Tips for Avoiding Eye Infections from Contact Lenses

A new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported millions of Americans may be suffering from keratitis, an infection of the cornea, caused by improper handling of contact lenses. According to the CDC, wearing lenses too long and not cleaning them properly are the most common underlying factors of eye infections in the estimated 38 million Americans who wear contact lenses.

“Bacterial keratitis is usually treated with antibiotic drops and may require multiple return visits to your ophthalmologist,” says Marina Grapp, OD, Director, Specialty Contact Lens Service, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, “But the infection is easily avoidable with proper use.”

During Contact Lens Health Week, Dr. Grapp offers some tips for avoiding contact lens-related eye infections:

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Does a Robotic Cystectomy Offer a Superior Outcome to Open Cystectomy?

Currently, the standard of care worldwide for the treatment of patients who have cancer invading the bladder muscle (muscle invasive bladder cancer) is chemotherapy followed by surgery. In men, the surgery is called radical cystoprostatectomy (removal of the bladder, prostate, and the seminal vesicles). In women, the surgery is called anterior pelvic exentration (removal of bladder, uterus, ovaries, and part of the vagina which can sometimes be avoided). In addition, a critical part of the surgery in both men and women is removing the lymph nodes within the pelvis.

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Hernia Facts and Treatments

Merriam Webster defines a hernia as “a protrusion of an organ or part of an organ (as the intestine) through connective tissue or through a wall of the cavity (as of the abdomen) in which it is normally enclosed.” A ventral hernia arises in the abdominal wall because a weakness or defect in the abdominal muscles causes the intestines and other abdominal contents to push through. The weakness can be congenital, or it may be caused by aging or injury (i.e., surgical incision).

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Fall Allergies Versus a Cold: Tips on How to Tell the Difference

As we head through fall and on toward winter, it’s the time of year when you might start to have the sniffles, sneezing, or a cough. But what is it? Fall allergies? A cold?

Sujan Patel, MD, Assistant Professor of Allergy and Immunology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, says “Many symptoms of the common cold and fall allergies can overlap, leaving patients confused as to the best course of treatment. But there are some simple ways to tell these different conditions apart.”

Dr. Patel shares some tips on how to tell the difference between fall allergies and colds by the most common symptoms of each:

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National Healthy Eating Day

We are pleased to announce the winner of the best employee-submitted heart-healthy recipe in honor of National Healthy Eating Day on Wednesday, November 5.

Mount Sinai Heart, Food and Nutrition Services, and the chefs at The Mount Sinai Hospital have chosen two heart-healthy recipes submitted by Anna Horton, Assistant Director of Communications, Office of Development: Mexican Chopped Salad and Crispy Black Bean Quinoa Burritos.

Here are the winning recipes:

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Five Common Running Mistakes: How to Optimize Your Running Experience

With the New York City Marathon fast approaching this Sunday, many may be inspired to lace up their sneakers and get to running. Running is a great way to get exercise while exploring the city however, below are five of the most common mistakes made by runners.

Improper Shoes

Most novice runners lace up an old pair of sneakers and start to run but, this has many pitfalls. The type of shoe you wear has to be right for your individual foot. It also should not be worn out, as that will change the biomechanics of the shoe/run dynamic. It is best to go to a specialty running store, where a knowledgeable salesperson can evaluate your foot type, and inward foot movement, to see if you are an over-pronator, under-pronator or a neutral runner – each type of foot requires a different shoe type. It is also important to then replace the shoe every 300 miles, or when you can visibly notice wear on the bottom of the shoe.

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Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory Renamed To Honor Samin K. Sharma, MD

The Mount Sinai Hospital has renamed its cardiac catheterization laboratory the “Dr. Samin K. Sharma Family Foundation Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory,” an honor that recognizes the many significant contributions of Samin K. Sharma, MD, Director of Interventional Cardiology and the Zena and Michael A. Wiener Professor of Medicine (Cardiology). Dr. Sharma, his family, and other generous donors helped the Foundation reach its $5 million endowment, funding that will help support the lab’s clinical, research, and educational initiatives.

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Mount Sinai and Healthfirst® Introduce New Medicare Advantage Insurance Plan

The Mount Sinai Health System and Healthfirst, a leading managed care organization serving more than one million members in downstate New York, have launched a unique, co-branded Medicare Advantage (MA) insurance plan for Manhattan residents. Eligible Medicare beneficiaries can enroll in Healthfirst Mount Sinai Select (HMO) between October 15 and December 7, 2014, for coverage effective January 1, 2015.

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Third Annual SINAInnovations Conference “Engineering and Medicine”

This year’s program will feature a number of exciting speakers, exhibitors, and demonstrations exploring the expanding interface between engineering and medicine—and how it is transforming all aspects of health care.

Topics include: breakthroughs in material science, nanotechnology, and imaging; genomics and personalized medicine; transformative technologies, including apps, software, and mobile technologies; and engineering to improve global health.

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