addresses of the Hospital’s supporters.

Our thanks to METRO for their support of this project. Please let us know if you have any questions or need additional information about these or other Mount Sinai records.

New: Bates Visual Guide to Physical Examination

The new edition of Bates’ Visual Guide to Physical Examination is now available through the Levy Library.  The fifth edition provides all new updated videos, completely re-shot since the 4th edition.  This resource has been used for years by our medical students during Art and Science of Medicine, and we are glad to see that it was entirely updated for 2014.  Bates’ includes over 8 hours of video content covering head-to-toe assessment as well as systems-based physical examination techniques.  Access Bates’ through the Library’s databases page, the Required and Suggested Textbooks Page, or directly at Bates’ Visual Guide to Physical Examination.

Welcome to John Graves, Director of Instructional Technology

We recently welcomed John Graves as Director of Instructional Technology in the division of Academic Informatics and Technology.  He is leading a creative team focused on serving students, faculty and researchers within the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.  John is relaunching the instructional technology team and further expanding collaboration, academic media and distance education technologies throughout the School.

John comes to us from Yale University where he led a variety of successful initiatives to improve teaching and learning technologies throughout the institution. Over the past five years he deployed new collaboration technologies to support the Yale School of Nursing’s distance education efforts and most recently launched an extensive network of classroom recording systems within the Yale School of Medicine and the Yale Law School. In launching new campus technologies he has also championed several faculty and student instructional technology support initiatives. John holds a Master of Arts degree from Saint Michael’s College and a Bachelor of Media Studies from Radford University.  Join us in welcoming him to the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai!

 

Retiring: Polly Beam; Welcoming: Rachel Harrison!

Goodbye to Polly Beam: The last day of 2013 is also the last day at the Levy Library for Polly Beam, the Levy Library’s outgoing Manager of Reference and Instruction.  Polly is retiring after 13 dedicated years of managing library reference and instruction services.  Polly always demonstrated a strong commitment to serving the information needs of students, faculty, residents, nurses, and staff.  Polly has been a committed champion of evidence based medicine, instructing users on complex searching techniques and concepts.  Her mastery of the biomedical literature and experience as a nurse, enabled her to make significant contributions to countless research and publication projects.  Polly also led the library’s many instructional initiatives for medical and graduate students.  We are sad to see her go, but are wishing her all the best in her retirement!!

Welcome to Rachel Harrison: While we say good-bye to Polly, we are very pleased to welcome Rachel Harrison, who will serve as the library’s new Manager of Reference and Instruction.  Rachel earned her B.A. summa cum laude from Emory University and her Master of Science in Library and Information Science (MLIS) from the Palmer School of Library and Information Science.  Prior to joining the Levy Library, Rachel spent five years working in the field of electronic resources publishing, first at ARTstor, a non-profit, digital library of images, and next at McGraw-Hill Professional.  At McGraw-Hill, Rachel was the founding member of the User Services Team, a group devoted to supporting both librarians’ and end-users’ use of the Access online medical resources, such as AccessMedicine and AccessSurgery.

After several years working for library vendors, Rachel is thrilled to cross the threshold into working in an academic library.  She hopes to bring the lessons she learned from working with dozens of medical libraries and the cross-institutional perspective this afforded her to help serve the Mount Sinai community.  Please join us in welcoming her to the Levy Library!

 

The Carl A. and Belle O. Morse Conference Room

Many people have attended meetings in the Levy Library conference room, 11-28, but few could tell you whose generosity made that room possible. One reason for this would be that the plaque outside the room was old and easily overlooked. We have now taken steps to correct this. A new plaque has been put in place next to the door to recognize Carl and Belle Morse, who donated the funds to establish that room. Mr. and Mrs. Morse were significant donors that helped with the creation of what is today the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. When offered the choice of a facility that would bear their name into the future, they chose a room in the Levy Library, the academic center of the School. It is only right that we remember their generosity and honor them with a new plaque.

UpToDate Anywhere App

UpToDate has finally added an app for institutional subscribers!  Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai users can now download UpToDate’s free mobile app to access our library subscription to UpToDate off Mount Sinai’s  network.

Why is this Different?  Currently you can login through the library’s website with your email username and password to access UpToDate’s mobile version on your phone or device, wherever you are.  The new app provides a way to bypass the library’s login and is a sleeker interface on your phone than the regular mobile display.  Instead of logging in through the library’s website, you will need to login to the app with your UpToDate username and password.   In order to maintain access to the app, you will need to validate that you are still a member of Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai every 30 days, by logging into your account while on campus.

To Get Started with the App:

If you already have an UpToDate user name and password, getting UpToDate Anywhere rights is easy.  Access UpToDate while on campus.   Log in with your existing credentials and you’ll receive an email informing you that you now have UTD Anywhere rights and instructions on how to download the Mobile App.  The Log In/Register icon is in the top right hand corner.

If you don’t have an UpToDate account:

Access UpToDate while on campus. Register as a new user and create a user name and password. Use the link in the top right corner that says Log In Register. Upon completion of registration process, you will receive an email from UpToDate with instructions on downloading the mobile app.

Once you are registered for UpToDate Anywhere access with a unique user name and password, you can install the UpToDate Mobile App on up to two devices. For a full list of devices currently supported, please visit www.uptodate.com/home/uptodate-mobile-access.

Read more

Estelle Blumberg, RN: A glance at nursing in the past

Estelle Berman Blumberg in the Mount Sinai Hospital School of Nursing Class of 1947 Yearbook

In reviewing a 20 year old issue of a publication called the Mount Sinai Nurse, Archives staff recently came across an article about Estelle Blumberg, RN, a graduate of The Mount Sinai Hospital School of Nursing, Class of 1947.  She came to Mount Sinai as a student in 1944, and the article outlines her experiences as a trainee and then a young graduate nurse on the wards.  Here are some excerpts from that article:

The Mount Sinai Hospital School of Nursing was housed in 5 E. 98th Street….Each morning, students gathered in the assembly hall to sing songs before going on duty. Clad in black shoes and stockings, and wearing plaid uniforms, student nurses were always easy to spot in the hospital.

Ms. Blumberg’s first job upon graduation was assistant charge nurse of a male ward with 41 beds.  Read more

Clinical Key Now Available Through the Levy Library

The Levy Library has recently subscribed to Clinical Key, a new rendition of MDConsult, which is being phased out by the end of 2014.  Clinical Key provides access to over 1,000 core clinical ebooks and 500 ejournals.  You will find all of the well known ebooks from MDConsult in Clinical Key.  Clinical Key provides access to html versions of ebooks with no extra login, however access to the PDF versions requires a free registration and login.  With your login you can also save searches and preferences.  Clinical Key provides a comprehensive search across a large collection of clinical resources covering all medical and surgical specialties, including many core textbooks.   You may access Clinical Key through the library’s databases page or directly at Clinical Key.