The Levy Library’s Interlibrary Loan service (ILLiad) will be unavailable tomorrow (12.10.2014) from 11am-1pm due to a system upgrade. Updating to the latest version of ILLiad (8.5) means will be able to process your requests faster and more efficiently.

If you’ve never used our Interlibrary Loan service, there’s no better time to start! Did you know that if you want access to an electronic journal article that Levy Library doesn’t have available, we can usually order if for you through interlibrary loan? For more information, check out our ILL information page.

Genetic and Genomic Workshop Series: From Big Data to Clinical Application

Medical practice is rapidly moving towards a new era of Personalized Medicine. Thanks to advanced genomic technology and analyses, creating customized, personal treatment plans is no longer just a dream—it’s quickly becoming a reality. If you are interested in how the fundamentals of personalized medicine, what is going on in this area at Mount Sinai and what research resources are available to you, please join us for this workshop series presented by the faculty in Genetics and Genomics Science Department of Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

 

>>>Phenotype to Genotype

Date: Tuesday, December 2, 1-2 PM
Location: Levy Library Large Classroom (A11-41)
Instructor: Dr. Amy Yang, Genetics and Genomic Sciences
Registration: Registration is not required.

Your patient has symptoms that you suspect may be related to a genetic disorder. In this workshop, you will practice using the OMIM, UCSC Genome Browser, HGMD, Gene Tests, GTR, and disease-specific mutational databases to identify the genetic variations that may be causing the symptoms, and the tests needed to confirm your diagnosis.

 

>>>Genotype to Phenotype

Date: Tuesday, December 9, 1-2 PM
Location: Levy Library Large Classroom (A 11-41)
Instructors: Dr. George Diaz, Dr. Michael Linderman, Genetics and Genomic Sciences
Registration: Registration is not required.

The results of the genome sequencing you ordered are in, but how do you analyze and interpret the results? Which variations have known phenotype and disease associations? What are the implications for your patient? We will use the HGMD and dbSNP databases along with the UCSC Genome Browser to identify and analyze variants found in two clinical cases.

 

>>>Personalized Medicine and Pharmacogenomics: The Future is Now

Date: Tuesday, December 16, 1-2 PM
Location: Levy Library Small Classroom (A 11-40)
Instructors: Dr. Noura Abul-Husn, Genetics and Genomic Sciences
Registration: Registration is not required.

Until now, the routine use of genomic information was beyond most health-care providers’ formal training. But, decision support tools are coming online soon that will make personalized medicine a reality. In this session you will be able to use your own genotype or an anonymous sequence and the PharmGKB database to personalize a medication dosage.

 

Any questions? Contact Lili K. Wang:

Lili Wang, MS
Health Science Librarian
Information and Education Services
The Levy Library, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Email: lili.k.wang@mssm.edu
Phone: 212-241-6586

Feeling stressed?

Come meet Alice! In partnership with Therapy Dogs International, Levy Library is pleased to present a visit from Alice, a certified therapy dog. Alice will be accompanied by her handlers, Leslie & John. Alice is a four year old Pomeranian and recently helped over 100 students at Columbia University relax.

Alice is an ASPCA rescue and does special events for them with children and families at the “A” and with children at New York Public Library branches, where she shows children what an rescue dog can be. She also delights them with tricks, including her specialty, a “high 4” and a “low 4.”

Alice will be visiting on Tuesday, November 25th from 11am-1pm on the 10th floor of the Library. Alice may also stop by the Annenberg Student Lounge to say hello.

Academic IT Support Center closing early tonight

The Academic IT Support Center (ASCIT) will be closing at 7pm tonight due to scheduled network maintenance.

Did you know that the Academic IT Support Center supports Mount Sinai Health System students, faculty and staff in a variety of ways, including assisting with hardware & software issues? You can visit them in person at the Levy Library on the 11th floor of the Annenberg Building, Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm; Saturday from 9:00 am-5:00 pm and Sunday from noon to 8:00 pm. You can also email ASCIT@mssm.edu, or call ASCIT at 212-241-7091.

“What is records management?”

I hear that a lot when I tell people that I’m the Records Manager here at Mount Sinai. And I will admit it is a fair question.

One fact that I can point out is that everyone has records that they manage. A very common example would be credit card bills. Whether you get an envelope in your mailbox or an email, every month you receive a statement telling you what you’ve charged and how much you need to pay. These statements are records. After paying the bank or American Express or the credit union, some people will save the statements, while others will delete or throw them away. That decision is a records management decision.

Mount Sinai creates or receives an enormous number of records every day, many with specific legal and regulatory requirements that must be met. One of the jobs of records management is to make sure that we keep these records long enough to meet these obligations. This is called setting retention periods and it is, in some ways, the simple part; most people like to hang on to their stuff.

The more difficult part is getting people to destroy records once their retention period is over. A few records do have long-term value; others are simply sent to storage and forgotten. Part of my job here is identifying those records that we no longer need to keep and convincing those responsible that it is okay destroy them. Since the expense of keeping records longer than necessary, in whatever format, is not trivial, this is important.

These two things are part of how Records Management helps Mount Sinai to actively manage our records. It sounds a lot like a parent trying to get a child to keep his or her room neat. It often feels like that but without the childish temper tantrums or teenage surliness. This is a serious business after all.

- Andrew Shultz, Records Manager

Celebrating American Archives Month

October is American Archives Month, when archivists around the country try to explain to the public just what it is that we do and why it matters. Most people probably have the vague sense that archives preserve information about the past so that history, individual rights and responsibilities can be defined and protected. But what does that actually mean to real people?

This past year, the Mount Sinai Archives has answered over 300 requests for information from the Mount Sinai community and interested outsiders. As part of that we have:

  • provided documents proving that a father’s military service was spent abroad so that his proud daughter could join the Veterans of Foreign Wars;
  • helped children/grandchildren/family members learn more about a loved one, now gone, who attended the Mount Sinai Hospital School of Nursing as a young woman;
  • provided documents to various Mount Sinai departments to support them in their everyday activities, from report creation to lawsuits;
  • supplied information and images to scholars and authors from around the world as they wrote articles, books and blog posts;
  • sat with an actress to talk about her role as a nurse in 1900, showing her documents, notebooks and uniforms to give her a sense of what it would have felt like to be a nurse then, her duties and her training.

We have helped real people touch a piece of the past and that has made an impact on their lives. Not a bad way to spend your day.

Access to Library Resources Reduced: 9/18 from 7am-9am:

On Thursday, September 18th, 2014 from 7:00am – 9:00am, the Levy Library’s proxy server will be down for scheduled maintenance.

* During this time, there will be NO off-campus access to Levy Library resources.
* In addition, the resource links listed on the Library’s website will be invalid and will not provide on-campus access.

Access to select key resources will be available on the Mount Sinai Hospital/School campus by using the following website: http://libguides.mssm.edu/proxy_maintenance

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact a librarian at Refdesk@mssm.edu or (212) 241-7793.

Howard Lilienthal and the Creation of Modern Thoracic Surgery

A portrait of Howard Lilienthal, MD done by Frank Netter, MD. Netter served in a Mount Sinai surgical clinic in the early 1930s.

This year marks the centennial of the creation of the Thoracic Surgery Service at The Mount Sinai Hospital, today’s Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery. Howard Lilienthal, MD was the first Chief of the Division and was a pioneer in the field. Later that same year (1914), he performed the first successful pulmonary lobectomy for inflammatory disease of the lung in the United States.  Much of his surgical work was made possible by the 1910 development by Charles Elsberg, a fellow surgeon at Mount Sinai, of a successful method of endotrachial anesthesia, allowing for open chest surgery.

Howard Lilienthal lived from 1861-1946.  Over his long career, he developed seven instruments and devices (a bullet probe and forceps, a portable operating table, a rib spreader, etc.), pioneered new operations, wrote many articles, and served in a variety of roles in various professional groups.  He was President of the New York County Medical Society as well as both the New York and the American Society for Thoracic Surgery, and a founder of what became the American Cancer Society.  In 1925 he published a two volume work on Thoracic Surgery, the first such textbook in this country; it was an instant classic.  Lilienthal was an officer in World War I, serving with Mount Sinai’s Base Hospital No.3 in France, as well as being placed in other hospitals that needed his expertise.  He was cited for a Distinguished Service Medal, but it never arrived. His only son, Howard Jr., died in 1918 while serving with a British regiment.

Lilienthal has been described as “elegant and aristocratic, very much in keeping with the Mt. Sinai tradition” of his time. He enjoyed fly fishing and painting, and when his failing eyesight ended his artist’s career, he wrote short stories for children. When he died in 1946, Mount Sinai mourned the loss of one of their best and most beloved surgeons.

 

Library Access For Faculty and Housestaff of Icahn School of Medicine

As of July 1st, 2014 faculty and housestaff with Icahn School of Medicine appointments at all sites across the Mount Sinai Health System (Beth Israel, St. Luke’s, Roosevelt, and New York Eye and Ear Infirmary) have access to the Levy Library’s online resources.

To Login:

Go to the Levy Library’s Website and select the e-journal, database, or e-book that you wish to use.  You will then be prompted to login.  Use your Mount Sinai network credentials OR your chpnet OR NYEEI ID and password.

For Help with Your Levy Library Login: 

  • BI and SLR: Contact CareTech at (212) 523-6486
  • NYEE: Contact the Help Desk at (212) 979-4273
  • Mount Sinai Hospital: Contact Academic Support Center at (212) 241-7091 or via email at: ASCIT@mssm.edu

Non-Faculty and Non-Resident Staff can access a core library collection that has been licensed for all staff at Mount Sinai Health System hospitals.  Local hospital librarians can also advise what other resources are available to you at your site.

All members of the Mount Sinai Health System are welcome to visit the Levy Library and use resources in-house.  Please bring your valid ID badge from a Mount Sinai Health System hospital.

For more information on Library Access, please see here.

Annenberg Building Dedicated 40 Years Ago This May

Vice President Gerald R. Ford and Walter Annenberg at the dedication of the Annenberg Building, May 26, 1974

On May 26, 1974, Vice President Gerald R. Ford was the principal speaker at the dedication of Annenberg Building, the home of the then new Mount Sinai School of Medicine. This celebration marked the culmination of two decades of work by Mount Sinai trustees and staff to raise the $152 million necessary to hire the faculty, create the curriculum, build the needed facilities and then find students willing to come to a new school with new ideas on medical education. The building was named for the Annenberg family because the eight children of Mrs. Moses (Sadie) Annenberg were early supporters of the fund raising campaign that created the School. The building was built to house the School of Medicine, but ultimately also had important spaces for The Mount Sinai Hospital, as well.

When the Annenberg Building opened, it had all the latest in technology, including ‘playback equipment for taped teaching aids’ and overhead closed circuit televisions. The Hospital side boasted a “computerized drug profile” for each patient and an automated medical record retrieval system. The radiology equipment was the latest, including a new ultrasound machine capable of displaying the anatomy of heart valves.

In his address, Ford said (as quoted in the NY Times), “I believe that cooperation and compromise are the only means by which our form of government – in this field and others – can move ahead successfully.” He had “hope and belief” that a national health insurance program would be enacted later in 1974.

In less than three months, Gerald Ford became President of the United States when Richard Nixon resigned. He had not mentioned Nixon’s name in his speech at Mount Sinai.