Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCS)

Massive Open Online Courses, also known as MOOCS, are high-quality online courses on a variety of topics, open to all.  These are available to members of the Mount Sinai community and the public at no cost.   In addition to the traditional course materials such as videos, readings and problem sets, MOOCs provide interactive user forums that help build a community for students.

Three of the top MOOCs available include the following:

1.)    The Icahn School of Medicine is participating in the Coursera initiative which is very popular and offers certificates in select programs.  View the Coursera courses offered by the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai here.

2.)   Harvard & MIT’s EdX is also a terrific learning resource.

3.)    The KHAN Academy is a very popular initiative and has a finance focus.

If you have any specific questions, please contact John Graves, Director of Instructional Technology.

Known Library Error: Connection Interrupted

For the last two weeks, some library users have experienced an error when trying to connect to library resources from off-campus.  We apologize for this error.   The connection problem has now been resolved on the server side, however once someone has seen the error, they will continue to have the problem until they have cleared all browser history information including cookies, browser cache, saved forms and saved library passwords.  Here are the instructions:

Firefox:

  • Click on History
  • Click on Clear Recent History
  • This pops open a window.
  • Change the dropdown from Last Hour to Everything
  • Expand the Details menu
  • Check ALL of the boxes
  • Click Clear Now
  • Restart the browser

IE:

  • Click on Safety
  • Click on Delete Browsing History
  • Uncheck the Preserve Favorites box
  • Check all boxes
  • Click Delete
  • Restart browser

Chrome:

  • Click on the 3 horizontal lines at the end of the URL bar
  • Click History
  • Click Clear Browsing Data
  • Make sure the dropdown for timeframe says The Beginning of Time
  • Check all the boxes
  • Click Clear Browsing Data

Safari (on a MAC)

  • Click Reset Safari
  • Check all boxes
  • Click Reset
  • Quit out of the browser
  • Restart

We regret the inconvenience this has caused to our users.  Please contact us if you have any questions or problems: http://library.mssm.edu/services/askus.shtml

 

Women As Blood Donors – 1918

Extract from the minutes of the Executive Committee of the Board of Directors of The Mount Sinai Hospital, November 1918

With World War I going on and the Influenza Epidemic of 1918 raging, The Mount Sinai Hospital Board of Trustees found it prudent to agree to the Medical Board’s request to allow women to serve as blood donors. This was a transitional period in transfusion medicine when indirect transfusion existed (what we are familiar with today), but when direct transfusion – donor to recipient, lying side by side – was still being used.  Mount Sinai physicians Lester Unger, MD and Richard Lewisohn, MD made contributions to both methods just a few years before this.  But it was Lewisohn’s citrate method allowing for indirect transfusions that won the day and paved the way for the development of modern blood banking.

Article Metrics: Now in Nature and BMJ

Leading journals Nature and BMJ are now offering an article metrics feature to analyze the social media impact of an article.  Tweets, blog posts, Facebook shares, news stories, Google+ mentions, page views, and citations from articles are all tabulated and displayed for each article in a graph, shown below.

Click on Article Metrics for most Nature or BMJ articles to view this data.  Altmetrics has been defined as the creation and study of new metrics based on the Social Web for analyzing and informing scholarship.  Altmetrics is beginning to be seen as a supplement to peer-review, as online conversations, shares, and bookmarks can be tabulated by the day or week, rather than the slower journal publication cycle.  Read more about altmetrics here.

 

 

The Real President’s Day

The clipping showing Mount Sinai Hospital nursing student Frances Klepadlo from the New York Daily Mirror, February 1954.

Back in the day, the United States used to mark the birthdays of President Abraham Lincoln  (February 12th) and President George Washington (February 22nd) as two separate events. In fact, it was only Washington’s birth that was celebrated as a federal holiday, starting in 1879, and it was on his actual birth date of the 22nd.  In 1971, it was made a floating holiday, marked on the third Monday of February.  Now the day is most commonly known as Presidents’ Day and is taken to be a combination of George and Abe’s birthday. The newspaper clipping on the left shows a student in the Mount Sinai Hospital School of Nursing 60 years ago reading a book about George Washington to a group of pediatric patients.  The student’s name is Frances Klepadlo, and she was in the Class of 1954.  (The nurse on the far left is also a Mount Sinai graduate, as is evidenced by her distinctive cap.) Ms. Klepadlo recently sent an old operating room nurse’s uniform from her student days to the Mount Sinai Archives to be preserved, along with this clipping.  The timing worked out perfectly for us to share it with you in honor of George Washington’s official birthday.  Happy Birthday, Mr. President!

Mount Sinai Historical Publications Available Online

The Icahn School of Medicine Internet Archive collection page

The Mount Sinai Archives of Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is very happy to announce that 65 volumes of Mount Sinai related publications are now available on the Internet Archive (https://archive.org/details/mountsinaiarchives). These volumes represent 111 separate publications across eight discrete titles and total over 18,000 pages. They were scanned through the support of the Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO.) The bulk of the collection consists of the Annual Reports of The Mount Sinai Hospital and its predecessor organization (until 1866), the Jews’ Hospital in the City of New York. These Reports date from 1856-1956 with some gaps in the early years. The collection also includes the complete five volume set of The Mount Sinai Hospital Reports, 1898-1906, the Report of The Mount Sinai Training School for Nurses from 1881-1911, and the Rules and Regulations for the Government of The Mount Sinai Hospital of the City of New York from 1899-1919. Two previously published histories of The Mount Sinai Hospital are also being made available: The Story of the First Fifty Years of The Mount Sinai Hospital (Mount Sinai Hospital, 1944) and The First Hundred Years of The Mount Sinai Hospital of New York, 1852-1952 by Joseph Hirsh and Beka Doherty (Random House, 1952).

Taken together, these volumes are a wonderful resource for information on the development of hospitals and healthcare during the 19th and early 20th centuries. As such, they have been added to the Medical Heritage Library, a collaborative project that promotes open access to medical history resources. The Annual Reports also provide insight into the Jewish community of New York City during this time, including names and addresses of the Hospital’s supporters.

Our thanks to METRO for their support of this project. Please let us know if you have any questions or need additional information about these or other Mount Sinai records.

New: Bates Visual Guide to Physical Examination

The new edition of Bates’ Visual Guide to Physical Examination is now available through the Levy Library.  The fifth edition provides all new updated videos, completely re-shot since the 4th edition.  This resource has been used for years by our medical students during Art and Science of Medicine, and we are glad to see that it was entirely updated for 2014.  Bates’ includes over 8 hours of video content covering head-to-toe assessment as well as systems-based physical examination techniques.  Access Bates’ through the Library’s databases page, the Required and Suggested Textbooks Page, or directly at Bates’ Visual Guide to Physical Examination.

Welcome to John Graves, Director of Instructional Technology

We recently welcomed John Graves as Director of Instructional Technology in the division of Academic Informatics and Technology.  He is leading a creative team focused on serving students, faculty and researchers within the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.  John is relaunching the instructional technology team and further expanding collaboration, academic media and distance education technologies throughout the School.

John comes to us from Yale University where he led a variety of successful initiatives to improve teaching and learning technologies throughout the institution. Over the past five years he deployed new collaboration technologies to support the Yale School of Nursing’s distance education efforts and most recently launched an extensive network of classroom recording systems within the Yale School of Medicine and the Yale Law School. In launching new campus technologies he has also championed several faculty and student instructional technology support initiatives. John holds a Master of Arts degree from Saint Michael’s College and a Bachelor of Media Studies from Radford University.  Join us in welcoming him to the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai!

 

Retiring: Polly Beam; Welcoming: Rachel Harrison!

Goodbye to Polly Beam: The last day of 2013 is also the last day at the Levy Library for Polly Beam, the Levy Library’s outgoing Manager of Reference and Instruction.  Polly is retiring after 13 dedicated years of managing library reference and instruction services.  Polly always demonstrated a strong commitment to serving the information needs of students, faculty, residents, nurses, and staff.  Polly has been a committed champion of evidence based medicine, instructing users on complex searching techniques and concepts.  Her mastery of the biomedical literature and experience as a nurse, enabled her to make significant contributions to countless research and publication projects.  Polly also led the library’s many instructional initiatives for medical and graduate students.  We are sad to see her go, but are wishing her all the best in her retirement!!

Welcome to Rachel Harrison: While we say good-bye to Polly, we are very pleased to welcome Rachel Harrison, who will serve as the library’s new Manager of Reference and Instruction.  Rachel earned her B.A. summa cum laude from Emory University and her Master of Science in Library and Information Science (MLIS) from the Palmer School of Library and Information Science.  Prior to joining the Levy Library, Rachel spent five years working in the field of electronic resources publishing, first at ARTstor, a non-profit, digital library of images, and next at McGraw-Hill Professional.  At McGraw-Hill, Rachel was the founding member of the User Services Team, a group devoted to supporting both librarians’ and end-users’ use of the Access online medical resources, such as AccessMedicine and AccessSurgery.

After several years working for library vendors, Rachel is thrilled to cross the threshold into working in an academic library.  She hopes to bring the lessons she learned from working with dozens of medical libraries and the cross-institutional perspective this afforded her to help serve the Mount Sinai community.  Please join us in welcoming her to the Levy Library!