Howard Lilienthal and the Creation of Modern Thoracic Surgery

A portrait of Howard Lilienthal, MD done by Frank Netter, MD. Netter served in a Mount Sinai surgical clinic in the early 1930s.

This year marks the centennial of the creation of the Thoracic Surgery Service at The Mount Sinai Hospital, today’s Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery. Howard Lilienthal, MD was the first Chief of the Division and was a pioneer in the field. Later that same year (1914), he performed the first successful pulmonary lobectomy for inflammatory disease of the lung in the United States.  Much of his surgical work was made possible by the 1910 development by Charles Elsberg, a fellow surgeon at Mount Sinai, of a successful method of endotrachial anesthesia, allowing for open chest surgery.

Howard Lilienthal lived from 1861-1946.  Over his long career, he developed seven instruments and devices (a bullet probe and forceps, a portable operating table, a rib spreader, etc.), pioneered new operations, wrote many articles, and served in a variety of roles in various professional groups.  He was President of the New York County Medical Society as well as both the New York and the American Society for Thoracic Surgery, and a founder of what became the American Cancer Society.  In 1925 he published a two volume work on Thoracic Surgery, the first such textbook in this country; it was an instant classic.  Lilienthal was an officer in World War I, serving with Mount Sinai’s Base Hospital No.3 in France, as well as being placed in other hospitals that needed his expertise.  He was cited for a Distinguished Service Medal, but it never arrived. His only son, Howard Jr., died in 1918 while serving with a British regiment.

Lilienthal has been described as “elegant and aristocratic, very much in keeping with the Mt. Sinai tradition” of his time. He enjoyed fly fishing and painting, and when his failing eyesight ended his artist’s career, he wrote short stories for children. When he died in 1946, Mount Sinai mourned the loss of one of their best and most beloved surgeons.

 

Annenberg Building Dedicated 40 Years Ago This May

Vice President Gerald R. Ford and Walter Annenberg at the dedication of the Annenberg Building, May 26, 1974

On May 26, 1974, Vice President Gerald R. Ford was the principal speaker at the dedication of Annenberg Building, the home of the then new Mount Sinai School of Medicine. This celebration marked the culmination of two decades of work by Mount Sinai trustees and staff to raise the $152 million necessary to hire the faculty, create the curriculum, build the needed facilities and then find students willing to come to a new school with new ideas on medical education. The building was named for the Annenberg family because the eight children of Mrs. Moses (Sadie) Annenberg were early supporters of the fund raising campaign that created the School. The building was built to house the School of Medicine, but ultimately also had important spaces for The Mount Sinai Hospital, as well.

When the Annenberg Building opened, it had all the latest in technology, including ‘playback equipment for taped teaching aids’ and overhead closed circuit televisions. The Hospital side boasted a “computerized drug profile” for each patient and an automated medical record retrieval system. The radiology equipment was the latest, including a new ultrasound machine capable of displaying the anatomy of heart valves.

In his address, Ford said (as quoted in the NY Times), “I believe that cooperation and compromise are the only means by which our form of government – in this field and others – can move ahead successfully.” He had “hope and belief” that a national health insurance program would be enacted later in 1974.

In less than three months, Gerald Ford became President of the United States when Richard Nixon resigned. He had not mentioned Nixon’s name in his speech at Mount Sinai.

Mount Sinai in the First World War

A detail from a display case showing the dog-tags that belonged to Charles F. Naumberg. He is in the picture to the left.

This summer marks the centennial of the beginning of the First World War, sparked in June 1914 by the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.

When the United States entered the war in 1917, the U.S. Army called on American hospitals to enlist their doctors and nurses to serve the war effort. Members of the Mount Sinai staff were organized as U.S. Army Base Hospital No. 3 and stationed at Vauclaire, a fourteenth-century monastery in southern France that had been converted to a hospital.

Two of the display cases highlight Mount Sinai’s Base Hospital No. 3. The third case features pages from a scrapbook created by Marion Moxham, RN, a graduate of the Mount Sinai Training School for Nurses. She started at Base Hospital No. 3 and was then transferred to units in Germany. Her scrapbook provides a fascinating look at life in the Army medical services during World War I.

A page from the Moxham scrapbook. Note the memo from the Chief Nurse top left: “Nurses are not allowed to dance outside of their own hospital”.

This exhibit of material from the Mount Sinai Archives demonstrates how the hospital responded to one of the twentieth century’s first major crises. Twenty-five years later, with the outbreak of the Second World War, the government would once again ask The Mount Sinai Hospital to form and support an Army unit.

Women As Blood Donors – 1918

Extract from the minutes of the Executive Committee of the Board of Directors of The Mount Sinai Hospital, November 1918

With World War I going on and the Influenza Epidemic of 1918 raging, The Mount Sinai Hospital Board of Trustees found it prudent to agree to the Medical Board’s request to allow women to serve as blood donors. This was a transitional period in transfusion medicine when indirect transfusion existed (what we are familiar with today), but when direct transfusion – donor to recipient, lying side by side – was still being used.  Mount Sinai physicians Lester Unger, MD and Richard Lewisohn, MD made contributions to both methods just a few years before this.  But it was Lewisohn’s citrate method allowing for indirect transfusions that won the day and paved the way for the development of modern blood banking.

Mount Sinai Historical Publications Available Online

The Icahn School of Medicine Internet Archive collection page

The Mount Sinai Archives of Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is very happy to announce that 65 volumes of Mount Sinai related publications are now available on the Internet Archive (https://archive.org/details/mountsinaiarchives). These volumes represent 111 separate publications across eight discrete titles and total over 18,000 pages. They were scanned through the support of the Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO.) The bulk of the collection consists of the Annual Reports of The Mount Sinai Hospital and its predecessor organization (until 1866), the Jews’ Hospital in the City of New York. These Reports date from 1856-1956 with some gaps in the early years. The collection also includes the complete five volume set of The Mount Sinai Hospital Reports, 1898-1906, the Report of The Mount Sinai Training School for Nurses from 1881-1911, and the Rules and Regulations for the Government of The Mount Sinai Hospital of the City of New York from 1899-1919. Two previously published histories of The Mount Sinai Hospital are also being made available: The Story of the First Fifty Years of The Mount Sinai Hospital (Mount Sinai Hospital, 1944) and The First Hundred Years of The Mount Sinai Hospital of New York, 1852-1952 by Joseph Hirsh and Beka Doherty (Random House, 1952).

Taken together, these volumes are a wonderful resource for information on the development of hospitals and healthcare during the 19th and early 20th centuries. As such, they have been added to the Medical Heritage Library, a collaborative project that promotes open access to medical history resources. The Annual Reports also provide insight into the Jewish community of New York City during this time, including names and addresses of the Hospital’s supporters.

Our thanks to METRO for their support of this project. Please let us know if you have any questions or need additional information about these or other Mount Sinai records.

The Carl A. and Belle O. Morse Conference Room

Many people have attended meetings in the Levy Library conference room, 11-28, but few could tell you whose generosity made that room possible. One reason for this would be that the plaque outside the room was old and easily overlooked. We have now taken steps to correct this. A new plaque has been put in place next to the door to recognize Carl and Belle Morse, who donated the funds to establish that room. Mr. and Mrs. Morse were significant donors that helped with the creation of what is today the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. When offered the choice of a facility that would bear their name into the future, they chose a room in the Levy Library, the academic center of the School. It is only right that we remember their generosity and honor them with a new plaque.

Estelle Blumberg, RN: A glance at nursing in the past

Estelle Berman Blumberg in the Mount Sinai Hospital School of Nursing Class of 1947 Yearbook

In reviewing a 20 year old issue of a publication called the Mount Sinai Nurse, Archives staff recently came across an article about Estelle Blumberg, RN, a graduate of The Mount Sinai Hospital School of Nursing, Class of 1947.  She came to Mount Sinai as a student in 1944, and the article outlines her experiences as a trainee and then a young graduate nurse on the wards.  Here are some excerpts from that article:

The Mount Sinai Hospital School of Nursing was housed in 5 E. 98th Street….Each morning, students gathered in the assembly hall to sing songs before going on duty. Clad in black shoes and stockings, and wearing plaid uniforms, student nurses were always easy to spot in the hospital.

Ms. Blumberg’s first job upon graduation was assistant charge nurse of a male ward with 41 beds.  Read more

From the Archives: I.C. Rubin’s Nobel Prize Nomination

This week, the Swedish Academy announced the 2013 winners of the Nobel Prize in Medicine.
You may be familiar with the story of Dr. Rosalyn Yalow,
Mount Sinai’s first Nobel laureate, but she is not the only Mount Sinai doctor
to have been nominated for this most distinguished of awards.

In 1935, Dr. Ira Kaplan, a prominent radiologist at New
York’s Bellevue Hospital, was approached by the Nobel Committee to nominate a
candidate for the Prize. He chose Mount Sinai’s I.C. Rubin, a pioneering
gynecologist whose development of the Rubin insufflation test was a major
breakthrough in the diagnosis and treatment of infertility.

Read more

The Archives Has NOT Moved – But Our Door Has!

The Mount Sinai Archives has a new door!  Not new space; not a new location; just a new, temporary door.  Due to the construction on the 10th floor of the Levy Library, the Archives has had to temporarily close its front door.  Our new door opens into the east corridor of the Annenberg 10th floor and has a fancy, paper sign.

Archives door 1

Read more

From the Archives: The Travels of Dr. Hans Popper

The Mount Sinai Archives is at work processing the papers
of Dr. Hans Popper (1903-1988) so that they can be made available to
researchers. Totaling over 33 linear feet, this collection documents the career
of an extraordinarily accomplished doctor who was a founding father of modern
hepatology and one of the driving forces behind the creation of Mount Sinai
School of Medicine.  Read more