Kravis Children’s Hospital Ranks Among Nation’s Top Pediatric Centers

Kravis Children’s Hospital at Mount Sinai is nationally ranked in seven out of the ten pediatric specialties measured by U.S. News & World Report in its 2014-15 “Best Children’s Hospital” annual guidebook. Notably, for the first time, Kravis Children’s Hospital is ranked in neurology & neurosurgery, and neonatology.

The seven specialties are diabetes & endocrinology (No. 22), nephrology (No. 29), neurology & neurosurgery (No. 29), pulmonology (No. 30), gastroenterology & GI surgery (No. 40), neonatology (No. 49), and urology (No. 50). To develop the rankings, U.S. News & World Report surveyed 183 pediatric centers to obtain clinical data in each of the 10 specialties measured, and also asked 150 pediatric specialists in each specialty where they would refer their sickest patients.

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Mount Sinai Doctors Among the Best in New York

The Mount Sinai Health System was highly represented in New York magazine’s recently released list of “Best Doctors in New York,” which named 227 physicians from all seven hospitals and 36 doctors from Mount Sinai’s affiliated hospitals. The 263 physicians represented 21 percent of the total 1,251 doctors on New York magazine’s 2014 list, which appeared online and in the June 9-15, 2014 print edition. The list covers physicians from throughout the New York metropolitan region, including Connecticut and New Jersey.

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Erik Lium, PhD, Leads Mount Sinai Innovation Partners

Erik Lium, PhD, an expert in academic-industry partnerships and commercializing early-stage scientific discoveries, has joined the Mount Sinai Health System as Vice President and Executive Director of Mount Sinai Innovation Partners (MSIP). In this role, Dr. Lium leads MSIP’s efforts to foster collaborative partnerships with pharmaceutical, medical device, diagnostic, and information technology companies, and to commercialize Mount Sinai discoveries.

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How to Stay Hydrated during the Summer

It’s summer (finally!), and there’s nothing better than some quality playing-time in beautiful weather. But, with the mercury rising, dehydration is a serious concern whether you’re having a marathon practice session or match, and can affect performance when as little as 2% of your body mass is lost through sweat. Since tennis players can lose more than 2.5 liters of sweat per hour in warm weather, it’s easy to fall behind on your fluid intake if you’re not careful.

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Drug Interactions – Check for yourself & before you go to the doctor?

If you have a really good PCP, she or he will monitor all the prescriptions you take as well as any over-the-counter (OTC) vitamins and supplements you use.

But we have all heard about family members and friends who have been affected by adverse drug interactions.

This may occur because: you go to several physicians who each give you prescriptions; a prescription is changed; you buy and use OTC products; and/or you do not read the warnings on the prescription.

REMINDER: Always bring a list of all your prescriptions and OTC products to every doctor’s visit.

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Should you check your symptoms before your doctor’s appointment?

If you are like me, you may occasionally “Google” your medical symptoms. Now apps are available to help you check your symptoms systematically rather than randomly.

Recently, a WSJ article noted “Now more health-care providers are… steering patients to new and improved computerized symptom-checkers that make it easier for them to get reliable information about possible diagnoses, research their condition and even connect directly to a doctor. Doctors are adding these tools to their websites and incorporating them into electronic medical records, encouraging patients to use them before office visits to save time and make consultations more productive. Another benefit: Results turned up by a symptom-checker may actually help doctors think of something they hadn’t considered.”

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Tell your doctor about your travel history

A recent Modern Health Care article noted “The key is getting that travel history right up front when you’re interviewing the patient and then as soon as you suspect MERS—even before you do the testing—you should make sure you have that patient on isolation precautions so they don’t spread to any other patients or healthcare workers.”

“The major lesson from this first MERs experience in the U.S. for other healthcare providers is “to think about MERS you really need to get a good travel history..,”.

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Tennis Elbow

Tennis elbow is a common injury found in tennis players and other sports. The pain is on the outside of the elbow, where the wrist extensor muscles originate, and is usually tender when palpated. The pain is worsened with hand shaking, opening jars, using a knife or fork or even using a toothbrush. Tennis elbow is more common in males, and those in the range of 30-50 years of age. It is important, however, to remember that people outside this age range also get tennis elbow frequently. Tennis players make up the majority of cases, but it is also found among baseball players, gardeners, house or office cleaners, carpenters, mechanics, and golfers.

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