the logo of the 3rd General Hospital

Nursing’s Military Legacy: Isabelle V. Cedar Cook (November 1918 – July 2013)

by Ramona Tirado
Mount Sinai Archives intern, Fall 2014

Veteran’s Day is celebrated as an opportunity to reexamine past conflicts and acknowledge the men and women who have risked everything in a fight for their nations, their people and their beliefs. Military leaders recognize the great value of having clinicians available to attend those who have been wounded in battle and many Mount Sinai physicians and nurses have contributed their specialized skills in military service during wartime.

Mount Sinai’s Archives and Records Management division has among its holdings collections of documents detailing service of The Mount Sinai doctors and nurses in World War II. This Veteran’s Day, we would like to highlight one such nurse who represented the United States and The Mount Sinai Hospital in that war, Isabelle Cedar Cook.

Isabelle Cedar had just graduated from The Mount Sinai Hospital School of Nursing in 1940 when the U.S. Surgeon General proposed that Mount Sinai establish a 1000 bed hospital to treat soldiers overseas who had been wounded in the war. When the call was made for nurses to volunteer, Cook felt moved to action and enlisted to do what she felt was her duty to her nation. Cook was accepted into the Army Nurse Corps as part of Mount Sinai’s 3rd General Hospital unit, and in 1942 she reported for basic training at Camp Rucker in Alabama.

In May 1943 Cook traveled from Alabama to Casablanca, Morocco, where she and the rest of the unit awaited orders to report to the 3rd General’s site in Tunisia. Cook arrived in Tunisia as part an advance team that included 10 nurses. Upon their arrival, the nurses took over the French army barracks that the Germans had used as a hospital. The nurses were surprised to find the barracks still occupied by severely wounded Germans and a single doctor, all of whom had been left behind when the fighting ended. The nurses assumed the responsibility of caring for the wounded, and the doctor and all of the German soldiers became prisoners of war.

Over the next three years, the 3rd General Hospital would follow the front into Italy and then France. Cook celebrated the end of the war by marching in the VE (Victory in Europe) Day parade in Aix-en-Provence, France alongside Allied soldiers. The order came to close down the 3rd General in August 1945. She received her formal discharge in December 1945 having earned the rank of First Lieutenant.

In 1999, she published a book describing her experiences in the war. The book is titled In Times of War: Memoirs of a World War II Nurse.

Academic IT Support Center closing early tonight

The Academic IT Support Center (ASCIT) will be closing at 7pm tonight due to scheduled network maintenance.

Did you know that the Academic IT Support Center supports Mount Sinai Health System students, faculty and staff in a variety of ways, including assisting with hardware & software issues? You can visit them in person at the Levy Library on the 11th floor of the Annenberg Building, Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm; Saturday from 9:00 am-5:00 pm and Sunday from noon to 8:00 pm. You can also email ASCIT@mssm.edu, or call ASCIT at 212-241-7091.

“What is records management?”

I hear that a lot when I tell people that I’m the Records Manager here at Mount Sinai. And I will admit it is a fair question.

One fact that I can point out is that everyone has records that they manage. A very common example would be credit card bills. Whether you get an envelope in your mailbox or an email, every month you receive a statement telling you what you’ve charged and how much you need to pay. These statements are records. After paying the bank or American Express or the credit union, some people will save the statements, while others will delete or throw them away. That decision is a records management decision.

Mount Sinai creates or receives an enormous number of records every day, many with specific legal and regulatory requirements that must be met. One of the jobs of records management is to make sure that we keep these records long enough to meet these obligations. This is called setting retention periods and it is, in some ways, the simple part; most people like to hang on to their stuff.

The more difficult part is getting people to destroy records once their retention period is over. A few records do have long-term value; others are simply sent to storage and forgotten. Part of my job here is identifying those records that we no longer need to keep and convincing those responsible that it is okay destroy them. Since the expense of keeping records longer than necessary, in whatever format, is not trivial, this is important.

These two things are part of how Records Management helps Mount Sinai to actively manage our records. It sounds a lot like a parent trying to get a child to keep his or her room neat. It often feels like that but without the childish temper tantrums or teenage surliness. This is a serious business after all.

- Andrew Shultz, Records Manager

New Library Search Available

AIT and the Levy Library are rolling out a new library catalog and discovery system, WorldShare. WorldShare is a cloud-based software platform that will allow the library to improve patron experience. This system allows the library to streamline workflow and provide better service to the Mount Sinai community, while reducing costs.

The WorldShare platform is a product of OCLC, an innovative library cooperative providing research, programs and services to library members.

What does it mean for students and faculty?
• A streamlined, Google-like search for books, e-books, and e-journals.
• A one-stop-shop for searching across the library collection
• Easy to find books, not only in the Levy Library collection, but all over
the city and around the world

Better Discovery:
• Quick search for fast discovery
• Advanced search for targeted results
• Journal search for quick access
• Off-campus access

Future plans:
• Unified search to include articles and book chapter searching
• Unified research portal to search e-books, e-journals, articles and
more

More information? Questions, comments, concerns?
Please let us know: Refdesk@mssm.edu or 212-241-7791

 

Celebrating American Archives Month

October is American Archives Month, when archivists around the country try to explain to the public just what it is that we do and why it matters. Most people probably have the vague sense that archives preserve information about the past so that history, individual rights and responsibilities can be defined and protected. But what does that actually mean to real people?

This past year, the Mount Sinai Archives has answered over 300 requests for information from the Mount Sinai community and interested outsiders. As part of that we have:

  • provided documents proving that a father’s military service was spent abroad so that his proud daughter could join the Veterans of Foreign Wars;
  • helped children/grandchildren/family members learn more about a loved one, now gone, who attended the Mount Sinai Hospital School of Nursing as a young woman;
  • provided documents to various Mount Sinai departments to support them in their everyday activities, from report creation to lawsuits;
  • supplied information and images to scholars and authors from around the world as they wrote articles, books and blog posts;
  • sat with an actress to talk about her role as a nurse in 1900, showing her documents, notebooks and uniforms to give her a sense of what it would have felt like to be a nurse then, her duties and her training.

We have helped real people touch a piece of the past and that has made an impact on their lives. Not a bad way to spend your day.

Access to Library Resources Reduced: 9/18 from 7am-9am:

On Thursday, September 18th, 2014 from 7:00am – 9:00am, the Levy Library’s proxy server will be down for scheduled maintenance.

* During this time, there will be NO off-campus access to Levy Library resources.
* In addition, the resource links listed on the Library’s website will be invalid and will not provide on-campus access.

Access to select key resources will be available on the Mount Sinai Hospital/School campus by using the following website: http://libguides.mssm.edu/proxy_maintenance

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact a librarian at Refdesk@mssm.edu or (212) 241-7793.

Howard Lilienthal and the Creation of Modern Thoracic Surgery

A portrait of Howard Lilienthal, MD done by Frank Netter, MD. Netter served in a Mount Sinai surgical clinic in the early 1930s.

This year marks the centennial of the creation of the Thoracic Surgery Service at The Mount Sinai Hospital, today’s Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery. Howard Lilienthal, MD was the first Chief of the Division and was a pioneer in the field. Later that same year (1914), he performed the first successful pulmonary lobectomy for inflammatory disease of the lung in the United States.  Much of his surgical work was made possible by the 1910 development by Charles Elsberg, a fellow surgeon at Mount Sinai, of a successful method of endotrachial anesthesia, allowing for open chest surgery.

Howard Lilienthal lived from 1861-1946.  Over his long career, he developed seven instruments and devices (a bullet probe and forceps, a portable operating table, a rib spreader, etc.), pioneered new operations, wrote many articles, and served in a variety of roles in various professional groups.  He was President of the New York County Medical Society as well as both the New York and the American Society for Thoracic Surgery, and a founder of what became the American Cancer Society.  In 1925 he published a two volume work on Thoracic Surgery, the first such textbook in this country; it was an instant classic.  Lilienthal was an officer in World War I, serving with Mount Sinai’s Base Hospital No.3 in France, as well as being placed in other hospitals that needed his expertise.  He was cited for a Distinguished Service Medal, but it never arrived. His only son, Howard Jr., died in 1918 while serving with a British regiment.

Lilienthal has been described as “elegant and aristocratic, very much in keeping with the Mt. Sinai tradition” of his time. He enjoyed fly fishing and painting, and when his failing eyesight ended his artist’s career, he wrote short stories for children. When he died in 1946, Mount Sinai mourned the loss of one of their best and most beloved surgeons.

 

Access the Library’s Journals on Your iPhone or Tablet

The Levy Library has a new license for BrowZine, a cool new app that allows you to read the library’s full-text scholarly journals in a newsstand format optimized for your iPad, iPhone, or Android tablet.  Seamlessly access PDFs, create favorite journal lists, and save articles, even outside of our network.

Get started in 3 easy steps:

1) From your tablet or iPhone, go to the app store, search for “BrowZine” and download it for free.

2) Open BrowZine and select Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai from the list.

3) Enter your network credentials, these will be the same that you use to access library resources from off-campus.

Start browsing and reading scholarly journals!

Library Access For Faculty and Housestaff of Icahn School of Medicine

As of July 1st, 2014 faculty and housestaff with Icahn School of Medicine appointments at all sites across the Mount Sinai Health System (Beth Israel, St. Luke’s, Roosevelt, and New York Eye and Ear Infirmary) have access to the Levy Library’s online resources.

To Login:

Go to the Levy Library’s Website and select the e-journal, database, or e-book that you wish to use.  You will then be prompted to login.  Use your Mount Sinai network credentials OR your chpnet OR NYEEI ID and password.

For Help with Your Levy Library Login: 

  • BI and SLR: Contact CareTech at (212) 523-6486
  • NYEE: Contact the Help Desk at (212) 979-4273
  • Mount Sinai Hospital: Contact Academic Support Center at (212) 241-7091 or via email at: ASCIT@mssm.edu

Non-Faculty and Non-Resident Staff can access a core library collection that has been licensed for all staff at Mount Sinai Health System hospitals.  Local hospital librarians can also advise what other resources are available to you at your site.

All members of the Mount Sinai Health System are welcome to visit the Levy Library and use resources in-house.  Please bring your valid ID badge from a Mount Sinai Health System hospital.

For more information on Library Access, please see here.

Lecture Capture at ISMMS

Echo360 User Interface

When it comes to education, there are a countless number of students who are determined to study hard, get an outstanding grade, and use the knowledge they have learned in order to apply it to real life scenarios. No matter how great you are at playing the role of a student, there are still times when you will have to tend to other aspects of your life. Perhaps you have to go to the doctor for a check-up, get together with family that you haven’t seen for a while, or finally buy that dream house you have always wanted.

Trying to juggle so many aspects of your life unfortunately means you will someday have to miss a critical lecture. Even if you attend all your classes, you still have the potential to have your mind wander during that three hour lecture, which for whatever reason starts at seven in the morning. You could stress out and desperately try to get notes from your classmates or make an appointment with your Course Director to review the material. Could there be another way of dealing with this situation?

To help relieve some of the anxiety of missing a class or just simply missing a crucial piece of information during a lecture, many schools started to look to lecture capture systems as a solution. A lecture capture system is designed to have a camera record the audio and video of the instructor, and the displayed content of the lecture. All of this is then uploaded to the Learning Management System (Blackboard), allowing the students to watch the lecture on demand.

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has lecture capture (Echo360) system cameras installed in various rooms in the Annenberg and Hess buildings.

Annenberg

Hess

5-210AB

Davis Auditorium

10-74

Seminar Room A (Floor 2)

12-01

Seminar Room B (Floor 2)

13-01

If you ever find yourself in the Levy Library, take a look around and observe some of the students. You might spot some of them watching a recorded lecture. The popularity and the demand for these recorded sessions are growing and the vision to utilize the system is expanding. For the past four months the Instructional Technology Group (ITG) has been working on upgrades that will substantially enhance the usability of the system. Some of the upgrades you will notice are:

  • The branding at the top of the lecture capture player;
  • A capture will now be available as fast as two hours after the lecture has concluded;
  • A software version of the lecture capture system is now available for your laptop. As an instructor, this means you can create recorded lectures in your office on your laptop and distribute them as lecture captures through Blackboard;
  • The ability to view lecture captures from a laptop or mobile device.

Medical Education and Graduate School lectures are not the only materials being recorded. Currently, we have over 60 courses and programs using the lecture capture system. There have been various events and programs that have benefited from having their sessions saved and displayed to the students and faculty. These include:

  • Bench to Bedside
  • EHHOP Grand Rounds
  • The Fellowship Core Conference
  • speaker panels and trainings
  • the Summer Enrichment Program
  • and the USMLE Program

During 2014, our lecture capture system has recorded and produced 596 videos between the months of January and May. In 2013, we obtained 456 videos during the same 5 month span. We can see that the numbers have increased and I predict the number of captures will continue to increase, further helping the students and course directors that use it. In this regard, we should grow along with lecture capture and utilize it as best we can.

“In a Fall 2010 another lecture capture company, Tegrity, Surveyed  6,883 college age and adult higher education students, a total of 85% stated that having access to recorded lectures made study somewhat or much more effective than normal.” Greenberg, A. D., & Nilssen, A. (2011). Lecture Capture Deployment Models

“Wainhouse Research has stated elsewhere that lecture capture is today – and will remain for the foreseeable future – one of the hottest campus technologies for higher education. We have identified certain trends through conversations with colleges and universities – many of whom are clients wrestling with how to scale – which involve the need to address mobility, data, customized learning, and scalability.” Greenberg, A. D., & Nilssen, A. (2011). Lecture Capture Deployment Models