Levy Library and ASC-IT hours – NYC Blizzard

Due to the expected storm and blizzard conditions within the New York area, the Levy Library located in ANB 11, will close today at 5:00 PM. Depending on weather conditions, the Library hopes to be open on Tuesday, January 27th from noon-8:00PM. Member hospital library locations at Beth Israel, NYEE, St Luke’s and Roosevelt will be closed Tuesday, January 27th, 2015.

Library resources may be accessed at our website 24/7 at:

http://library.mssm.edu

Library reference services will be available by email at Refdesk@mssm.edu

The Academic IT Support Center (ASC-IT) service desk within ANB 11 will be closed Tuesday, January 27th, 2015 agents will be available by email (ascit@mssm.edu) during our regular hours of 8:00 AM-8:00 PM.

We will provide a status update tomorrow morning regarding our services.

Stay safe and warm!

Tail Tuesdays

In order to promote wellness and stress reduction, Levy Library will host a visit from a certified therapy dog on the second Tuesday of every month.

The next visit will be with Tazzy (Good Dogs International) on Tuesday, February 11th from 12pm-1pm on the 10th floor of the Levy Library. Come on by and say hi, all members of the Mount Sinai community are welcome.

Tazzy wants to meet you!

Mount Sinai Hires a Dean – or Three

Fifty years ago this month, on January 8-9, 1965, the proposed Mount Sinai School of Medicine had its first LCME survey visit. A group was sent to judge whether The Mount Sinai Hospital could successfully create and maintain a medical school. If the surveyors were favorably impressed, they would send a letter of support to the U.S Commissioner of Education expressing their reasonable assurance of success, and the School would then be eligible to receive matching federal funds to help build the new school. Mount Sinai had already submitted a grant for $26 million and so this visit was incredibly important.

The leaders of Mount Sinai thought it would demonstrate their commitment to the School project if they could have a Dean in place by the time of the visit. The Dean Selection Committee had been interviewing several candidates, and in December decided that they would ask Irving Schwartz, MD, to become Dean at Mount Sinai. Dr. Schwartz was then Professor and Chairman of the Department of Physiology at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. The negotiations were opened right before the LCME visit and Dr. Schwartz was introduced to the surveyors as “almost definitely” the first Dean of the young School. The visit went well, and the surveyors were very impressed with Mount Sinai’s efforts. The Summary and Conclusions of their report include these observations:

- The Mount Sinai Hospital is an almost unique institution because of its long traditions of academic pursuits, its unusually capable clinical faculty, its extensive research activity in basic fields, and the strong support it receives from the Jewish community.

- Throughout the institution one can sense an aura of over-all competence, a devotion to academic pursuits, and a soundness of educational philosophy which auger well for the future of the school.

When the official report was received late in February, it had already been decided that Dr. Schwartz would not be the Dean of the entire Medical School, but would instead serve as Dean of the Graduate School of Biological Sciences, as well as Chairman of the Department of Physiology. The Dean Selection Committee went back to work, and by June had received the commitment of George James, MD to be the Dean of Mount Sinai School of Medicine, as well as the CEO of what would become The Mount Sinai Medical Center. On November 30, 1965, Mount Sinai held an investiture ceremony to install the first three official Deans of the new School: George James, MD as Dean of the School of Medicine, Irving Schwartz, MD as Dean of the Graduate School, and Hans Popper, MD, PhD, as Dean for Academic Affairs. (Dr. Popper had long been on Mount Sinai’s staff and was a leader in the effort to create a school.)

In 1967, after repeated submissions and revisions, Mount Sinai received its grant for $26 million, the largest such grant ever given by the government at the time.

The Mount Sinai Hospital News announces the investiture of the three Deans, December 1965

From The Archives: 3rd General Hospital Records Now Online

by Ramona Tirado
Mount Sinai Archives intern, Fall 2014

3rd General Hospital

The Mount Sinai Archives is proud to announce that the records of the U.S. Army 3rd General Hospital, Mount Sinai’s overseas unit during World War II, have been scanned and are now available to the public. This is the first Mount Sinai historical collection to be fully digitized and made freely accessible.

Establishing and maintaining a military hospital was a major undertaking that greatly taxed Mount Sinai’s financial and human resources. In total, Mount Sinai’s contribution to the war included 421 doctors, 216 nurses, 158 employees and 7 trustees, many of whom served as part of the 3rd General Hospital unit. The unit was established in August 1942 and trained at Camp Rucker in Alabama. They were sent overseas in May 1943, spending a year in Tunisia before following the Allied offensive into Italy and France. The unit was formally deactivated in September 1945.

The documents included in the 3rd General Hospital Collection span approximately 20 inches. The collection includes an unpublished unit history written by Dr. Ralph Moloshok, who meticulously detailed his experiences in the war from the arrival of the August 22, 1942 telegram announcing deployment orders to the unit’s official deactivation on September 16, 1945. The manuscript includes details of the officers’ training schedules, education, recreation, and travel. Photographs of their time in basic training at Camp Rucker, as well as their travels to North Africa, are affixed within its pages, and the manuscript also contains hand drawn illustrations by an unidentified artist. Also of note are two scrapbooks from the Department of Nursing and the Nursing Alumnae Association. These scrapbooks contain memorabilia and official documents associated with the Mount Sinai members of the Army Nurse Corps’ participation in World War II. They cover the time period from 1942 through 1945. The collection also contains a complete run of Grand Rounds: Memos from Mount Sinai Men to their Fellows in the Services, a newsletter that collected the correspondence of Mount Sinai’s overseas units for readers on the home front and abroad. Finally, of special note are the digital copies of 8mm films that were created by Dr. Henry Horn, a member of the Unit.  These are available for viewing on-site at the Archives.

A finding aid for the collection is available here. Scanned items can be viewed in the Mount Sinai Digital Repository.

Cover of the 3rd General Hospital Unit History

The Levy Library’s Interlibrary Loan service (ILLiad) will be unavailable tomorrow (12.10.2014) from 11am-1pm due to a system upgrade. Updating to the latest version of ILLiad (8.5) means will be able to process your requests faster and more efficiently.

If you’ve never used our Interlibrary Loan service, there’s no better time to start! Did you know that if you want access to an electronic journal article that Levy Library doesn’t have available, we can usually order if for you through interlibrary loan? For more information, check out our ILL information page.

Genetic and Genomic Workshop Series: From Big Data to Clinical Application

Medical practice is rapidly moving towards a new era of Personalized Medicine. Thanks to advanced genomic technology and analyses, creating customized, personal treatment plans is no longer just a dream—it’s quickly becoming a reality. If you are interested in how the fundamentals of personalized medicine, what is going on in this area at Mount Sinai and what research resources are available to you, please join us for this workshop series presented by the faculty in Genetics and Genomics Science Department of Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

 

>>>Phenotype to Genotype

Date: Tuesday, December 2, 1-2 PM
Location: Levy Library Large Classroom (A11-41)
Instructor: Dr. Amy Yang, Genetics and Genomic Sciences
Registration: Registration is not required.

Your patient has symptoms that you suspect may be related to a genetic disorder. In this workshop, you will practice using the OMIM, UCSC Genome Browser, HGMD, Gene Tests, GTR, and disease-specific mutational databases to identify the genetic variations that may be causing the symptoms, and the tests needed to confirm your diagnosis.

 

>>>Genotype to Phenotype

Date: Tuesday, December 9, 1-2 PM
Location: Levy Library Large Classroom (A 11-41)
Instructors: Dr. George Diaz, Dr. Michael Linderman, Genetics and Genomic Sciences
Registration: Registration is not required.

The results of the genome sequencing you ordered are in, but how do you analyze and interpret the results? Which variations have known phenotype and disease associations? What are the implications for your patient? We will use the HGMD and dbSNP databases along with the UCSC Genome Browser to identify and analyze variants found in two clinical cases.

 

>>>Personalized Medicine and Pharmacogenomics: The Future is Now

Date: Tuesday, December 16, 1-2 PM
Location: Levy Library Small Classroom (A 11-40)
Instructors: Dr. Noura Abul-Husn, Genetics and Genomic Sciences
Registration: Registration is not required.

Until now, the routine use of genomic information was beyond most health-care providers’ formal training. But, decision support tools are coming online soon that will make personalized medicine a reality. In this session you will be able to use your own genotype or an anonymous sequence and the PharmGKB database to personalize a medication dosage.

 

Any questions? Contact Lili K. Wang:

Lili Wang, MS
Health Science Librarian
Information and Education Services
The Levy Library, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Email: lili.k.wang@mssm.edu
Phone: 212-241-6586

Feeling stressed?

Come meet Alice! In partnership with Therapy Dogs International, Levy Library is pleased to present a visit from Alice, a certified therapy dog. Alice will be accompanied by her handlers, Leslie & John. Alice is a four year old Pomeranian and recently helped over 100 students at Columbia University relax.

Alice is an ASPCA rescue and does special events for them with children and families at the “A” and with children at New York Public Library branches, where she shows children what an rescue dog can be. She also delights them with tricks, including her specialty, a “high 4” and a “low 4.”

Alice will be visiting on Tuesday, November 25th from 11am-1pm on the 10th floor of the Library. Alice may also stop by the Annenberg Student Lounge to say hello.

the logo of the 3rd General Hospital

Nursing’s Military Legacy: Isabelle V. Cedar Cook (November 1918 – July 2013)

by Ramona Tirado
Mount Sinai Archives intern, Fall 2014

Veteran’s Day is celebrated as an opportunity to reexamine past conflicts and acknowledge the men and women who have risked everything in a fight for their nations, their people and their beliefs. Military leaders recognize the great value of having clinicians available to attend those who have been wounded in battle and many Mount Sinai physicians and nurses have contributed their specialized skills in military service during wartime.

Mount Sinai’s Archives and Records Management division has among its holdings collections of documents detailing service of The Mount Sinai doctors and nurses in World War II. This Veteran’s Day, we would like to highlight one such nurse who represented the United States and The Mount Sinai Hospital in that war, Isabelle Cedar Cook.

Isabelle Cedar had just graduated from The Mount Sinai Hospital School of Nursing in 1940 when the U.S. Surgeon General proposed that Mount Sinai establish a 1000 bed hospital to treat soldiers overseas who had been wounded in the war. When the call was made for nurses to volunteer, Cook felt moved to action and enlisted to do what she felt was her duty to her nation. Cook was accepted into the Army Nurse Corps as part of Mount Sinai’s 3rd General Hospital unit, and in 1942 she reported for basic training at Camp Rucker in Alabama.

In May 1943 Cook traveled from Alabama to Casablanca, Morocco, where she and the rest of the unit awaited orders to report to the 3rd General’s site in Tunisia. Cook arrived in Tunisia as part an advance team that included 10 nurses. Upon their arrival, the nurses took over the French army barracks that the Germans had used as a hospital. The nurses were surprised to find the barracks still occupied by severely wounded Germans and a single doctor, all of whom had been left behind when the fighting ended. The nurses assumed the responsibility of caring for the wounded, and the doctor and all of the German soldiers became prisoners of war.

Over the next three years, the 3rd General Hospital would follow the front into Italy and then France. Cook celebrated the end of the war by marching in the VE (Victory in Europe) Day parade in Aix-en-Provence, France alongside Allied soldiers. The order came to close down the 3rd General in August 1945. She received her formal discharge in December 1945 having earned the rank of First Lieutenant.

In 1999, she published a book describing her experiences in the war. The book is titled In Times of War: Memoirs of a World War II Nurse.

Academic IT Support Center closing early tonight

The Academic IT Support Center (ASCIT) will be closing at 7pm tonight due to scheduled network maintenance.

Did you know that the Academic IT Support Center supports Mount Sinai Health System students, faculty and staff in a variety of ways, including assisting with hardware & software issues? You can visit them in person at the Levy Library on the 11th floor of the Annenberg Building, Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm; Saturday from 9:00 am-5:00 pm and Sunday from noon to 8:00 pm. You can also email ASCIT@mssm.edu, or call ASCIT at 212-241-7091.

“What is records management?”

I hear that a lot when I tell people that I’m the Records Manager here at Mount Sinai. And I will admit it is a fair question.

One fact that I can point out is that everyone has records that they manage. A very common example would be credit card bills. Whether you get an envelope in your mailbox or an email, every month you receive a statement telling you what you’ve charged and how much you need to pay. These statements are records. After paying the bank or American Express or the credit union, some people will save the statements, while others will delete or throw them away. That decision is a records management decision.

Mount Sinai creates or receives an enormous number of records every day, many with specific legal and regulatory requirements that must be met. One of the jobs of records management is to make sure that we keep these records long enough to meet these obligations. This is called setting retention periods and it is, in some ways, the simple part; most people like to hang on to their stuff.

The more difficult part is getting people to destroy records once their retention period is over. A few records do have long-term value; others are simply sent to storage and forgotten. Part of my job here is identifying those records that we no longer need to keep and convincing those responsible that it is okay destroy them. Since the expense of keeping records longer than necessary, in whatever format, is not trivial, this is important.

These two things are part of how Records Management helps Mount Sinai to actively manage our records. It sounds a lot like a parent trying to get a child to keep his or her room neat. It often feels like that but without the childish temper tantrums or teenage surliness. This is a serious business after all.

- Andrew Shultz, Records Manager